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[Articles Home]  [Add Article]  

Radio Go Box

David Schornak (N1IB) on February 4, 2007
View comments about this article!


A radio go box

Or portable emergency communications

By

David P Schornak

N1IB

I have seen lists and stories of what a good amateur radio operator should have in his go kit go. These lists make suggestions as what type of radios to put in your go kit, of course everyone knows with each radio there are cables and other supporting things to pack too.

Now when you get to where you are going everything needs to be set up and connected with all those cables that you packed. This setup takes time and when you break it all down you have to pack it all up and there is always that feeling in the back of your mind that you forgot to pack that one cable that makes all your equipment work. However what if there was a way to build a portable ham shack. This shack once assembled would have all the cables and radios and tnc's mounted in it, already wired and ready to go. This is what led me to build my radio go box (figure 1). What is in the box?

1) Yaesu FT-857D.

2) Kenwood TM-D700.

3) Kantronics KAM+ tnc.

4) Kantronics KPC3+.

5) Alinco DM-330MV.

6) LDG Electronics Z-100 auto tuner.

7) 2 12-volt muffin fans for cooling.

8) West Mountain 4008 rig runner.

9) All the interconnection cables and mics.

10) Computer cables to control everything.

As you can see from the list this radio go box is a ham shack in a box. Yes there is other things that you could put in yours or things I could have done differently in mine. What I am saying is this is not the end all of radio go boxes but it is a good point for anyone to get an idea where to start. So with that being said here is how I built mine.

I started with a gator 6unit shallow rack mount box. (http://www.gatorcases.com/productsmodeldetail.aspx?LID=1&PID=18&MID=11) and added to it three rack mount shelves. I bought some aluminum angle for making brackets for mounting all that equipment in the box.

I took the bottom off the power supply. Then using this bottom as a template, I centered the bottom plate in the middle of one of the rack shelves and drilled 4 holes for sheet metal screws to go through the shelf through the rubber feet and into the metal base plate that mounts on the bottom of the power supply. On the same shelf I cut two pieces of 1.5”x 2”x5” aluminum angle and mounted them on each side of the power supply one piece is for external Anderson power pole connectors and the other is for uhf bulkhead connectors for the antennas.

0x01 graphic

(Figure 2)

The next shelf up has mounting points for two fans the TM-D700 display and this shelf will have the antenna tuner and the KPC3+ mounted on it. I use two pieces of

Member Comments:
This article has expired. No more comments may be added.
 
Radio Go Box  
by NXET on February 4, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Well it has all the suffings in it. Why are you running the antennas out the front when the back will come off from the mfgrs specs. Why waist the power on two fans? when one in back will do.

Might want to think about putting the speakers into the front cover. which then could be attached to the top of the case backwards. Oh and put a couple of LED lights on it too.

Antenna wire and cable can be attached to the back cover to make it complete.

Front should have a fold down cover for a place to put the key, writing info, etc. Two cables one on each side.
hing pin at the bottom of the case to make it stay put.

these are not new. In WW2 they field radios were packed into footlocker cases with their own legs to set them up on. The door of the footlocker then became the writing, key table when opened.

Good idea but, a little busy looking from the pictures which shows it setting flat instead of tilting up for the operator.

Keep up the good work though.
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by NXET on February 4, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
I knew I had seen this before when I was rooting around in the archives looking for something. Check out WA6CDE's article
http://www.eham.net/articles/11357

He has the same thing but more orginized. I wonder if it was ever built as it shows a drawing. Wonder what happend to him. Dont see any posts after. You guys run him off?

One speaker will work if you have a summing amp that has multipul inputs. Also I don't see where any key, headphones or microphone connections are at. I have a LED bar graph for power voltage and current useage. Much more rugged than meters. I use mine in the motorhome. Got them from Digikey $9.00 each. with expanded scale so we can see 13.8 volts, range is 12.6 to 14.5 v dc. Amp scale is from 0-30. I have one also for 120 volts AC but don't use it anymore as I use a switching power supply (Astron SS-30) which runs multi voltage and frequency for my EOS kit.
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by K0BG on February 4, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
It appears we didn't get the whole article, as the last sentence ends abruptly. My question is, how do you power it all?

