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Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among Neighbors:

from dailysouthtown.com on November 1, 2007
Website: http://www.dailysouthtown.com/news/628481,dst_hamradio_31.article
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Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among Neighbors:

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Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among Neigh  
by K8MHZ on November 1, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
I wonder how many of the supposedly Part 15 compliant devices are made in China?
 
RE: Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among N  
by KF7CG on November 1, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
The reporting on this one is a little less anti-Amateur than most, but it still tends to think that Amateur Radio is Broadcasting.

Further, they still seem to think that the FCC has a magic wand to make the Amateur (interference that is) go away.

No wonder there are interference problems the antenna is too low.

The key to this is how much interference there is in the home of the Amateur. If none, with the exception of the cable interference, then his station is clean.

The cable stuff most often arises from poor cable installations and poor cable maintenance. Once the signal gets into the cable because of a bad installation, the cable carries it everywhere and can even generate more signals to interfere.
 
Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among Neigh  
by VE3TMT on November 1, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
My antenna is a Cushcraft R7 with the base on a 15 foot pole just above the roof line. I cause no interference to any of the TV's in our house nor due I come across any audio equipment. I do interfere slightly with the phone but I think that is because the RG213 and the phone line are separated by inches at the entry point in the wall of the house. None of my neighbors have complained either.

So having a low antenna may not be the cause of the problem. Is he running an amp? How is the antenna grounded? Not to say it's his fault but it may be contributing to the problem. If people would stop buying their appliances at Wal-Mart, life would be a lot easier!

Max
VE3TMT
 
One ham's thoughts on this classic problem.  
by AI2IA on November 1, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
This appears in most respects to be the typical case of uninformed neighbors seeking to rid themselves of a ham neighbor because the cheaply made entertainment devices they enjoy no longer work the way they want them to. Even if it works out to exonerate the ham, Terry, his antenna will continue to be a visible reminder of the "pain" they feel about him.

One important point I think is this:
"While broadcasting may be his hobby, and he estimated he transmits "a couple hours" a day, Schroedle said ham radio operators can serve a vital function during emergencies that hamper other communications." - Of course, we know that broadcasting is not his hobby, but idea that he "transmits" a couple of hours a day seems far fetched. Probably his transceiver is powered on a couple of hours a day. If you consider your own ham activity, you realize that we actually key down very briefly. Most of our time is spent searching or listening except for thos occasional long rag chews. So, how much interference do they really get? I'm sure they get some, but I think that it is the sight of his antenna that extends the "pain" for them, thus proving that most of this neighborly unhappiness is psychological.

 
Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among Neigh  
by N9XCR on November 1, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
I don't know if this step has been taken already, but perhaps he should VERIFY the validity of their complaints. I'm not calling his neighbors liars, but you never know if they're making it up because they saw an antenna.

These situations, however, will continue to occur until the manufacturers are REQUIRED to make their products resistant, if not immune, to interference. The greed of CEOs and other execs is to blame here, not the operators who operate their stations properly.

My antenna would be just about invisible if it wasn't for the window line running from my loop to the roof. :)

Chris
N9XCR
 
RE: One ham's thoughts on this classic problem.  
by KF7CG on November 1, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Here is a cut from the article that says that maybe the neighbors have just selected a convenient target.

"One woman can't use her phone at times because the line is claimed by someone else's conversation, he said."

If it were the Amateur she would hear only one side and it would most probably sound like Donald Duck. This sounds like the case of a wireless home phone with a neighbors wireless phone on the same channel. Most of the older and some of the newer phones were bad about that.

 
Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among Neigh  
by KC9JHY on November 1, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
I believe it did say in the article he was willing to help out. It sounds like the neighbors don't want his help and just want him to go away so their cheap, crappy devices will just work.

-A
 
Extending a peace pipe.  
by AI2IA on November 1, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
In a situation like this I would do the following:
I would tell several, not one, neighbors who complain to keep notes for one full week noting the date, time and duration of the interference. I would tell them that I will compare their notes to my log for those seven days. It there is a correlation I will see what I can do to help them. If there is no corelation, then I am not the source of their interference. If they are unwilling to do this, then they are insincere and just want to get rid of ham operations. If they are willing to put this little time and effort into a solution, then I feel that I could work with them on that, and it would demonstrate to the FCC that I am acting in good faith.
 
