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[Articles Home]  [Add Article]  

A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band

from Caitlyn M. Martin / K7VO on April 10, 2005
Website: http://www.mizuhoradio.com/personal/k7vo
View comments about this article!

Last week I took a road trip to the Raleigh, NC area from my home in Cincinnati, OH. It was part vacation and part interview. The interview part went very well indeed. The ham radio part was good as well as a failure in my mobile system had a silver lining.

I left with the Icom IC-901A (with UX-39A 222MHz module) installed in the car. The 2m/440 leads went to a Daiwa duplexer and a Maldol EX-107 dual band antenna mounted on one side of my trunk. The 222 lead when to a Hustler SF-220 I had acquired new from a good friend who had bought a spare last fall. The idea was that this arrangement would have a bit more gain on 2m and 222 than the triband antenna.

Everything seemed fine when I left. It wasn't, at least not for long. The 2m/440 side failed. I had a very high SWR. I tried taking the duplexer out of line and just trying one band or the other. No good. I had a new Opek el cheapo trunk lip mount in the car just in case. I tried it, taking the Diamond K400 mount and RG-189 coax out of line. No good.

What had failed? The Maldol antenna itself. I didn't have a replacement with me and I wasn't about to turn around. For the duration of the trip my IC-901A became a 222MHz monobander. As it turned out this was a good thing. I learned that there is now solid 222MHz coverage between Cincinnati and northeast of Raleigh, NC. I learned just how good the linked systems have become. I also found no lack of people to talk to. A linked system in West Virginia and Virginia now features 10 repeaters and also covers into parts of Kentucky and North Carolina. This was especially helpful while I sat for over three hours stuck behind an overturned milk truck on a closed I-64. The 224.34 and 224.36 repeaters really were helpful in keeping me sane during that time. I'd list the callsigns of the hams I talked to but I honestly don't remember them all and I don't want to offend anyone by leaving them out.

One callsign I will mention is KQ4Q. Mark and I have talked on my various trips up and down the I-77 corridor in recent years and he was one of the hams I talked to in Charleston on 224.34 and down the linked system on 224.84, 224.24, 224.74. and finally on the repeater he owns in Bluefield on 224.86. My thanks for all his time riding along with me and for a very pleasant conversation as always.

My route, for those who might live along my travel path and not realize that there is plenty of 222 MHz activity in their area, was down I-471 out of Cincinnati, southeast along the AA Highway in Kentucky, then east on I-64 through the Ashland, KY, Huntington, WV and Charleston, WV areas. I went down I-64/I-77 through Beckley, WV and continued down I-77 through Bluefield, Wytheville, VA and into North Carolina where I picked up I-74 east. I took I-74/US-52 to Winston-Salem, NC and then I-40 east from there.

Anyway, I came home on Thursday night and on Friday I put the Comet CFX-324 triplexer and Diamond CR-320A triband antenna back in/on the car. All is well again and my rig is a tribander again. I also found out where there actually is activity in the TriState (Cincinnati) area on 222 MHz since the 224.06 went down. It's on repeaters outside the area with wide coverage that includes Cincinnati. I had nice QSOs on the 224.96 (Middletown, OH) and 224.16 (Dayton) repeaters.

If you live in NC, VA, WV, KY, or OH I highly recommend 222 MHz FM if you don't have the capability already. There are less people than on 2m but more are willing to talk and happy to have activity on the repeaters. I believe, from past experience, that describes 222 MHz in lots of places.

Member Comments:
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A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by N3ZKP on April 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Nice article, Caity.

Glad you had a safe and enjoyable and informative trip, the wreck and radio troubles not withstanding.

Lon
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K3TD on April 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Thanks for the great article, Caity! Now that manufacturers are putting 222 MHz in their "dual band" portables, that may help the band grow. A bigger help will be when they start including it in their dual band mobiles!

73,
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by KU4VQ on April 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
222 has areas of the country with good amount of activity. In Knoxville and Chattanooga 222 repeaters are quite active. I have made contacts in the Boston area with my 300mw HT. Here in Central FL is another story. I am able to hear one repeater and days go by without any traffic. California has some great linked systems that almost cover from border to border.

E-ham, and eBay are good sources for finding used 222 mobiles and HT's very reasonable. I have seen oder HT's go for less than 100.00.

I have had simular experience with operating 6 meter mobile. I travel for work around many areas of the East Coast and Midwest.

See you on 222 and also on 222.100 SSB from EL99

George KU4VQ
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by KD4AC on April 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
It's unfortunate that 220 doesn't get more use. Probably the biggest thing going against it is the lack of equipment since the U.S. (as far as I know) is the only country to have access to this band. The availability of equipment wasn't always a problem. Shortly after novice enhancement went into effect in 1987, there was a proliferation of 220 equipment from Icom, Kenwood and Yaesu. By far, Kenwood produced the most radios for 220. My first 220 radio was a Kenwood TH-315 handheld and TM-331 mobile. I eventually sold the mobile and bought Kenwood's new TM-631A. I really liked that radio. While it only had 20 memories per bank, it was a nicely laid out radio with all the features I needed. Besides, I have radios today that hold hundreds of memories and I can barely fill up more than 20 anyway. Southern California, at the time and quite possibly to this day, had a lot of 220 activity. The CONDOR system is linked through out CA, Las Vegas and Phoenix. When the FCC decided to hand over 2 MHz of spectrum to UPS for a radio system they never built, it seemed the the number of radios started to disappear, with Kenwood being one of the last manufacturers to fill the void with the TM-331, which they recently stopped producing as far as I know. While 2M/70cm dual band radios were quite the norm in the 90s, my friends and I had very little interest in 70cm in San Diego because there were only about 10 repeaters throughout all of Southern CA that were open to everyone. Everything else was private. Now I'm here in Tampa (hoping to move to AZ in a year God willing) and I would really like to get active on 220 again. It's nice to see there are a few manufacturers out there making some 220 equipment. Alinco is the only one that I know of that makes a mobile radio, very similar to the TM-331 of yesterday. Kenwood and Yaesu have started to include it in their HTs, although Yaesu does so with low power levels that hardly make it worth the effort. Even if I had the equipment, I haven't heard any activity here in the Tampa area on my VX-7.
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Very good! Of the article topics that have passed the synapses of my feeble brain, I must admit that I had not thought of one (as yet) specifically addressing our 135 centimeter band!

We have a somewhat different problem hear in what is called the L.A. Basin. We have since the early 1980’s had basically every 220 MHz channel filled and complete with repeaters. In those days, we of course had a 5 MegaHertz wide band. Then when we lost the lower 2 Meg’s, all of the repeater owners were doing a mad scramble, as any re-channeling of folks who had frequency allocations down in the lower 2 Meg’s would in many cases affect folks who had coordinated frequency pairs in the upper part of the band. Of course also soon to enter the argument was from some of us who operated Single Sideband. We had even before the loss of 40% of the band, had a lesser portion of ‘guard-band’ spectrum (by joule energy level perspective), to protect us from the sidebands of those folks using FM, than we enjoyed on 6 or 2 Meters and the higher bands.

We do need to use this band, and encourage its use! It is the NEXT ‘magic band’! There are many folks that have said that there isn’t enough 222 MHz equipment, and they decry that the FT100D, or IC-706 should also include 222 MHz. Actually it is an easy thing to make these radios work on 222 MHz, and they make a very desirable I.F. to do just that! We do need more equipment options, and we need to spend money on this band! There are though quite a few good options out there right now!
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K3TD on April 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I believe Alinco still makes a 222 MHz FM mobile - the DR-235T, but can't recall what the model numbers were for the ICOM/Kenwood/Yaesu single band mobiles. Does anyone remember? I'm sure they are available at hamfests, eBay, etc.

73,
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by KD4AC on April 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Icom put out two different 220 mobiles - the IC 37A and IC 38A. They also produced a 2M/1.25M mobile called the IC 2330A.

Kenwood's single band mobile was the TM-733. They had two dual band radios - the TM 631A 2M/1.25M and the TM 642 which had the option of adding a third band (10, 6, 70 or 23).

From what I can tell, Yaesu had nothing.
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by KF4VGX on April 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Nice read and a good topic.

Need some of that here activity here in the South.
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by W6TH on April 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
.

Very interesting topic. It is good news to hear the other wavelengths are being used.

I am tempted to go FM. Such a small antenna could be fun.