Over the years, I've seen several dozen similar set ups. Some of them look like a rat's nest, and some of them look exceedingly professional. In almost every case, the weak link was the power supply.

Batteries, with or without a battery booster, have limited on-site time without some form of backup. Be that a generator, solar panel, or what have you. The more equipment you power the more critical the backup becomes.

For example, the back of this case comes off which should allow enough air flow to keep things cool, negating the need for fans. It would also allow the coax cables to come out the back where they're out of the way.

Perhaps these are minor nits, but they are food for thought as your project matures.

Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com
 
My emergency 'go box' HF kit.  
by W8KQE on February 4, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Excellent article, considering many Hams are putting these portable kits together in case of an emergency, or just for their own portable fun use (or both). My portable 'hamshack in a box' simply consists of an Icom IC-718, an LDG Z-100 tuner (interfaces perfectly with the 718), a CW paddle, thin 8X coax runs and 'jumpers', and a few PAR End-Fed wire antennas to cover 40, 20, and 17 meters. All this easily fits into a lightweight metal camera case slightly bigger than a briefcase. For power, I use a portable rechargeable 'Prestone' battery car charger/power supply which supplies ample power to run the rig all day. Great for camping or 'patio DXing'! I should look into some kind of solar cells for recharging the battery for true emergency power independence (this would take a while) though.
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by K8MHZ on February 4, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
"Wonder what happend to him. Dont see any posts after. You guys run him off?"

GM (or the person using that GM's call) got banned for posting filthy remarks about people and their families. GM tried to come back as Greta.

We call self contained portable units 'field stations' and have exercises a few times each year where we set them up in parks and make contacts.

Great fun! We also have informal timings to see how fast a station can be set up.
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by WA1RNE on February 4, 2007 Mail this to a friend!


I like the concept with the Gator case, but I have a few suggestions for better reliability and functionality:


>Consider a different power supply. The Alinco DM-330 isn't the supply I would rely on for reliability in an emergency application. I would use a reliable commercial version from a quality power supply OEM or one from a reliable amateur OEM like Icom, Kenwood, etc.


> Consider a different mounting location for the power supply, like on the back cover. The power supply is currently mounted up front and underneath a radio. The power supply heatsink should be unobstructed and it's heat not radiating/conducting to the chassis of a tranceiver, which can have some obvious detrimental affects for the radio. Mounting the supply on the back panel will require some forced ventilation for the case. This will require adding an air inlet and filter on one side or on the front panel and an exhaust outlet on side of the case, providing cross flow through the case. This is one way to do it, there are other possibilities.

> Making these changes will also free up space on the front panel. The fans will be gone (or at least one of them) as well as the power supply.


> In place of the power supply, add a good public service scanner with trunk tracking capability.


> Add a panel for headphone and/or mic jacks for each radio, as well as any other non-power interfaces.


Good luck. This is a fun project that is very worthwhile.


WA1RNE
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by KF4YNZ on February 4, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Great article, thank you. I too have been researching using the 19 inch 'DJ' sound equipment racks/cases for a field station. Gator makes one with a retractable handle and wheels, much like the Pelican 1440.

My question for the group is has anyone used any of the power conditioners used by the music/recording industry that are made to fit the 19 in cases? A link to one is provided: http://www.furmansound.com/products/international/products/int_pro/blncd/balanced1.php or http://www.performanceaudio.com/media/pdf/79/9682_s.pdf.

It seems to me that this would be a good AC filter, especially when using generators in the field that may not be putting out the cleanest power. This was a big problem for me during my time in Iraq. Thanks for you advice.
 
Radio Go Box  
by KG4HXI on February 4, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Looks like David has a more complete article at http://www.n1ib.com/page39.html.
 
Radio Go Box  
by SSB on February 4, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
This is a prime example why I don't buy used radios.

Alex....
 
Radio Go Box  
by N0AH on February 4, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
I think this is a good set up for you. But do you think other hams could operate it to it's full potential in case you're not there? Why or why not?
 
Radio Go Box  
by N8EMR on February 4, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Now thats the kind of box I had mentioned in http://www.eham.net/forums/EmergencyCommunications/3360 but that box layout is a bit messy. Prefer a much more planned look.
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by W6TH on February 4, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
.