RE: Extending a peace pipe.  
by W1RFI on November 1, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
This may help with some neighbors.

From : http://www.arrl.org/news/rfi/neighbors.html

What To Do if You Have an Electronic Interference Problem

This is a self-help guide for the consumer published jointly by the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), an organization representing Amateur Radio operators, and the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA).

Introduction

As our lives become filled with more technology, the likelihood of unwanted electronic interference increases. Every lamp dimmer, hair dryer, garage-door opener, radio transmitter, microprocessor-controlled appliance or remote-controlled new technical "toy" contributes to the electrical noise around us. Many of these devices also "listen" to that growing noise and may react unpredictably to their electronic neighbors.

Interference: What Is It?

Complex electronic circuitry is found in many devices used in the home. This creates a vast interference potential that didn't exist in earlier, simpler decades. Your own consumer electronics equipment can be a source of interference, or can be susceptible to interference from a nearby noise source. Interference can also result from the operation of nearby amateur, citizens band, police, broadcast or television transmitters.

The term "interference" should be defined without emotion. To some people, it implies action and intent. The statement, "You are interfering with my television" sounds like an outright accusation. It is better to define interference as any unwanted interaction between electronic systems - period! No fault. No blame. It's just a condition.

Personalities

You can't overestimate the importance of personal diplomacy when you're trying to solve a problem that involves two or more people! The way you react and behave when you first discuss the problem with other individuals, such as a neighbor, utility or cable company, or manufacturer, can set the tone for everything that follows. Everyone who is involved in an interference problem should remember that the best solutions are built on cooperation and trust. This is a view shared by electronic equipment manufacturers, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the American Radio Relay League (ARRL).

Responsibilities

No amount of wishful thinking (or demands for the "other guy" to solve the problem) will result in a cure for interference. Each individual has a unique perspective on the situation --and a different degree of understanding of the technical and personal issues involved. On the other hand, each person may have certain responsibilities toward the other and should be prepared to address those responsibilities fairly.

Any individual who operates a radio transmitter, either commercial or private, is responsible for the proper operation of the radio station. All radio transmitters or sources are regulated by the FCC. The station should be properly designed and installed. It should have a good ground and use a low-pass filter, if needed. If consumer electronics equipment at the station is not suffering the effects of interference, you can be almost certain that the problem does not involve the radio station or its operation. However, if the interference is caused by a problem at the station, the operator must eliminate the problem there.

Manufacturers of consumer electronics equipment are competing in a difficult marketplace. To stay competitive, most of them place a high priority on service and customer satisfaction. For example, many manufacturers have service information that can be sent to a qualified service dealer. Most manufacturers are willing to assist you in resolving interference problems that involve their products. Over recent years, manufacturers have built up a good track record designing equipment that functions well in most electrically noisy environments.

The FCC will do what it can to help consumers and radio operators resolve their interference problems. They expect everyone involved to cooperate fully. Experience has taught them that solutions imposed from the outside are not usually the best solutions to local problems. Instead, they provide regulatory supervision of radio operators and manufacturers. To help consumers, basic information concerning interference solutions is now available on the Internet through the FCC Consumer & Governmental Affairs Bureau Home Page. This basic information includes the CIB Interference Handbook and the FCC Consumer Facts Interference Bulletin. Specific information includesthe CGB Telephone Interference Bulletin,What Can I Do About Interference to My Radio page and the What Can I Do About Interference to My Television page. The CIB Interference Handbook includes a list of equipment manufacturers who provide specific assistance with interference problems. The list also is available through the Commission's Fax on Demand at (202) 418-2830. Callers should request document number 6904.

Finally, the consumer has responsibilities, too. You must cooperate with the manufacturer, the radio operator, and, if necessary, the FCC as they try to determine the cause of the problem. They need your help to find a solution.

What Causes Interference?