.:
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Vito, does the antenna size change with mode?
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K4IJ on April 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
If more people would simply buy a 220 radio they would find that the band is pretty cool.
It's a lot like 2 meters but better in some ways.
I use the Alinco 235 which I picked up second hand for about $200. I also have a Kenwood F6A which is a great tri-band radio. I have been building UHF repeaters here and am in the process of building a 220. It will be 224.460 and located on Poore Mountian in Roanoke, VA. We also have plans to link with Alex and Mark up into West Virginia on the system you were using.
220 is indeed alive and well, we just need more people to use it to keep it that way.

73
Mike K4IJ
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by N1VLQ on April 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Much as I doubt there is much 222 activity near me (while not the end of the earth, it is near here!) I'd love to add some 222 equipment.

I just find it amazing that the only transverters that I can find are so expensive. I realize that this isn't a cheap hobby, but it's a shame that there aren't more lower cost options to get into 222.

I know, it's a catch-22. If more people used it, more manufacturers would make more equipment available.

I'll keep watching, maybe someday I'll find something I can afford. Keep it up, folks. I enjoy reading about this stuff.
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by NE0P on April 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
KD4AC wrote: " Probably the biggest thing going against it is the lack of equipment since the U.S. (as far as I know) is the only country to have access to this band."

NO NO NO!!! I don't know how this myth got started, and why it stays alive. 222mhz is a region 2 band. That includes North America and South America, which is 40 countries or so. If you don't believe me, look in the repeater directory. There are numerous 222 machines listed for South America. Lets not limit this band more than it already is.

73s John NE0P
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by N6TZ on April 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
220 as we usually call it, has always been the best vhf band in So. California.

It was the true family band in the 1980s until cell phones hit in the 90s and the xyl and kids started using them.

Now the activity level is down, but the quality of the ops on the band is still the best.

I have several 220 rigs, but my favorite is the ADI-247. Sadly, I received an AES catalog in the mail the other day and noticed that only the two meter ADI version is offered now. Maybe if we beat the drum a bit, ADI will see a market for the 220 version again.

I normally run just a 1/2 wave spike on the car, but have a Larsen 5/8 wave in the trunk for longer trips. For home, I have up a copper pipe J pole for 220, and two J poles for 2 meters, one for voice and the other for two meter packet.

See you on 220, the gentlemen's band.

Hal, N6TZ
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by NS6Y_ on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Elecraft does make some nice transverters.......
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WB5YYX on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
The article you have written is excellent! I applaud your efforts to increase interest and activity on the 11/4 meter amateur radio band. It is now primary amateur and with the availibility of equipment, antennas, etc, there is no reason not to use it! Here in New Mexico unfortunately I refer to it as "the forgotten band". I have been using it for well over 30 years including contesting. It has excellent propagation characteristics and is less likely to be harmonicallly/sub-harmonically related to other amateur radio bands (interference) except a portion of upper 70 cm. When time and financial support permits I want to create a 222 MHz repeater that will cover the Estancia Valley area (Eastern Mountain) of New Mexico. I have a Yaesu FT-736R with four modules (including 6, 2, 11/4 meters, 70 cm) multimode in my shack. I also have a Kenwood THF6A HT which has 11/4 meters with full 5 watts on FM. My next step would be to get a mobile 11/4 meter radio. Many amateur radio mobiles skip over 11/4 meters because it is only amateur radio authorized in ITU Region 2. Perhaps someone commenting on this topic could recommend one? Anyway 11/4 meter increased use is a future goal for myself.

Bob Scupp WB5YYX
Life member ARRL and QCWA
Former ARRL Rocky Mountain
Division Vice-Director 1990-1994
Estancia Valley Amateur Radio
Association
ARES


 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K7VO on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
KD4DAC:

220MHz is a ham band throughout region 2 including Canada and much of Central and South America. A handful of other countries around the world also have 222. Somalia is one I know of for certain.

To correct some of your assumptions about equipment:

ADI and Alinco both currently produce 222MHz mobile rigs. The Alinco is particularly good.

Yaesu made the FT-311RM. I know because I have one. There is one for auction on eBay right now and two more auctions just ended. Way back when the FT-127RA was the 222MHz version of the Memorizer. They still turn up on the used market. One with a tone board typically goes for around $75-100.

In addition to the Icom models you listed 222 modules were available for the IC-900A and IC-901A multiband mobiles. Kenwood produced a number of dual band mobiles (TM-621A, TM-631A), monoband mobiles (TM-321A, TM-3530A), and 222 modules for their triband rigs. Other companies who produced 222 mobile rigs included Azden and KDK.

In other words, 222 mobiles are easy to find on the used market and are available new at any ham store in the country. Handhelds are also readily available.

There is NO lack of equipment.

73,
Caity
K7VO/8
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K7VO on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
"Much as I doubt there is much 222 activity near me"

That means you don't know, right? Are there any repeaters near you?

A lot of places have excellent repeaters with great coverage and next to no traffic. If you get a rig throw out your call on these repeaters and let folks on your local 2m repeater, in your local club, etc... know that you are monitoring the 222 repeater as well. If it has wider coverage than the 2m repeaters do let folks know this as well. In other words stir up some activity.

I have yet to talk to someone on the 224.24 in the Cincinnati area. I keep trying, though. I've been through Florence, SC a number of times and have never talked to anyone on the one and only repeater there. It seems to have very good coverage along I-95.

When I lived in the Raleigh, NC area the 224.22 and 224.58 (both in Louisburg, on the channel 47 tower) had moderate traffic. I talked to a couple of folks on 224.58 on my recent visit. The 224.84 (Grifton, eastern part of the state) is busier than most 2m repeaters.

The funny thing about the situation in NC is that the 224.16 (Auburn, channel 5 tower), the widest coverage repeater in the eastern half of the state, has very little traffic at all. I meet one friend there and we do use it but almost nobody else does. I've hit that machine or heard people on it who were in places as diverse as Lumberton, Asheboro, Lake Gaston VA, Greensboro, Kinston, etc... No 2m machine even approaches this sort of coverage. K4ITL has done an amazing job with this particular repeater. Yet machines with much more limited coverage seem to get much more use, I guess out of habit.

There are other machines in that area (224.88 in Cary, 224.66 in Efland) that are virtually unused despite being excellent repeaters.

There is a point to all of this. This repeaters are an excellent resource just waiting to be used.

73,
Caity
K7VO/8
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by KD4AC on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
"ADI and Alinco both currently produce 222MHz mobile rigs. The Alinco is particularly good."

Alinco I knew of and mentioned. I had forgotten about ADI, probably because I'm not as familiar with them and don't buy any of their products.

"Yaesu made the FT-311RM. I know because I have one. There is one for auction on eBay right now and two more auctions just ended. Way back when the FT-127RA was the 222MHz version of the Memorizer. They still turn up on the used market. One with a tone board typically goes for around $75-100."

To be honest, I thought Yaesu had made some at the time. I was basing my information on radios I could find listed on rigpix.com.

"In addition to the Icom models you listed 222 modules were available for the IC-900A and IC-901A multiband mobiles. Kenwood produced a number of dual band mobiles (TM-621A, TM-631A), monoband mobiles (TM-321A, TM-3530A), and 222 modules for their triband rigs. Other companies who produced 222 mobile rigs included Azden and KDK."

I had forgotten about the Kenwood 3530. I liked the 2M versions of that radio so if I find a 3520 floating around, I may have to try acquiring it. I didn't mention the Icom radios because you had already mentioned them, or at least the 901, in your article. I was familiar with the IC-900. I almost thought of buying one back in the day, but I had never even heard of the 901. Had I known about it, I might have gotten in and the SSB module. Azden and KDK are brands I've heard of, but stay away from simply because I don't like them.
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K7VO on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I just had to repeat the trip this past week/weekend (and will have to do it one more time yet) and this time I tried 2m. Lots and lots and lots of repeaters, most all of them silent.

On one repeater in Huntington, WV I gace out my ID a couple of times. That was immediately followed by someone calling their buddies who promptly got into a four way roundtable. The visitor to the area was simply ignored. On 222 folks are just plain happy to hear activity. On 2m on some machines it seems if you aren't part of the local clique nobody is interested in talking to you. I've experienced this before in other places. Why is that?

Maybe I should just put an FT-311RM in the car and go monoband 222 and perhaps 6m.