February 4, 2007 GM WA6CDE was his last lookup and is still operational in ham radio.

Porbably gave up on eHAM and QRZ.COM and settled down working friends and mostly dx. Smart guy.

.:
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by NS6Y_ on February 4, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
OK count me as Impressed!
 
Radio Go Box  
by N0IU on February 4, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
A couple of questions:

What kind of computer are you using with this?

What software packages are you using?

Why are you using a KPC3 and a KAM+ when the Kam+ already has a VHF/UHF TNC already built into it?

Your website says you would like to have an SCS PTC unit. Are you really willing to spend anywhere from $888 to $1248 for one of these units just to do email during those extrememly rare times when you will actually be out in the field?

Also, it appears as if you haven't given much thought as to how you will run this thing if commercial power is not an option other than to say it CAN run off of 12 volts. Without battery power, you have a very nice 35 lb boat anchor. If you don't plan on carrying a battery with you, at least have a heavy duty cable with large alligator clips so you can hook up to a automotive/marine battery. Regardless of how you power the box, you need to carry several spares of every type and amperage of fuse.

You also need to carry a basic tool set or at the very least a Leatherman-type device. You also need to carry several spare connectors (antenna and power) as well as a butane soldering iron (and of course a couple of cans of butane).

Your website states, "We would like the box to be easy to set up so that anyone could set it up and get on the air quickly." That being the case, you should include quick reference guides like those from Nifty! Ham Accessories: http://www.niftyaccessories.com/ These are laminated and spiral bound booklets, 4.25 x 8 inches, providing simplified step-by-step instructions for all your radio’s features. I would also include a laminated wiring diagram of how this whole thing hooks together.

I would also suggest some sort of light. West Mountain Radio makes a light called the PWRbrite. It is low current, high output LED light that runs off of 11 to 25 VDC. At the very least, throw in handful of glow sticks.

Looks like you have a good start!

Scott N0IU





 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by KC0ROM on February 5, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
This is a good article which should give some of our Guru's food for thought on emergency communications go packages,as for having a kpc-3 and a kam-plus,sometimes it helps to have a backup for the backup. Some of you guys are too critical of others,what makes sense to some people is redundant to others.It is all good and at least the guy is expressing his thoughts on the subject.Don't criticize what he has done ,say ,have you thought about trying this ? Anyway the led lights are a great idea ,bright and use low current,gel cell batteries work well for my go pak,roll-up antenna's and don't forget a small tool pouch for quick fixes. just my two cent's worth. 73 kc0rom Scott
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by KQ6XA on February 5, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Nice setup! Good to see the photo of your go box. Do you have any more photos, such as the a view into the back with the rear door open? I like the way you have all connectors and power going in and out via the front. That makes it much easier to deal with in the field.

I saw the "gator6" rack on the website. Very nice. The case alone weighs 13 pounds... the whole package looks pretty heavy... it does have a lot of gear in it... how much does it weigh?

73---Bonnie VR2/KQ6XA
 
Radio Go Box  
by N0IU on February 5, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
I wasn't asking why he included a KAM+ and a KPC3 unit to be critical. I was asking because it appears that he is not using the VHF/UHF side of the unit and I was curious as to why.

On his website he states, "With the FT-857D connected to the KAM + we have the ability to do pactor 1 and other digital modes." and "The TM-D700 gives us a mobile radio with APRS capabilities and connecting it to the KPC-3+ gives us the ability to run telpac and do packet modes."

He says he is bought a KAM+ from eBay, so I am not entirely sure he knows exactly what the capabilities are of this unit. I have a KAM+ and I use it for doing HF digital modes with one radio and APRS or packet with another radio simultaneously. He doesn't mention anything about using it as part of a redundant system.

As the magazine at the supermarket checkout aisle says, "Inquiring Minds Want To Know!"

Scott N0IU
 
Radio Go Box  
by KB1GMX on February 5, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Pretty cool be all end all, whats the power source?

Sometimes you have to scale the equipment needed
to location, terrain, frequencies in used around
you. The most useful thing I bring to all events
is several HTs and spare batteries. Short range
point to point comms can be very handy for
logistical tasks during setup and ongoing
support.