Interference occurs when undesired radio signals or electromagnetic "noise" sources are picked up by consumer electronics products -most often telephones, audio equipment, VCRs or TVs. It usually results in noise, unwanted voices or distorted TV pictures. In most cases, the source is nearby.

There are three common types of interference:

(1.) Noise: Interference can be caused by an electromagnetic noise source. Defective neon signs, bug zappers, thermostats, electrical appliances, switches or computer systems are just a few of the possible sources of this type of interference. Both you and your neighbors may be suffering from its effects. In some cases, the noise may be the result of a dangerous arc in electrical wiring or equipment and may provide warning of an unsafe condition that should be immediately located and corrected.

(2.) Overload: Even if a nearby radio signal is being transmitted on its assigned frequency, if it is strong your equipment may be unable to reject it. Your telephone, radio, stereo or TV should be able to separate the desired signal or sound from a large number of radio signals and electrical noises. This is shown in Figure 1.


Figure 1.



Consumer electronics equipment manufacturers have worked in cooperation with government regulators to set and meet voluntary standards of interference immunity. Modern equipment usually includes enough filtering and shielding to ensure proper performance under average conditions. Older equipment may not meet these standards, however, and even modern equipment can be affected if the interfering signal is particularly strong. In these cases, your equipment is working as designed, but it may need some additional filtering or shielding to function properly.

(3.) Spurious emissions: A nearby radio transmitter could be inadvertently transmitting weak signals on a frequency not assigned to that transmitter. These signals are called "spurious emissions." FCC regulations concerning spurious emissions are very clear. If interference is caused by spurious emissions, the operator of the transmitter must take whatever steps are necessary to reduce the spurious emissions as required by FCC regulations. Fortunately, modern transmitting equipment is manufactured to meet stringent regulations, and many radio operators are examined and licensed by the government. These federally licensed operators often have the technical skill to resolve interference problems that originate from their radio stations.

With all of these possibilities, it is difficult to guess which type of problem is causing your interference. Usually, only a technical investigation can pinpoint the cause and suggest a solution. This is where a spirit of cooperation and trust will pay off! If you believe your equipment is picking up signals from a nearby radio transmitter, the operator may be able to help you both find a solution to a mutual problem.

How to Find Help

Most consumers do not have the technical knowledge to resolve an interference problem. Even so, it's a comfort to know that help is available. Gather information about interference. The FCC and ARRL have self-help information packages or books. If the problem involves an electrical-power, telephone or cable-television system, contact the appropriate utility company. They usually have trained personnel who can help you and your neighbor pinpoint the cause of the problem.

Most consumer electronics manufacturers are willing to help you. Your owner's manual, or a label on your equipment, may give you information about interference immunity or tell you who to call about interference problems. If not, the Consumer Electronics Manufacturers Association will be able to give you the address of your equipment manufacturer's general customer service personnel. The manufacturers know their equipment better than anyone else and will usually be able to help you.

Operators of licensed amateur or commercial transmitters usually have some technical ability. These operators are the nearest source of help. Remember, the station operator may also be a neighbor! Use a polite approach to ensure that the relationship stays "neighborly." Licensed Amateur Radio operators have access to volunteers (Technical Coordinators and local interference committees) who are skilled at finding solutions for most interference problems.

Testing One, Two, Three . . .

If you think a neighbor's radio transmitter might be involved, you and your neighbor should arrange a test. It's important to determine whether the interference is (or is not) present when the radio station is "on the air." Your neighbor may want to ask another operator friend to participate in the test at your home. By the same token, you may want to invite a friend to attend the test at the radio operator's station. Having impartial witnesses will make you and your neighbor more comfortable with the outcome -whatever it may be. Be sure to choose your witness carefully. Select someone who is diplomatic and tactful.

The tests must be thorough. The transmitter operator must try all normally used frequencies, antenna directions and power levels. All results must be carefully written down. More than one set of tests may be needed. Once you and your neighbor have determined which frequencies and power levels cause the problem, you'll be one step closer to finding a solution.