73,
Caity
K7VO/8
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K2ROK on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Bob, WB5YYX mentioned he refers to the band as the "forgotten band." I agree. In fact, I wrote an article published in CQ VHF in the late 90s about 222 mhz with that exact title! (I was KB2BZP back then).

One of the things I remarked then, and still believe, is that 222 offers the best that 2 meters and 440 have wrapped up in one band. For example...it "appears" (in quotes because I have no scientific proof!) that groundwave propagation on 222 is better than 2 meters, and with a lot less noise. The quiet and uncrowded nature of the band also makes it a haven for long, interesting QSO's (almost like being on 17 meters HF on a Saturday).

When I wrote the article, 222 was going through a transition. The big three seemed to quite offering it in their radios, while Alinco and ADI picked up the market. Today, ADI is not a player and Alinco still is...at a pretty decent price to boot. But Alinco is not the only kid on the block anymore when it comes to 222. Today 222 is making a comback thanks to Kenwood and Yaesu's new HTs. All we need now is to see those companies offer it in a mobile rig and we will be back where 222 was when Novice Enhancement was all the rage.

Funny, one of the appeals of 222 is that it is not well-known (I call it the "12 meter band" of VHF now) but at the same time there's plenty of room for everyone, and the water's fine...so come in in!!
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K7VO on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
K2ROK: Has ADI discontinued their 222 rigs? I still see them offered at a number of ham retailers. They still seem to be in the market.

73,
Caity
K7VO/8
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by KD4AC on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
"Today 222 is making a comback thanks to Kenwood and Yaesu's new HTs."

I remember when 6M was seldomed used. Thanks to the 706 and FT-100, 6M activity is on the rise. There are quite a few 6M repeaters in Southern California and I really enjoyed my FT-8900 on that band. In fact, I used it as a 6M/2M mobile because there were no 10M repeaters in my area and 70cm was pretty useless since 95% of the machines were all private. I just wish there were some 6M repeaters down here in Tampa. Oh well, I'm hoping to move west in a year anyway.
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by KD4AC on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
"I just had to repeat the trip this past week/weekend (and will have to do it one more time yet) and this time I tried 2m. Lots and lots and lots of repeaters, most all of them silent."

I know what you mean. When I moved down here to Tampa almost two years ago, I was looking forward to doing some mobile HF operation and work the county hunters. But, alas, the HF antenna (Outbacker) developed a problem. So, we were limited to VHF/UHF. I scanned around the bands quite frequently and heard very little activity. I kept one side of my 8900 tuned to 146.520 all the way across the U.S. and we only heard someone on that frequency in Tucson, AZ and again in Houston, TX. That was it. Anyway, the problem with the Outbacker was the 3/8"-24 stud mount...it had rusted internally. I guess I hadn't sealed it well enough. I went out and got a stainless steel one at a marine shop here in town. Then I proceded to work all but one station on the "Route 66 On The Air" event while mobile, one of them on 40M.
 
Monty Python  
by KA4KOE on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Clinton:

Bring out your DEDs!

P
 
Yes on 6m  
by NE0P on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Hi Caity

Yes get a 6 meter rig in the car! 6 meters mobile is a blast, IF you have a band opening, which as you know, can be few and far between this time of year. Still, it is alot of fun handing out grid squares while you are running around, and just having some nice QSOs, which don't depend on being close enough to the repeater. I recently picked up a Kenwood TS60 to go mobile with on my longer trips.

73s John NE0P
 
Caity, you need to get real!  
by N6AYJ on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Caity, I am worried about you. You are taking ham radio so damned seriously that you are setting yourself up for disappointment and disillusionment. I have been a ham a lot longer than you, and I have seen the depression that sets into hams who have put so much time and energy into ham radio, thinking it will change their lives for the better, when they discover what a fundamentally flawed hobby it is. It won't, and can't, change your life. How could it; it's just a dumb hobby. You need to start thinking more realistically. It is rather obvious that you have an insecure need to believe in ham radio, while disregarding all the apparent evidence that it will be ultimately unrewarding. Why did you get involved in ham radio in the first place? Was your life dull and uninteresting? Did you really think that ham radio would make it more rewarding and interesting? You need to face the fact that you are going to have to find a meaningful endeavor somewhere else.
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WD8OST on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
on the aes web site adi 220 stil there 209$
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K2ROK on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
An email inquiry I sent to ADI about a year ago was answered that ADI is only producing the 2 meter mobile and their basic 2 meter HT. Maybe that circumstance has changed?
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WD8OST on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
aes web site-adi 220-as of this date was there- may be left over have not called them
 
RE: Caity, you need to get real!  
by K7VO on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
N6AYJ: Boy have you ever made some assumptions about me that are totally off. Ham radio isn't my life. It isn't my main hobby. I spend far more time playing with my ferrets than I do with ham radio.

Take it too seriously? I doubt it. I had to make a trip to North Carolina (three, actually, but I am not about to share the details why on this forum) and I ended up with just a 222 monobander in the car. I found it, or should I say the people on 222, to be very good company indeed. Tell me, what do you feel is wrong with talking to people, meeting people, and chatting while driving along an otherwise boring interstate highway?

I have an active life, I assure you. I am in a nice, long term relationship. I have other interests and many friends. I have a career that despite some ups and downs has mostly been rewarding. Tell me: what is wrong with your life that you have to assume negative things about people? What makes you see the worst in everything?

Dumb hobby? Tell that to the Red Cross volunteers at the shelter I worked at (in a senior citizens center) during Hurricane Isabel. Their cell phones were down, land lines were down, and I was their communications with the outside world for about three hours. They were effusive in their thanks for this "dumb hobby". The work we local hams did then was cited when the county planning board and commissioners changed the local tower ordinance to make things less restrictive for hams so it seems local government appreciated it too.

Why did I get into this hobby? A guy who was very impotant in my life at the time. Why do I stay in it? How about all the wonderful people I've met. I have great face-to-face friendships that started on the air. Keith and I went to a friend's birthday dinner last year. We were four couples and a couple of singles. Most of us met through ham radio. Tell me, what is wrong with that? The fact that I get to help out my community every once in a while is another good reason.

My "real" life is fine, thank you. What about yours? Oh, and if ham radio is so "dumb" why are you even here in a ham forum?

73,
Caity
K7VO/8
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by KV4BL on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Excellent article!!! Here in central SC, there are few 222 machines and little activity. One trend in this area that I don't particularly understand is that, as far as I can tell, every darn one of the 222 machines seems to be linked to either a 2 meter or a 440 machine. I am not aware of any stand-alone 222 machines. Let me first state that I am not knocking the gracious individuals who spend their time and money and go to the trouble to put up the machines, but it seems to me that stand-alone 222 machines might draw a little more interest. Long before I had any 222 gear, I wanted badly to obtain some as there was a powerful "mystique" surrounding 222 MHz. The vast majority of VHF and UHF ham gear and scanners could not receive this band so you really wondered what was happening on the band and what those lucky enough to have 222 gear were experiencing there. I finally got a Kenwood TH-F6A a few years ago and find that any 222 MHz repeater that I can hit is also linked to 2 meters or 440 MHz. To me, this kinda cheapens the experience. One totally awesome 222 repeater is linked to a 2 meter machine. The link has been plagued by weak audio for some time and makes communication between the 2 meter and 220 side irritating at best due to the low audio and CW ID that is our of sync between the two sides. The 2 meter side is a wide area coverage machine and is an excellent repeater in its own right. using either one (2m or 222 side) ties up the other so that it cannot be used at the same time. I can't help but wonder how much better the whole experience might be if they were both stand-alones or maybe stand-alones with link capability if needed. The coverage of the 222 machine with just a ht is nothing short of phenomenal! Whatever the owner did to make this thing work speaks well for his abilities as well as 222 Mhz. There seems to be a trend in some areas toward large linked 222 systems and this sounds good as it generally keeps the integrity (sp?) of the 222 band intact, even though linking is probably through a higher band. In some instances, linking a 222 and another repeater might be the way to go, but my point is that when EVERY one in an area is linked to another band, it does seem to detract from the mystique of 222. What are your thoughts? 73, Ray KV4BL
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by NS6Y_ on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Well said Caity, just ignore that sourball, if this hobby is so dumb, I'm sure he can find more to do with his valuable time.
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by W6TH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
.

John, just think what my 500 foot Beverage will do on 220. Bet I will be heard throughout Europe with a 599.