Myself I took the path of making sure I have the
antenna, the needed antenna supports and power
sources packaged for portability all the way from
a 5500W generator, down to solar with batteries.
The idea is on short notice I can have antennas,
antenna supports, radios, cables and power in the
truck and moving in less than a half hour and still
insure I have what I need for the specific "event".
usually I also bring enough raw materials (cable,
wire, insulators and ropes to help others set up a
dipole for HF as well. The radios are the easy
part it's all about power sources and antennas.
I practice setting up the antennas and all even
in the winter.


Allison
KB1GMX
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by W4LGH on February 5, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
I designed my own "Portable/Go Box" around a Red Craftsman tool box. Radio ,speaker and mic mount on top with bungee cords, but are carried within the box.
In the box are 2 7amp gel-cells, my portable random 51" wire and mini-tuner, Parz endfed 20M wire, assorted jumpers and cables for hookup. The box has 2 flush mounted cigar power sockets for aux power connections, and the main power is fed into the box via powerpole connections. An assortment of tools and power connection conversions are carried in the tool tray. It was originally designed around my Yaesu FT-817 qrp radio, but has been replaced with a 100watt FT-857-D all band/mode. Has everything I have always need to setup and operate from ANY location, and the gel-cells can be charged while driving. A photo can be seen on my website, under the Virtual tour of my shack. The photo shows the FT-817 in place, but the FT-857D fits just as nice.

73 de W4LGH - Alan
Wbsite: http://www.w4lgh.com

 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by KD7GKE on February 5, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
As for the question on line conditioners, and similar boxes....As a guitarist, I like to use Musicians Friend...(www.musiciansfriend.com)...they have alot of rack mount equipment that can be used for us HAMS.

Happy hunting...

73's
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by KC8VWM on February 5, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
An idea I would like to share involves the idea of using 2 - 6VDC wired in series and placed inside the bottom outer pocket of a DVD player case.

Secondly I placed an FT 817 inside where a DVD player would normally be placed. There are Velcro straps to hold the equipment securely in place. The DVD player case also has two folding speakers sewn into it. When you unzip the case the speakers fold out from each side and they sound pretty good when connected to the FT 817. The DVD case is well padded (like a camera bag) to protect the radio equipment stored inside it from scratches, shock and vibration.

In addition there are a few pouches here and there for storing various coaxial adapters, an LED book reading light that can be mounted on the DVD case for illuminating the radio controls in the dark. Other zippered pouches are just perfect for storing the FT 817 user manual, ARRL pocket log book, notepad, pens etc.

I suppose a person could just place the entire DVD case thing inside a large ziplock bag and it would be completely waterproof. (lightweight too)

Here is the DVD player case I am using. It looks exactly like this one and an FT 817ND fits just perfectly inside it. The SLA batteries fit nicely in a zippered pouch compartment below the radio (DVD) compartment.

Check out the swanky speaker system. :)

http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?product_id=4232171

73 de Charles - KC8VWM
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by WA6RSV on February 5, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
My emergency setup is quite modest,I have an ELECRAFT KX1 with a 25 ft ground radial and 25 ft single wire antenna,30 ft of thin thread (so that I can tie to a rock and launch the wire) a Whiterook MK11 straight Key and some extra lithium AA batteries, EVERYTHING (including a copy of my license and the mini manual for the KX1 fits inside a Pelican 1060..a complete radio station in a box which I can take anywhere with me, that way if I am ever castaway I won't have to come up with a "Wilson" to talk to.

73
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by WA6RSV on February 5, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
My emergency setup is quite modest,I have an ELECRAFT KX1 with Ant tuner and 4 bands with a 25 ft ground radial and 25 ft single wire antenna,30 ft of thin thread (so that I can tie to a rock and launch the wire) a Whiterook MK11 straight Key and some extra lithium AA batteries, EVERYTHING (including a copy of my license and the mini manual for the KX1 fits inside a Pelican 1060..a complete radio station in a box which I can take anywhere with me, that way if I am ever castaway I won't have to come up with a "Wilson" to talk to.

73
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by NY2V on February 5, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Just a quick comment.. W4GLH -- FANTASTIC website!! Loved the photos of others' stations. Whole thing a real class act.
 