Try the Easy Things First

Sometimes, the easiest solutions are the best. Many cases of interference can be resolved without the need for technical investigations or knowledge. As first steps, you might check your wiring for damage, for open outer wire shields, or for loose terminal connections. Try removing any added devices, such as video games, or even relocating the equipment or re-orienting the device's antenna and power cord.

If you suspect that the problem is caused by electrical noise, check for overloaded circuits, frayed wires, loose sockets, etc. These types of problems should be fixed no matter what! Have your electrician shut off one breaker at a time, noting if this has any effect on the interference. If so, determine which devices are connected to that particular line, then remove the suspect devices one at a time. When the interference goes away, you've found the "culprit." Your electric utility company service department will offer assistance if the interference is coming from defective equipment on the power lines or distribution equipment.

Interference filters for your consumer electronics equipment can be purchased locally or by mail order. These filters usually eliminate unwanted interference if they are used properly on the equipment that is in need of additional filtering.

According to the FCC's Interference Handbook, telephones and other audio devices that pick up radio signals are improperly acting as radio receivers. The interference can usually be cured, but the necessary filtering must be applied to the affected device.

Several companies sell modular telephone interference filters that are very effective. Your telephone company service department also may be able to help.

A high-pass filter may reduce interference to an antenna-connected television or VCR. A common-mode filter should be tried first on TVs or VCRs connected to a cable system. An AC-line interference filter may help with electrical or radio interference. These items can be purchased locally or by mail order.

Some interference cures must be applied to the internal circuitry of the affected equipment. This should always be done by authorized service personnel.

The ARRL has an information package called "RFI/EMI Radio Frequency Interference". They also sell a book, Radio Frequency Interference - How to Find It and Fix It, that provides additional guidance and technical information. Although it was written for Amateur Radio operators, the book may be helpful to you, too. Contact ARRL for information about their products and membership services.

Self-Help Cures

In some cases, when all else fails, you may need to resolve the problem yourself, or with the help of your electronic service person. It's impossible to use the remaining space to outline all of the possible cures for interference problems (the subject is quite complex). However, a few simple cures using commonly available parts can eliminate most problems. The self-help packages supplied by the ARRL and the FCC explain these cures in more detail.

Interference Can Be Cured!

Remember, most cases of interference can be cured! It takes cooperation between the consumer, the manufacturer and the radio operator. With a little bit of work, you and your neighbor can both enjoy your favorite activities in peace.

For More Information...

The ARRL and the FCC have self-help packages available to help you resolve interference problems.

 
RE: Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among N  
by K8AG on November 1, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
"The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or the one."

If this causes too much publicity, we may get a reaction from the FCC that we don't want.

Maybe they can use some of the lead painted toys from China as shielding for their electronics. ;)

73, JP, K8AG

 
Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among Neigh  
by K8YZK on November 1, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
The article, said that he was given a clean bill by the FCC before this current problem. Maybe it is not him, maybe it is a local 27mhz operator. Was he actually operating when the problems occured? A lot of unanswered question that the article never brought up.
 
RE: Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among N  
by KF6HCD on November 1, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
I would tend to think that since he has been operating for "over a decade," and his neighbors are citing interference problems for "two or three years," this fellow is not entirely to blame, if even at all. People buy crappy, leaky, insufficiently filtered consumer electronic items every day, then blame the first, nearest operator they see. Sad.

Given the fact that information is available for these people and that the operator has done his good faith best to ameliorate these issues, I say blame the crappy electronics that are being purchased by these narrow-minded, judgmental, poorly informed neighbors.
 
RE: Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among N  
by W3ML on November 1, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
"maybe it is a local 27mhz operator"

That was my problem. I was called and told that I was coming in over the FM radio of a lady over a block away. cber lives right behind her.
I was sitting at my dining table eating.

Neighbor next door said his computer speakers were picking up talking. All he could understand was something about airport.

I told him about the cber down the street that I had found out was using a big amp. Instructed him to put a filter or torrid cores on his speaker lines.

Haven't heard any more from him.

I look at it this way, if my TV is fine and nothing else is going wrong in my house I should not be doing anything to other people. I even have an old tv in the shack and get no interference in there.

73
John
 
Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among Neigh  
by KC2WI on November 1, 2007 Mail this to a friend!