.:
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by W4GRW on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
For all the 220 enthusiasts out there, please remember that Tuesday, April 12th, from 7-11PM local time, will be the 220 Spring Sprint. Hope to hear ya'll on the air, on FM Simplex and SSB/CW..
for more details see http://www.etdxa.org/vhf.htm

73
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Caity, I think the answer to your question as to ‘why strangers are not spoken to, only folks that are known’ is because 2 Meters, and FM in general is becoming a sort of CB! This may not be the case on 1.35, and I know it is not the case on 6 Meters but, it is part of our new ‘World of Ham Radio’ as the ARRL might put it!

People don’t call CQ anymore, many are not taught how to (in the method by which they come into Ham radio). Also, as another Ham has said before, when he is not chastising me for the number of words in my articles, Ham’s do not/can not hold conversations!

I’m not saying this is universal, thank god, but it is becoming much more common. People on 220 SSB seem much friendlier to me!
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Caity, I think the answer to your question as to ‘why strangers are not spoken to, only folks that are known’ is because 2 Meters, and FM in general is becoming a sort of CB! This may not be the case on 1.35, and I know it is not the case on 6 Meters but, it is part of our new ‘World of Ham Radio’ as the ARRL might put it!

People don’t call CQ anymore, many are not taught how to (in the method by which they come into Ham radio). Also, as another Ham has said before, when he is not chastising me for the number of words in my articles, Ham’s do not/can not hold conversations!

I’m not saying this is universal, thank god, but it is becoming much more common. People on 220 SSB seem much friendlier to me!
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Caity, I think the answer to your question as to ‘why strangers are not spoken to, only folks that are known’ is because 2 Meters, and FM in general is becoming a sort of CB! This may not be the case on 1.35, and I know it is not the case on 6 Meters but, it is part of our new ‘World of Ham Radio’ as the ARRL might put it!

People don’t call CQ anymore, many are not taught how to (in the method by which they come into Ham radio). Also, as another Ham has said before, when he is not chastising me for the number of words in my articles, Ham’s do not/can not hold conversations!

I’m not saying this is universal, thank god, but it is becoming much more common. People on 220 SSB seem much friendlier to me!
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Caity, I think the answer to your question as to ‘why strangers are not spoken to, only folks that are known’ is because 2 Meters, and FM in general is becoming a sort of CB! This may not be the case on 1.35, and I know it is not the case on 6 Meters but, it is part of our new ‘World of Ham Radio’ as the ARRL might put it!

People don’t call CQ anymore, many are not taught how to (in the method by which they come into Ham radio). Also, as another Ham has said before, when he is not chastising me for the number of words in my articles, Ham’s do not/can not hold conversations!

I’m not saying this is universal, thank god, but it is becoming much more common. People on 220 SSB seem much friendlier to me!
 
Glass Half-Empty People  
by KA4KOE on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Good for you Caity. I wouldn't have even responded. Some people are like Van-De-Graf generators---all they do is emit huge amounts of negative energy.

I may do a report on Van De Graf (hope I spelled his name correctly) for a future DED. He was truly a big lightning man that Tesla would've approved of.

PHILIP
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K2ROK on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
You're right on Ray regarding linking 220 to other bands. I think the background on this though goes back to the late 80s when 220 was getting sliced by the Gov't -- and a lot of 220 owners linked their machines to create the impression the band was in use. I like your use of the work mystique too, I mean I still think it is odd to see "222" on the display even to this day.

I think stand-alone is the way to go -- and here in the Buffalo area were are fortunate to have several 220 stand-alone machines here and across the border. 2 meter and 220 linking does make a lot of sense because if you can work it on 220 you will be certainly able to work it on 2 meters and most of us have 2 meter gear.
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WB2WIK on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Nice story, Caity.

I've been on the 135cm band, including FM, since 1969 when everything was crystal controlled and way too expensive. I still have my first 220 MHz synthesized rig, the Midland 13-513, from the mid-70s.

Great band.

73

Steve WB2WIK/6

 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Caity, I think the answer to your question as to ‘why strangers are not spoken to, only folks that are known’ is because 2 Meters, and FM in general is becoming a sort of CB! This may not be the case on 1.35, and I know it is not the case on 6 Meters but, it is part of our new ‘World of Ham Radio’ as the ARRL might put it!

People don’t call CQ anymore, many are not taught how to (in the method by which they come into Ham radio). Also, as another Ham has said before, when he is not chastising me for the number of words in my articles, Ham’s do not/can not hold conversations!

I’m not saying this is universal, thank god, but it is becoming much more common. People on 220 SSB seem much friendlier to me!
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Caity, I think the answer to your question as to ‘why strangers are not spoken to, only folks that are known’ is because 2 Meters, and FM in general is becoming a sort of CB! This may not be the case on 1.35, and I know it is not the case on 6 Meters but, it is part of our new ‘World of Ham Radio’ as the ARRL might put it!

People don’t call CQ anymore, many are not taught how to (in the method by which they come into Ham radio). Also, as another Ham has said before, when he is not chastising me for the number of words in my articles, Ham’s do not/can not hold conversations!

I’m not saying this is universal, thank god, but it is becoming much more common. People on 220 SSB seem much friendlier to me!
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Caity, I think the answer to your question as to ‘why strangers are not spoken to, only folks that are known’ is because 2 Meters, and FM in general is becoming a sort of CB! This may not be the case on 1.35, and I know it is not the case on 6 Meters but, it is part of our new ‘World of Ham Radio’ as the ARRL might put it!

People don’t call CQ anymore, many are not taught how to (in the method by which they come into Ham radio). Also, as another Ham has said before, when he is not chastising me for the number of words in my articles, Ham’s do not/can not hold conversations!

I’m not saying this is universal, thank god, but it is becoming much more common. People on 220 SSB seem much friendlier to me!
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by W5AOX on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Caitlyn, I built a 224.94 repeater/remote base system back in the 1980's and have kept it on the air ever since. I was very tickled to read your article on 222 activity back there.... I will make it a point to take at least a 220 HT with me next trip to that side of the Mississippi. I always assumed 220 activity was as dead out there as it is here. We have several open 220 repeaters here in the Albuquerque area of NM (224.94, 224.58, 223.94, 224.000) but almost no traffic on any of them, except for 224.58, which is linked full time to 146.58 simplex, a very popular local mobile rag-chew frequency.
Even when I had frequency agile HF-SSB and 2 meter FM remote bases enabled, the only real use was the occasional teenaged visitor from CA coming through.
I'm guessing there are 20-30 hams in N-Central NM still owning 220 gear, but very seldom hear any of them on this band.
Nice response to the naysayer, BTW. My wife's auntie, recently SK, got into ham radio via her first husband's influence. She was a very interesting gal, outliving several ham husbands. She delighted in shopping for new boyfriends and husbands at hamfests and ham clubs. She seemed to think in spite of the "typical fat slob unhealty ham syndrome" that most hams were technically savvy and knew how to earn a living.
Jim W5AOX
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Caity, I think the answer to your question as to ‘why strangers are not spoken to, only folks that are known’ is because 2 Meters, and FM in general is becoming a sort of CB! This may not be the case on 1.35, and I know it is not the case on 6 Meters but, it is part of our new ‘World of Ham Radio’ as the ARRL might put it!

People don’t call CQ anymore, many are not taught how to (in the method by which they come into Ham radio). Also, as another Ham has said before, when he is not chastising me for the number of words in my articles, Ham’s do not/can not hold conversations!

I’m not saying this is universal, thank god, but it is becoming much more common. People on 220 SSB seem much friendlier to me!
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Caity, I think the answer to your question as to ‘why strangers are not spoken to, only folks that are known’ is because 2 Meters, and FM in general is becoming a sort of CB! This may not be the case on 1.35, and I know it is not the case on 6 Meters but, it is part of our new ‘World of Ham Radio’ as the ARRL might put it!

People don’t call CQ anymore, many are not taught how to (in the method by which they come into Ham radio). Also, as another Ham has said before, when he is not chastising me for the number of words in my articles, Ham’s do not/can not hold conversations!

I’m not saying this is universal, thank god, but it is becoming much more common. People on 220 SSB seem much friendlier to me!
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by KV9R on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I find 2m here in Ft.Wayne to have the same type of clique. I'll have to give 222Mhz a try, there are 2 repeters listed in the local area and several others within 50 miles.
 
RE: Caity, you need to get real!  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Caity, this guy is right!