Radio Go Box  
by W1YW on February 5, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Rack mounted portable boxes are very common in professional audio, such as you see with performing bands. Of course almost no ham gear is designed anymore for rack mount (with a few key exceptions) but you can buy attachment kits to do it. Check out e-bay under 'rack mount audio' for example.

Nice article!

73,
Chip W1YW
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by K4LD on February 5, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
I think it is an okay idea. I don't think you will be too happy though when you find yourself in the middle of the woods and you dont have a power outlet.
 
Radio Go Box  
by AB0RE on February 5, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Great article! Although I'd do a few things differently, the article gave us all some good food for thought. I love these "How-To" articles as a refreshing break from the gripe / philosophical articles we normally see.

If you do an eBay search you can find the Gator box used for $99 shipped. I think it is available for a few bucks more from the website he bought the shelves at (musiciansfriend.com). He has all the links on his personal page (URL listed above).

As a side note, one can still get power supplies in a rack-mount configuration. Astron and Samlex both have models that fit the 19" racks. The Astron linear models can also be modified to safely float a deep cycle battery. The mod is listed at www.repeater-builder.com.

I'd probably also put the coax going out the back. I'd probably ditch the TNCs in my design, and instead make room for some supplies such as paper/pencils, log books, roll-up J-poles, coax, dipole antenna, etc. Also, I'd probably put make it easy to connect to an external battery and would have a battery booster (converts voltage to 13.8VDC to keep rigs happy) also mounted in the unit.

73,
Dan / ab0re
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by N4SHM on February 5, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
I think the power and antenna connections should have gone in the back of the case, therefore giving you more room in the front. In my opinion, the front could be re-aranged a little to give the case more aesthetic appeal, as it looks a little cramped and "shoved in" look.

Just some food for thought,

Sean
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by KX8N on February 5, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Looks like a good setup. No need to dig around in the back for connections - everything's right up front where you can get to it instantly. No need to even take the back off the case - you can keep the back closed up without fear of water, ice, or snow getting in. Good job!
 
Radio Go Box  
by N0IU on February 6, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
AB0RE wrote:

"As a side note, one can still get power supplies in a rack-mount configuration. Astron and Samlex both have models that fit the 19" racks. The Astron linear models can also be modified to safely float a deep cycle battery."

If you are going to go rack mounted, I like the idea of the Astron 30 Amp switching power supply SRM30M. It does weigh about 2.6 lbs more than the Alinco and costs $40 more ($190), but then again, it is an Astron! Astron's website shows an SRM30 (same thing but without meters), but I can not find a price for this.

Samlex does not seem to be an option in terms of rack mounting. They do have a 23 amp supply 1223R1 that is only 1.5 lbs heavier than the Alinco, but it costs $20 less ($130) and I would not suggest a 23 amp supply for this application anyway. The next thing they have is a 40 amp supply SEC40BRM, but this one has a battery backup, costs $400 and weighs 26 lbs so this one loses on all counts.

An alternative to the Alinco desktop power supply might be the Astron SS30M. It only weighs .5 lb more and costs only $10 more ($160) and again, it is an Astron.

While modifying an Astron linear power supply to float a deep cycle batter would be OK for home use, it really isn't an option in this case based on their weight. The 35 amp desktop supply weighs in at a hefty 27 lbs and the rack mounted 35 amp power supply tops the scales at 38 lbs.

KX8N wrote:

"No need to even take the back off the case - you can keep the back closed up without fear of water, ice, or snow getting in."

If you are going to be operating under these conditions, add a tent to the list of supplies!

Scott N0IU

 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by WA2JJH on February 6, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
A good artical and it looks nice. Of course everybody will have their own unique idea's of how they would construct there own. Good food for thaught.

Pelican,Haliburton,anvil and Calzone are all nice and provide "some degree" of shock protection.

I agree with an emergency generator too. Perhaps a small tool kit. A butane cordless soldering iron, and multimeter would be items that I would add.
One never knows when mean MR MURPHY is lurking.
I like those combo 20amp portable batts that have jumper cables to start a car as well as a limited backup power.