-----Original Message-----
Sent: Friday, November 02, 2007 12:58 AM
To: nzimmer@dailysouthtown.com
Subject: RE: "Oak Lawn man's ham radio causes static among neighbors"


1. If the neighbors have had issues with household electronic devices "going back as long as two or three years," and the Amateur Radio operator has been "has been operating his radio on the block for roughly a decade," then there is a strong possibility that he is not the cause at all.

2. If the woman who can't use her phone at times "because the line is claimed by someone else's conversation" and the woman actually hears a conversation (both sides) then it is not the Amateur Radio operator because there's no way the woman would hear both sides of the conversation when half of it is being transmitted from hundreds or thousands of miles away.

3. The FCC has "done nothing to solve the problem" because most likely there is nothing they can or should do. The Amateur Radio operator is most likely legally operating equipment which meets certain requirements regarding spurious emissions, etc., and is approved by the FCC to operate in the Amateur Radio Service. He is licensed to operate the equipment.

The neighbors are "operating" devices which are supposed to meet certain standards with regard to shielding from radio frequency energy. However it is very common that such devices do not meet the standards. So the users of those devices have to check the certifications on those devices and if they are not meeting them, then contact the manufacturers and demand that they be repaired, or attempt to prove that the manufacturer falsely certified that they met the standards.

4. most import point: "Broadcasting" is not the Amateur Radio operator's hobby. In fact "Broadcasting" (defined as a one-way transmission) is expressly forbidden in the Amateur Radio service (with a few minor exceptions). He may be "operating" a few hours a day, but most of the time is spent receiving, and even during a conversation, he would only be transmitting at most 50% on average.
 
RE: Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among N  
by NN4RH on November 2, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
I'm often amazed at how much "interference" antennas cause some people - regardless of whether or not they're actually transmitting - and sometimes regardless of whether they're even connected.

 
RE: Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among N  
by N6HPX on November 2, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Had a friend tell me that before he got his license for CB years ago he bought the antenna but no radio..and he had a series of complaints on TVI. It was quite funny to him as he had to wait more than 6 months for the radio.
 
Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among Neigh  
by KF7CG on November 2, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Don't you know that antennas always cause interference.

Antennas capture signals. So there are several ways that they will cause interference. The can capture the signal that you want and then you can get it or enough of it to keep from having a case of the fuzzies. Second, they can captue a whole bunch of signals until they can hold any more and then let some leak out to get in the way of the signal you want. They don't even have to be connected to do this, just be up in the air to catch signals.

Now when they are connect, they can take signals from what they are connected to and let them out to interfere with just about anything.

Why don't satellite dishes and car radio antennas cause this problem? The satellite dishes are made to only capture signals from space so they can't get regular signal and cause problems. Car antennas do but they are just too small to be a real problem.

At least that is what I was told by a neighbor when I was putting up an antenna. That is what his satellite installer had told him and he was a "proffessional" so he should know.
 
Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among Neigh  
by KF7CG on November 2, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Don't you know that antennas always cause interference.

Antennas capture signals. So there are several ways that they will cause interference. The can capture the signal that you want and then you can get it or enough of it to keep from having a case of the fuzzies. Second, they can captue a whole bunch of signals until they can hold any more and then let some leak out to get in the way of the signal you want. They don't even have to be connected to do this, just be up in the air to catch signals.

Now when they are connect, they can take signals from what they are connected to and let them out to interfere with just about anything.

Why don't satellite dishes and car radio antennas cause this problem? The satellite dishes are made to only capture signals from space so they can't get regular signal and cause problems. Car antennas do but they are just too small to be a real problem.

At least that is what I was told by a neighbor when I was putting up an antenna. That is what his satellite installer had told him and he was a "proffessional" so he should know.
 
Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among Neigh  
by W2BSA on November 2, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
This sounds quite like the various junk that is sold as "quality consumer electronics". Also, the junk that is installed by cable tv installers is just that junk. Plus, the cable plant is usually incredibly leaky. I hear signals all of the time off of our cable system (Cox communications, Fairfax Co., VA) even though the main line is fiber, the connections to the home are copper.
 
Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among Neigh  
by KB1GPG on November 2, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Add me to the list of people causing problems with the neighbors. I put up my first HF antenna and within a few days heard second hand the neighbors complain I was messing up thier telephones. That was before I was able to connect the radio and even listen with it. Before that I thought stories like that were made up.
 
RE: Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among N  
by N6HPX on November 2, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
I am willing to bet that if you hook up an antenna on a home,without coax as what happen to my neighbor you will get alot of TVI.
I had a phone call once where the neighbor claimed I was creating TVI to her set and I hadnt been home all day. I been over 75 miles away in Pacifica and in that area I was using VHF to a repeater in San Francisco, and my home was another 30 miles away.
I did find out there was a CBer in the areaa who was running Power on his station as my own TV was showing lines, and it was on Cable...
 
Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among Neigh  
by WB4AEJ on November 2, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
My first cousin Scott (WB4FNN) was first licensed over thirty-five years ago.
In the early days of his ham career, he received a knock on the door one night. A female neighbor of his asked him if he was a ham radio operator. He replied that he was.
She promptly accused him of interfering with the operation of her refrigerator (give me a break).
A former coworker of mine got his license many years ago but he never purchased or otherwise obtained any amateur radio equipment. There wasn't even an antenna on his house. One night, he got a knock on the door. It was the FCC. They told him that a neighbor of his was complaining that his amateur radio station with interfering with their television (or was it radio receiver (I don't remember which)). They asked to see his station.
When he told them he had no equipment in the house, they were very embarrassed and apologized before immediately departing the premises.
Regards,
Fred, WB4AEJ
 
RE: Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among N  
by N6HPX on November 3, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
Mine down the hill from me said he had so many complaints that he was shocked. It was in the early days of CB when it took months for the license to come. He was a volunteer fireman and needed it to keep in touch with his wife and the Fire station. His ground plane wasd installed and no coax, or radio, on order from sears catalog.
I still cant believe my neighbor complaining about my giving TVI and wasnt even home..she said it was all day and I should have turned the radio off...I was over 75 miles away.
 
RE: Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among N  
by ONAIR on November 5, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
It's sometimes CBers who are the source of the problem. Heard one once coming over my microwave oven!
 
RE: Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among N  
by N6HPX on November 5, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
never had that problem yet as mine is always unplugged its 110 volt and we run 220 at home
 
RE: Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among N  
by KZ3X on November 6, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
I thought these kind of stories were made up by other hams for conversation, but apparently I was wrong. About 20 years ago, I moved from an apartment to my future in-laws house for a few months until our present house, which was under construction, was completed. I put up a 9 element 2 meter beam on the roof to work some SSB the one day and but did not hook the coax to my radio. The next day after I got home from work, my mother-in-law asked me if that antenna could be causing interference to a neighbors TV, 4 houses down the block. I said of course "no". The next day, my mother-in-law told me that the cable guy knocked on the door and wanted to investigate if the source of this "mystery" interference was emanating from the antenna that was connected to thin air. He came, he saw, shrugged his shoulders and mumbled, "you're right, it can't be that antenna". I never did find out where the source of her problem was.
 
RE: Oak Lawn Man's Ham Radio Causes Static Among N  
by N6HPX on November 7, 2007 Mail this to a friend!
For myself I did notice the guy once as his car went rolling through my mom's court where the rig was once hooked up and had a blast of radio on my TV set.

I was also amazed a CB'er who lived a block over from my home who I knew ran power kept trying to get me to meet him on his frequencies which were out of cb bands and I told him no way. When I asked why he wanted to converse about some TVI he had. I later found he was running a full KW linear and his neighbors were constantly on him about it. I informed him the linear would be better taken off the station as he could get some serious financial porblems from the FCC and he could even have it snagged by them. He didnt listen and had a visitor where they grabbed his gear and gave him a Ticket. He was back on in a week with another linear and this time they threw him behind bars for 2 weeks and a violation of 10,000 for operating the amp and ownership of a modified ham gear. Never saw him after that as I moved out of the area when I met my wife. I have a home overseas .
 
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