When he worked South American DX, and a station in Bermuda on a frequency right next to a Television channel where others were watching 60 Minutes -- that was no big deal! When he built a station set-up to bounce a signal off the Moon, and heard it return, it gave him no thrill. When he worked other Ham’s via a satellite in outer space, the result was the same. When he worked long and hard to understand the physics behind the use of certain “low noise” amplifier devices, and built equipment for the UHF and SHF spectrum, it all seemed like so much bother and bore!

He has been licensed longer than you, I figure maybe 9 years. So you see, he has been at it so long, there is just nothing more to do! I’m scrambling to catch up with him myself! He is just bored; it was all such a big waste.

I’m still pretty excited myself! There is still much to do.
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K4JSR on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Caity, I wish you had written this article back when
the FCC let UPS steal the bottom two MHz of the 220 band.
I had a wide coverage repeater on top of Sawnee Mountain, near Cumming, Ga., When the FCC took away 220-to- 222 MHZ, you could start seeing the cob-webbs forming on the squelch tails of the repeaters in Georgia. The popular opinion was that 222-225 MHZ would be soon to follow and there was no need to spend money on a soon to be non-existing ham band.
I gave up and after the last time lightning took out my repeater's power supply, I just took it down and
put the repeater in my closet, where it still rests today. There are plenty of 135 cm repeaters around the metro Atlanta area today, but most are as silent as mine-sitting in my closet-is. What a pity!
However I have found a bit of fun on 6 meters SSB
and on FM with my glorious, wonderful, marvelous,
(Eat your heart out, BFH!) VX-5! The VX-5, like all of todays talkies, operates far better on a real antenna than on the factory duck, which is -10 dBDL--
10 dB below the efficiency of a Dummy Load!

Excellent article, and deeply needed.

73, Cal K4JSR
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Yea, I'm going for a Rhombic myself. It's 5 wavelengths per leg so, it's about 40 feet long!
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by W6TH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
.

John, I am going to try 2.22 Mhz. It may have more operators listening.

.:
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by NK2U on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I took my 220 HT with me on vacation to New Orleans, LA and although 5 repeaters were listed in the repeater directory, not one came up!

There's plenty of 220 activity here in NJ, all the repeaters are open and the operators are great.

Roland, NK2U
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Vito, If you model you 1.35 Meter Beverage antenna after the original design, conceived by using a barb wire fence, it won't work corectly as a ground wave propigating antenna. It will be too high, about a wavelength in the air!

Of course, there ain't much Ground Wave on 220 anyway!
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K4WYV on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I live in Gatlinburg, TN. The "220" band is very busy around here. Get away from alot of the interference. Alot of hams use the ADI AR-247 and the Alinco DR-235. Also seems like 220 will make it in areas that 2m will not from repeaters located on the same tower. So if you ask me you should purchase 220 gear.

73's
K4WYV
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by JGALT on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Why has there been only one other post about 222 MHz SSB?
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K7VO on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Cal, K4JSR:

I don't think we had the internet when the UPS fiasco happened. I remember it well and I was one of those who thought 222-225 was doomed. I didn't have any equipment for many years.

Anyway, while I was out in California in the mid 90s I picked up an old, used KDK FM-4033 (remember those?) and when I moved to NC in 1998 I still had it. There was virtually no activity on 222 back then (and I was out of range of Grifton) but it gradually increased. I think the fact that those of us on 222 talked about our activity on the band helped.

I guess that's the point of the article. A number of people have posted are, like you, in areas where there are good repeaters but little use. The key now is to have y'all connect and get on the air and talk about it.

The great irony here is that the local 222 machines are dead but ones to the north are active. The 224.16 in Dayton is linked to 145.11. I can't hit 145.11 from Cincinnati to save my life. I can hit 224.16 with no problem and that system seems more active than the local 2m machines. It's pretty pathetic that I was driving up I-75 from my home on Mt. Adams up to Fairfield and couldn't raise anyone locally on any repeater on any band but could have a really nice QSO by going through a Dayton machine.

73,
Caity
K7VO/8
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K7VO on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
JGALT: I don't know. I'm not on 222 SSB but that Elecraft transverter is awfully inviting.

73,
Caity
K7VO/8
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by W6TH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
.
John, my Beverage antenna at 500 feet come to 250 halfwave lengths. The wires sit at 8 feet above ground, which is what a Beverages should be.

Fourteen wavelengths, which is about 96 feet, a gain of some 8 dB. Just imagine 150 wavelengths at 20 dB of forward gain.

If Caity will talk to me, I may go for the 222 Mhz using my Beverage as a transmitting antenna. I think Caity and I could hit it off pretty good. What do you think John?

.:
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Vito, 8 FEET! Thats the better part of 2 wavelengths. Way too high!

As I'm sure Caity will tell you, wire antennas need to be no higher than a 1/4 wavelength (although she really means one-half wavelength). But, a ground wave Beverage antenna must be no higher than 1/32 wavelength.

Caity can do ANYTHING though -- she is invincible!
 
RE: Caity, you need to get real!  
by K4JF on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
<I have been a ham a lot longer than you, and I have seen the depression that sets into hams who have put so much time and energy into ham radio, thinking it will change their lives for the better, when they discover what a fundamentally flawed hobby it is. It won't, and can't, change your life.>

What an idiotic statement!! I've been licensed 30+ years, and it HAS changed my life. For example: my job had me moving often early on (before I retired and moved home). For a while, we averaged moving every 18 months! No matter where, I had an instant circle of friends, and good, insider info about my new community, by just giving a call on 2m or 75m. It made moving to a strange, new city much less strange. I have made friends all over the world, and had an opportunity to visit some of them. (More coming, I hope!)

I have also had many opportunities to be of service and help to other people, some in dire need, because of ham radio.

Somebody needs to open their brain and learn a little more about Amateur Radio, the world's greatest hobby/service. It anything is "fundamentally flawed", it is "somebody's" viewpoint!!! :o)
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
K4JF, I think you suffer this fool too lightly!
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by KC8VWM on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!

"I can't hit 145.11 from Cincinnati to save my life. I can hit 224.16 with no problem."

Odd, It's the other way around for me here in Columbus. The 145.11 Dayton / Columbus link on my side has been down for a while now but I can still get into Dayton by turning the Yagi due West. However, I can't get in on the 220 side at all whatsoever. Mabey it's my antenna.

220 seems very polular during the Dayton hamfest season in this area. I remember a few people using newly acquired 220 radios and getting on the 145.11 machine from the 220 side.

Great Article.

73 Charles - KC8VWM
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by KG6WLS on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
BFH, I counted the same reply NINE TIMES. What gives? You're 59 all the way!
73
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by W6TH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
.

John, do you think Caity can cook? The way to a man's heart is through his stomache.

I wonder what the interview was about? Caity didn't say.


.:
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I don't know Vito but, a song lyric from Joni Mitchel (another ardent socialist) comes to mind. She said, "I'm a pretty good cook, and I'm sitt'n on my grocery's"

I think we might be getting as bad as Cal and the other three horsemen!
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by KC8VWM on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
"The way to a man's heart is through his stomache."

I suppose this would reasonably explain my regular attendance at Dayton. I often find the grand culinary festival of hotdogs on display to be a most delightful and uplifting experience.
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K7VO on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
To answer a few off topic questions:

The interview was about a new job, or more correctly a new contract through the same consulting company I have been working for here in Cincinnati I have been working for. Yes, I landed the new contract and start on Monday. It should eventually lead to a permanent position with the client company which would be an excellent career move for me.

Yes, I cook. That is one hobby I place above ham radio. If I ever were to change careers I'd become a chef. I enjoy it that much. Am I any good at it? You'd have to ask my boyfriend :) BTW, did anyone else catch the new Iron Chef America? For the first time ever there is a woman who is an Iron Chef. She also (just barely) won her first battle.

On topic comments:

It's been my experience too that 222 repeaters seem to have slightly better range than 2m when all else is equal. I'm glad a couple of people mentioned it. No, I can't explain it. From what I understand of VHF propagation theory it should be the other way around but it isn't. It does seem to be very common that the best 222 machine in a given area has better coverage than any 2m machine in the same area but far less traffic.

How far is Columbus from Dayton? I'm wondering if its farther than Cincinnati. Other than that I can't explain why 224.16 would have better coverage south than east. It could be antenna pattern or terrain or any of a number of reasons. I don't know anything about the system other than it works well and seems to be busier than most in this part of the world. There are also a lot of friendly, good people on that system.