When 9/11 hit NYC, I had to run around and build a crummy makeshift go-box. One never knows when something will happen.
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by VK4JRC on February 6, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
The LAST TNC I would use is an SCS unit, would rather the KAM XL, even though it is big.
73s Jack VK4JRC
 
Radio Go Box  
by N1IB on February 6, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
yes this article is not complete i had the hole thing posted don't now how it got cut off but anyone wanting the whole article with all the pictures should to http://www.n1ib.com/page39.html there you will find more pictures and a more complete list
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by N1IB on February 6, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
no the radios are both mounted vertically in the back of the case so that the fans can blow driectly on them
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by N1IB on February 6, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
good points all and the tool kit and extra connectors are in my full go kit that i carry along with me as for the scs modem yes i am willing to spend the money as i am actually using this more than just the rare time i go into the field on a deployment. I use it hunting and i go down to hunting camp usualy for 3 weeks out of the season as for power it has the abilty to connect to 12 volts and i have the cable to connect to a car battery in the full jump bag that i carry the reference cards and setup instructions will be placed in the front cover of the box the computer is running hamradio deluxe also it has airmail winlink2000 on it.
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by VK4JRC on February 6, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Whilst I do not use WinLink, only use HF Packet with the 3 SCS Modems I have, the packet mailbox is crumby, it can only be accessed from the CMD prompt, not the PAC prompt, it is very basic and difficult to drive etc. The PTC-IIex manual is over 200 pages and rather hard to interpret, no quick start guide. The PTC-II Pro is worse :-( to use packet and gateway through it, you need 2 DSP add on modules.
Only by owning these modems do you really find out how hard they are to operate. I should have got KAM XL. However, the SCS is reputed to do WinLink very well......but its not what I got them for.
The DSP Tracker, great unit, but no mailbox at all, only does packet, no pactor. Good for APRS, but expensive when compared to Tiny Track etc. Oh yes, it has the horrible USB interface, which means you cannot use many older packet programs with it.
73s Jack VK4JRC
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by VK4JRC on February 8, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
I am thinking about making 2 boxes, one a HF one, the other a VHF/UHF one. Using battery power and charger for mains hookup, which would make one box too heavy, as a combined setup. Besides IF I make a separate setup and one box has a battery power problem, one box can be jumpered to the other. One box an ICOM 703 HF with TNC etc, the other with my D700 etc. Antennas HF are Buddipole, VHF/UHF Diamond SG7000a or similar.
HF TNC, probably a KAM, I have a couple of old KAM+ v8.0 units here, unless I use one of my SCS units :-)
The PC to drive the TNCs? I have a Psion 3mx with terminal program, likewise with a HP Jornada 720, which has 12 volt port to charge/run from.
Also have 2 10 watt solar panels, if needed.
I would probably run with a pelican box set up for the cases. I have everything else ready to build, except the cases.
73s

Jack, VK4JRC
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by N1XBP on February 9, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
"My question for the group is has anyone used any of the power conditioners used by the music/recording industry that are made to fit the 19 in cases?"

A little far back, but I wanted to say that I have power line noise, and I use Furman M8 and M8Ds in my racks. They work great. As good as my ICE noise filter anyway. Turns out the retractable lights on the M8D are rather handy, too.

 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by VK4JRC on February 12, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Alex,

I can buy "extra time" I have solar power, solar hot water, a diesel gen set (400 hours fuel) a windmill with bore and 4500 gallons storage, 20000 gallons rainwater storage, grow our own vegetables, have 24 camels and 5 cows on our 160 acres. My radio gear to call on, and see IF any other people are still alive, when the World is about to end :-)
This life has no guarantees.....no matter what you own!
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by WA2JJH on February 13, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Hey SSB. On 9/11/2001 us hams did not save the world.
HOWEVER WE DID PASS TRAFFIC FOR NYPD,EMS, AND MUCH MORE!

Perhaps having a building blow up 1 kilometer(.62 miles) in your face, will change your mind!
 
RE: Radio Go Box  
by WA2JJH on February 13, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Hey SSB. On 9/11/2001 us hams did not save the world.
HOWEVER WE DID PASS TRAFFIC FOR NYPD,EMS, AND MUCH MORE!

Perhaps having a building blow up 1 kilometer(.62 miles) in your face, will change your mind!
 
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