Dayton Hamvention: My work schedule will probably limit my attendance to Saturday and Sunday. I will be carrying an old Kenwood TH-31AT (with tone board installed) 222 HT (bought for $36 with lots of goodies on eBay last year) and if you tell me what frequencies folks are planning on for the Hamvention I can probably meet people on the air and in person.

73,
Caity
K7VO/8
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K7VO on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
It's late and I'm tired. Please pardon the redundant language and awful grammar in the second sentence of my last post. Translation: I am working for the same employer but for a different client. I had to interview with that client.

Now everything should be as clear as mud.

G'night.
Caity, K7VO
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Test
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Test
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Caity, I have an article in the que that should help to explain the manner by which 220 works better than 144 MHz.

I also am, and have been, working on some experiments to establish 'bandwidth vs. noise level' considerations for Single Sideband compared with (or opposed to) very, very, very narrow deviation FM. The key is very good noise limiting (70 dB's minimum) and a good balance of modulation index vs. slope factor of the receiver’s bandpass.

73! You seem to be able to handle the serious, and the humorous rather well! de John
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K4JF on April 12, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
<K4JF, I think you suffer this fool too lightly! >

>Chuckle<.... maybe. You do have to wonder why someone who is so against something is still partaking! I just felt like setting the record straight, in case someone is reading who is interested in becoming a ham.
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by N6AYJ on April 12, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I'm still "partaking" because I just like to B.S. with my buddies. I know it is all B.S., and I don't take it seriously. If I were suddenly unable to B.S. with them via the ham radio, I would find some other way to do it. And, omigod, to even SUGGEST that anybody would try to find a romantic interest in ham radio! The thought sickens! And makes one inquire, "How, exactly, do two really obese people make love? Inquiring minds want to know."
 
Literally Oozing  
by KA4KOE on April 12, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Oozing with class, doncha think?
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 12, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Like the Blob, or one of those really disgusting worm things you find in your garden, yuck!

What bands do worms hang out on? I'm guessing 80 at night, and 40 all day long.
 
Garden Slugs  
by KA4KOE on April 12, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Those disgusting things are slugs. You kill 'em by putting salt on them. The shrivel up and die real quick.

Too bad you can't solve most problems that easily---just throw salt at 'em.

And in that vein, do your research and consider the source.

It shall become clear, even to you, Grasshopper.
(say in pidgin Chinese voice, similar to that spoken in the old Kung Fu series).

PHILIP
 
220MHz  
by N0TONE on April 12, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I've avoided 222MHz FM because when I ask what kinds of QSOs you can have, the answer is, "Just like 2 meters and 440MHz!". I don't use either of those bands, because of the absence of interest in the QSOs that go on there.

Now, SSB/CW on 222, mobile, might be nice.

The price of the gear is a bit daunting, though. I can get a nice multi-mode, 9-band HF rig for about $40-50 per band, and the VHF and up stuff seems more like $100 to $150 per band - and it's less power. Someone's sure making a lot of bucks there!

AM
 
RE: 220MHz  
by K7VO on April 12, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I find the quality of QSOs on 222 generally better than 2m simply because it takes a bit more effort to get there. OTOH, I've had really good technical discussions on 2m FM as well. There are interesting QSOs everywhere. Just politely bow out of the dull ones and change frequencies.

222 equipment is more expensive for good reason. You don't have the economies of scale you have on HF and 2m. It's not a ham band in Japan or Europe or much of anywhere else outside of region 2. It's a small niche market even in the U.S. and Canada. If it costs more to produce for that reason you are going to pay more.

Your cost per band has to be higher. There are three VHF bands compared to nine HF bands. At UHF the circuitry has to change considerably. This is especially true for UHF bands above 70cm. There are four UHF bands, only one of which is popular in the U.S. and one more which is popular in Japan. Again, economies of scale play in.

A Yeasu FT-817 ($589 at R&L Electronics) has sales figures in the six digits over the past five years. It may, in the not too distant future, surpass the FT-101 series for the best selling ham rig ever. The FT-101 sold in excess of 300,000 units. How many of the most popular 222 rig today have been sold?

73,
Caity
K7VO/8
 
RE: 220MHz  
by JGALT on April 12, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
222 MHz transverters are available from companies such as Downeast Microwave. and SSB Electronics. The cost is minimal for very high quality engineering.

You might find less expensive transverters from Hamtronics etc but, I think that would be penny wise and pound foolish. You won't find better front-end design or power amplifiers than those on board the SSB and similar transverters.

Any 6 or 10 Meter radio makes a good I.F. for such transverters. The IC706, or FT100D may be quite desirable because all switching, and ALC controls are readily available from a radio that can make a nice "All Band Package" if you later want to add further transverters at 33, 23, or 13 centimeters etc. It would be quite easy using such a transceiver to have a compact packaged station that would work on all bands from 160 Meters up through our top bands.
 
RE: 220MHz  
by NB3O on April 12, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
The folks on 222 SSB around here are similar to what 160 meters used to have some 30 odd years ago. Mostly experimenters, homebrewers, and above all, gentlemen. Once most of the 1980's stock rigs and amps added 160 on the bandswitch, the personality of the Top Band really changed. Just thinking out loud.........
 
RE: 220MHz  
by NS6Y_ on April 12, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Caity I was out at our local monthly fun event, AmTech Day, and not only had I just bought an 817, but two people I talked to had also picked one up that day!

Very very neat little rig!! Not perfect but nothing is, the fun factor is so high that who cares, you can tell the ham who just got an 817, they can't wipe the silly smile off of their face.

Yaesu/standard/vertex sure make some good stuff, maybe it's the commercial radio pedigree.
 
RE: 220MHz  
by NS6Y_ on April 12, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
OK that's it! That's the final straw!!

I'm voting they change the name of the Dayton hamfest to "The Culinary Festival Of Hotdogs" who's with me????
 
RE: 220MHz  
by JGALT on April 12, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I first got on 220 on a net in Southern California in the 1960?s. It was called the ?RagN?Tech Net?. Some guys ran ?AM?, and a few ran FM. They used radios that for the most part they had built themselves. Some modified 2 Meter radios, or older military equipment. For me, a fairly new Ham, it was a wonderful world of knowledge and ideas. I cherish those days and nets!

Best regards, John
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 12, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
NB3O, you sound like someone that I would enjoy having long QSO’s with!

You, as do I, admire those old timer’s who you had conversations with on 160 Meters. You appreciate good manners, while acknowledging that they have nearly vanished. You like 220!

You are a bit of a youngster, having been born 2 years after Sputnik, and 4 after the opening of Disneyland, yet I think, you are my kinda guy!
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by N6AYJ on April 13, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Well, at least I have enough common sense not to keep ferrets as pets.
 
817s vs. 807s Addenda  
by KA4KOE on April 13, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Either way you got a dumb grin on your face.
<BELCH>

Gimme another, barkeep. Time to visit AES again
(Amateur Ethanol Supply).

PHILIP
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WB9F on April 13, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Thank you, sir for all the nice comments abt the 220 band. As an owner of a 220 repeater, I really appreciate your comments. I have worked 220 for many years. The old timers always called 220 the quiet band. My repeater has been on the air for a few months now and I really didnt appreciate how quiet the band is till we had recent thunderstorms. Turning to the 2 meter repeater freq. I had numerous lightning crashes on the reciever but the ole 220 band was quiet as a mouse.

I invite any travelers coming thru Southern Illinois to check in on our 220 repeater at 224.860 pl 88.5

thanks for the 220 support and article.

Larry WB9F
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by NS6Y_ on April 13, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
What's wrong with ferrets? I visited a friend who has ferrets and they're CUTE! And they're really fun, kinda like kittens when they're in that playful stage.......
 
Ferrets  
by KA4KOE on April 13, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Ferrets are illegal in Ga. Nevertheless, a friend of mine had one. The ferret would run around making happy noises and then he'd ride on top of the dog. The ferret and the dog were big buddies.
 
RE: Ferrets  
by K7VO on April 13, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Ferrets are NOT illegal in Georgia. They may have been at one time but they most certainly are not now. They are legal in every state except Hawaii and California. One thing I follow closely are so called "Ferret Free Zones" (the abovementioned states, New York City, Washington DC) and ferret legalization efforts. If there were a current ban in Georgia I'd know about it.

73,
Caity
K7VO/8
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K7VO on April 13, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
NS6Y: Ferrets are cute and funny and very intelligent. As you saw they often get along very well with dogs. They are, however, incredibly high maintenance pets. Keeping ferrets is a hobby that makes ham radio look downright inexpensive.

A typical ferret will have one major illness requiring surgery during their lifetime, typically anywhere from 6 to 10 years. The average cost of that major illness will be around $1000. Ferrets are social animals and unless you have lots of time to spend with them and keep them happy you are looking at having a group of two or three, called a business. Do the math. Things add up in a hurry.

The little weasels get very bonded to their owners and want time with YOU. Plan on 3-4 hours a day with ferrets.

Ham radio is easy by comparison.

73,
Caity
K7VO/8
 
RE: 220  
by N2LC on April 13, 2005 Mail this to a friend!

Every so often I get out my old TH-315 and see if I can bring up any of the Columbus (Ohio) machines, and never can. There are supposedly 4 of them here, and were still coordinated as of Dec 04.

This conversation, or most of it anyway, belongs on the air!

It should be had on 2 meters. It should be had on 3895 and 7030 and 14260!

Maybe I'll go home and lurk around on 3895 and see if anyone shows up......

 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by KJ7XJ on April 13, 2005 Mail this to a friend!

Hi -

Real good artcle! I started using 220Mhz the first minute of the Novice Enhancment. I waited for the clock to stike 0000 UTC on that summer day in 1987, I keyed down my TH-31AT and KB6MND was on the air (223.78) from Redondo Beach, CA. Since that time that little repeater has gone from sitting in a garage to being the WALA system with linked 220Mhz repeates all over California (see www.wala.org).
I was so excited to be able to talk instead of using code as a Novice that I quickly upgraded to Technician and then General. It was all becasue of the 220Mhz band!
Im now in the Seattle/Tacoma area and there are only a handful of 220 machines. I borrowed a standard 2/220 HT and gave it a try. I was able to bring up 2 machines and gave my call out a number of times in the few days I had the rig. I never got any response. It was frustrating but I would still buy a 220 HT regardless. I still have family in CA and make frequent trips. NoCal and SoCal has every pair filled up and most are used around the clock. If you live in a non-active area like me, make it active. Get into 220! its a blast...

KJ7XJ - Eric Seattle/Tacoma, WA
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by WA6BFH on April 13, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
BoyO’boy, all this talk about Ferrets! Caity, you should rent the movie, “The Big Labowsky”! So, are Ferrets your main hobby? Where does ‘Tree Hugging’ fit in on a kind of 1 to 10 scale (10 being best)? I’m sorry but, I just couldn’t resist asking!

As far as Novices on 220, I thought that whole thing was a rather curious ‘social experiment’. You see, I own several repeaters (and Remote Base Stations). Novices also gained access to 23 cm at the same time. One day, when I was actually up at my 1200 MHz machine, I heard a couple of kids, probably in their late teens on that that system. I listened for a while I was doing other things, and their input signals were actually quite helpful.

One finally asked, “gee I wish we knew who owned this repeater” -- the MCW ID’er had ID’ed several times before he asked. I picked up the local microphone and told them it was my repeater. They were apologetic, and asked if it was Ok to use it. I told them it was an open machine, and that they were welcome. I did suggest that they should really be good enough at Morse code though, to know that. Shoot, they could have just looked it up by frequency!

If these kids had JUST been more astute as to what they were doing, and assured me that they were reasonably responsible, I would have given them some (secondary) control codes to do some interesting things. In hind sight, that being several years ago, I am though not now surprised. These days there are many Extra’s that I would not grant such privileges to. Although, there are several responsible Technician’s that have primary privileges!
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by KA4KOE on April 13, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
35 WPM + Card Carrying / Vibroplex Wielding Extra and Derned proud of it!!!
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by NS6Y_ on April 13, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I'm sure not able to do any 35WPM but I sure hope to get up to that speed someday!
 
RE: 220MHz  
by N0TONE on April 14, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
K7VO wrote:

"I find the quality of QSOs on 222 generally better than 2m simply because it takes a bit more effort to get there."

Very good point. It takes even more effort to be effective on 80 meters, or 40 meters, or any band on CW, and in my experience, it shows in the calibre of the QSOs.

"OTOH, I've had really good technical discussions on 2m FM as well. There are interesting QSOs everywhere. Just politely bow out of the dull ones and change frequencies. "

I'd done that, generally changing frequencies to 40/80/160 CW.

"222 equipment is more expensive for good reason. You don't have the economies of scale you have on HF and 2m. It's not a ham band in Japan or Europe or much of anywhere else outside of region 2. It's a small niche market even in the U.S. and Canada. If it costs more to produce for that reason you are going to pay more. "

I think you've done a great analysis here. To complete the marketing analysis then, since the equipment costs more to produce, it must somehow offer a higher value to the prospective purchaser. From the purchaser's perspective, the question is "what added benefits will I realized, having paid more per band, than an HF rig?". I believe for most people, the answer is "not enough added benefit to justify the higher price", and that's why there are fewer users of 222 than most other bands. It's no more complicated than straight-out supply, demand and cost/benefit ratio analysis, which we do every day.

"Your cost per band has to be higher."

Exactly. And to most users considering a purchase, the entertainment value per band must be higher, in order to justify paying the higher price.

The cost that a manufacturer endures is driven by technology. The cost that a user is willing to pay is driven by the perceived benefits that they gain by spending money. A sale is not made unless the two conditions meet somewhere at a happy medium.

One can justify all day long why a thing cannot be manufactured for a low price, but you don't get market acceptance by complaining about cost of manufacture. You get market acceptance by a presentation of the benefits to be had. "You're asking me to pay a higher price per band. This is a hobby. What extra benefits will I enjoy, having paid more per band?"

Good discussion!

AM
 
RE: 220MHz  
by JGALT on April 14, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I don't understand the "takes more trouble" statement at all!

What makes it more difficult?

Why would it be any more difficult to installing or using a 1.35 Meter FM radio than installing or using a 2 Meter FM radio. They work the same.

If you close your eyes, when you pick up the microphone, you won't know the diffeence!
 
RE: 220MHz  
by K7VO on April 14, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
To try and answer both JGALT and N0TONE, both of whom raise good points:

I am saying that the benefits of 222MHz are greater than those of 2m FM. A comparison with 160, 80, or 40 isn't valid because it's apples and oranges. For local mobile and handheld communication it's 160 and 80 aren't well suited, particularly on a summer's day due to noise levels and the size of antennas needed.

Yes, a 222 rig sounds like a 2m rig. Yes, the installation is the same. Most of us won't do just 222. It's a band most people add to an existing installation and that is where more effort comes in. There is also, as already described, a somewhat higher cost. Good used $50 2m FM rigs are everywhere. Good used 222 rigs cost two to three times as much. If you're adding a band you may want to think about dual or triband antennas, duplexers or triplexers, etc... It really is more effort.

Having said that I just picked up a very clean, boxed Yaesu FT-311RM (used) for right around $150. I could just run it, ignore 2m, and use an inexpensive monoband antenna. A Hustler SF-220 is a perfectly good mobile antenna that retails for about $15. A 3/8" threaded trunk lip mount costs no more than that. If I could be happy with just 222MHz then, yes, it could be as simple as 2m.

Based on my recent travels a 222MHz only mobile installation really does make sense but as I do have some friends who don't have the band I probably will leave 2m or 6m in the car as well.

73,
Caity
K7VO/8
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K7VO on April 14, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
KJ7XJ: I still have a Kenwood TH-31AT with the TU-6 tone board installed. It works brilliantly. It's a good old HT that sells for under $40 on the used market, possibly less without the tone board. It's still a great way to start on the band if you have good local repeaters with excellent coverage.

I'll be using my TH-31AT at Dayton this year. A bunch of my friends and I will be on simplex at the Hamvention. There are a group of us from NC, SC, and VA who always use 222 simplex at major hamfests.

I haven't been to a hamfest since Shelby last year, BTW. I'm really looking forward to Dayton.

73,
Caity
K7VO/8
 
RE: 220MHz  
by WA6BFH on April 14, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I have a rather difficult time with the idea of 220 being more difficult as well!

The only difficulty is in the CHOICE, at the time you either purchase or build an operative station installation. If that choice is difficult for you, well I guess that I then understand the dilemma -- it is a personal problem!

If at the outset of entering Ham radio you resolve that you plan to be active on all bands anyway, it is only a choice as to what or which one first, second, third etc.

I don’t think that should be THAT HARD!
 
RE: 220MHz  
by NS6Y_ on April 14, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Caity why not do an article here on how to get on 220, with both new and used rigs, apparently there are a lot of really good 220 rigs out there that can be bought at the hamfests etc very cheaply, and I don't think they ever made a bad Kenwood :-)

A run-down by model of used rigs with 220 capability would be GREAT!
 
RE: 220MHz  
by W5ESE on April 14, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Thanks for taking the time to write the nice article. Don't
let the naysayers discourage you from writing more.

I've never had any 220 MHz equipment, though will consider
it for a future project. 6 meter capability will be my
next project.

73
Scott W5ESE
 
RE: 220MHz  
by WA6BFH on April 15, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Below is a list of suppliers of currently available all mode 222 MHz equipment. The pricing is good for excellently engineered radios! While prospects for some used equipment are available, I usually suggest new radios, as it provides a better ‘hit the ground running’ attribute, as well as helping Ham radio at large!

http://www.elecraft.com/

http://www.ssbusa.com/

http://www.downeastmicrowave.com/Catalog.htm


73! de John


 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K8MHZ on April 15, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Caity,

Great article.

If you want some real entertainment do a search on N6AYJ. The guy is a stitch, you should read his letters to the FCC. He tells everyone how bad ham radio is but can't stay off it himself. I know he likes it, but he likes ruffling feathers even more.

Let the search result speak for itself.

73, (You too Bill)

Mark K8MHZ
 
RE: 220MHz  
by K8MHZ on April 15, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Wow...

How did I get up there? (look at date)

I don't mind being next to John...really.
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by AB0SF on April 15, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
What a relief it is to read an encouraging post. 222 is by far, is the Amateur Service's best band. With propogation similar to 144 MHz and noise floor characteristics similar to 440 MHz, it's always defied me (aside from the lack of equipment) why this band doesn't see more use.

By the way, if you ever find yourself within 70 miles of the WWV transmitter site (Fort Collins, CO), give 224.520 a try. Constant PL of 100.0 Hz. Can't make it out here and have IRLP access? Give node 3902 a call. There are still a couple of us lingering about from time to time.

George, AB0SF
 
RE: 220MHz  
by NS6Y_ on April 16, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Oh man an Elecraft K2 with an Elecraft 222 transverter..... :-D
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by N2MWE on April 16, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
It's good to see someone using a band that's not in the mainstream...I have an Icom 3SAT, and here in lower NYS, there isn't much activity on 220. Mount Beacon has a nice machine I can talk into fifty miles south with an HT.

We need more hams like you, Caitlyn!
 
RE: 220MHz  
by WA6BFH on April 16, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Alex, a K2 and 220 transverter, does that make you feel warm all over?
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by W7HW on April 18, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Hi Caitlin,

Interesting topic, in particular all the response you have received. In the Pacific Northwest, I don't see a lot of activity in the SSB portion that I use. However; a small group in the area are trying to generate some activity on SSB. Been sparce so far, but still trying to get the people out of the woodwork beyond contest/sprint activity.

I can't comment on repeater activities here, I am told there are some, but my prototype antenna is designed for 222.100 mhz only, so I haven't dialed around yet. I have to mention this band is new to me at the present time.

Reading some of the commentary, activity in various areas is good on FM, as you described and others have mentioned. I run a 736R on the SSB mode only, so maybe I will have to expand my horizons....73 w7hw Duane
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by K7VO on April 19, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
NS6Y: Your idea is a good one. Of course if I try to do that I'll inadvertantly leave out somebody's favorite. Still, as time permits I'll try and do some research and see what I come up with.

73,
Caity
K7VO
 
A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by KI4OG on April 22, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Very good to hear that 220 is now getting some respect. Back In the 80's I built three 220 repeaters here in Nashville TN. We had a small group that used them alot. Mostly tech heads would use 220 to get away from the not so tech hams, you know that ones tha can't put a pl259 on a cable. I always believed that 220 never got the respect it deserves.. 220 has the ability to act like 2m and 440 at the same time in that it will go through walls and around corners better than the other bands. I have always believed its the best band for FM repeater use. You know what is said about "use it or lose it".. Give it a try, you'll like it..

thank
73
KI4OG
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by N6AYJ on April 23, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
"...do a search on N6AYJ... He tells everyone how bad ham radio is but can't stay off it himself."

I don't get your point. As I previously stated, I like to B.S. with my buddies on the radio. That doesn't mean that I: (1) take ham radio seriously; (2) approve of the way the Commission is running the amateur service; or (3) that I think all hams are swell.
 
220, the best kept secret of ham radio IMHO  
by KD4EVB on May 7, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
THe 220/222 band is one of the best kept secrets of ham radio. Rural range of 2m, urban penetration of 440 all in one very nice uncongested band. Add in the fact that you don't have all the RF alley issues of 2m and 440 in most areas, you'll often find that it's more reliable than either 2m/440 due to being cleaner spectrum.

It's also a great band for phone patches, the average scanner doesn't cover 220, grin. While nothing on ham bands is to be considered private, 220 is a lot more private than 2m/440.

We've used it for discrete voice comms and a lot of our packet data links for many years. In my high IMD area (I live in the paging capital of USA, grin) we found all things being equal, we get better range with it than 2m and the propagation over long haul paths is more stabile.

Used to be lack of gear was one of the things holding back 222 (there is no 220 band in Japan so it kind of limits the market for those manufacturers). Nowadays there is a ton of FM handheld and mobiles available offering good performance and nice prices.

222 is just a really nice piece of underutilized spectrum, unfortunately too many hams think HF and 2m FM is all there is to ham radio. Considering we live in a extremely spectrum hungry world, I'd expect that we're going to loose 220, 902, and 1200 MHz before too many more years pass...the writing is on the wall.

Of course consider the ssb/cw aspect of 220. Transverters can be found new for around $400 and used for a lot less.

On 220 FM and SSB you'll find some nice quality ops that have moved there to get away from the insanity of 2m/440 FM.
 
RE: 220, the best kept secret of ham radio IMHO  
by WB5YYX on May 9, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
KD4EVB-

I am totally with you my friend! I have been advocating more Amateur Radio participation of all kinds for years on 220/now 222 MHz. While it is now exclusively an Amateur Radio frequency allocation, the Lord giveth and the Lord can take it away! We have loads of equipment for 1.25 meters. When the financial means are available, I am going to put up a 222 MHz repeater here! I would also like to include on a separate 222 MHz repeater Echolink and IRLP. One would have to have a separate repeater even out here in God's country so those modes would be available 24/7. This way it would not interfere with routine FM communications on a separate 222 MHz repeater. I have a Yaesu FT-736R with 220/222 MHz module and a Kenwood TH-F6A HT with 222 MHz. Mountainair, New Mexico (75 miles SouthEast of Albuquerque) is extremely rural with farms,ranches and lots of open land! Perfect for this area and many others. It's not going to happen unless we make it happen! Thanks for the positive inspiring post!

Best 73's,

Bob WB5YYX
Licensed since 1967
Life Member ARRL, QCWA
New Mexico Radio Collectors Club
Member Antique Wireless Association
Former ARRL Rocky Mountain Division Vice-Director 1990-1994
Charter Member Estancia Valley ARA
Volunteer Examiner ARRL/W5YI since 1985
ARES
 
Dayton  
by N2LC on May 19, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Okay, Dayton people.. Where are we going to congregate?

223.50?

I'm one of those guys that never carries his geeky radio around on his belt. So if I take my geeky radio with me, some of you better be there....

If I can get my stepson out of bed, We should be there by 9 or 10 on Saturday.

Hope to see you on 220.

Lee
 
RE: Dayton  
by K7VO on May 21, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Actually, it's been 223.78 for me and a number of other people.

To/from I'm usually on the 224.16 repeater but I also had a nice QSO on 224.72 this evening.

73,
Caity
K7VO
 
RE: A Road Trip on the 222 MHz Band  
by KB2CWA on July 17, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Thanks for the great article. I went out and bought an Alinco DR-235T for my truck. Can't wait to put it in. Anyone on in the Albany NY area?

73
Aaron
KB2CWA@aaronconnors.com
 
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