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[Articles Home]  [Add Article]  

Crimp On PL-259 Connectors

Michael S. Higgins (K6AER) on May 26, 2008
View comments about this article!


Many hams have varying degrees of success when attempting to install the revered PL-259 solder on connector. Often these attempts end with melted coax and connector and a poor connection that will fail over time. I have installed thousands of these connectors and I must admit that when things go right I consider myself lucky.

Recently a crop of crimp on connectors and crimp tools have become available that have made the process much easier. These connectors greatly ease connector assembly and the tools are readily available to the average ham. Pricing on the connectors is about the same as a Teflon PL-259 and the connection and finished product is far superior. Some previous crimp on connectors crimped a solder on PL-259 and those connectors were poor at best. That is not the case with the RF Industries connectors. These connectors were designed from the ground up to be a crimp on connector.

Prep tools are available to prep the coax to the specified length so all that needs to be done is slip the new connector over the RG-8, RG-213 or LMR-400 coax and then crimp the end piece (Center Conductor) and the ferrule over the outer shield. The end result is a coax and connector that is superior to any solder on product. I know there are the old timers who scoff at a crimp on connector but in the cell phone industry we have found that crimp on connectors have a much lower failure rate than any field solder on connector. In addition the pull strength is much higher because the coax crimp is a much stronger mechanical connection than soldering through four tiny holes found on the typical PL-259 connector body.

The end product looks like what you would expect from a commercial product. This is depicted in the photo below:




"N" Crimp Connector

PL-259 Crimp Connector

PL-259 Solder on Connector


In each case the crimp on product uses a ferrule that crimps to not only the outer conductor shield but also to the plastic jacket. -- This method makes a connection with superior pull and flex strength.

In tests I have found the pull strength of the "N" and PL-259 crimp on connectors to handle over 120 lbs of pull. I could not test to failure because I ran out of weights to put in the horse bucket attached to the connector via a female connector.

The next test was to sweep the lines via my HP network analyzer. Just to keep things constant all the connectors were attached to LMR-400. At 900 MHz the Crimp on PL-259 had .1 dB more loss than the crimp on "N" connector. Not bad. The solder on connector had .23 dB of loss at 900 MHz when compared to the crimp on "N" connector. The cable lengths in each case were 24 inches. I know the conventional wisdom is don't use PL-259's above 2 meters but I saw nothing on the analyzer that said this was true below 1 GHz. Now that doesn't preclude a bad connector design or poor female connectors on the radio unit but I saw no reason not to use the PL-259 crimp on at UHF.

The benchmark PL-259 solder in my connector assembly was a Teflon Amphenol unit. This is a $3.00 connector and comparable in cost with a crimp on connector.




"N" Crimp Connector

LMR-400 prepped for the crimp on "N"

LMR-400 prepped for the crimp PL-259

PL-259 Crimp Connector

Crimp tool cost is often what makes ham shy away from crimp on connectors. Some special crimp tools can cost well over $400. This is not the case with all crimp tools. RF Industries makes a very economical unit that I have been using for over 8 years and it is holding up well. The crimp tool come in a plastic case that has cut outs for die sets to crimp a variety of connector types from miniature coax up to LMR-400.


The RF industries crimpers with the .429 die set for LMR-400 size coax and the coax prep tool from Times Microwave.


A different prep tool is needed for the PL-259 connector due to the longer length needed for the center conductor. Although if you are handy with an exacto blade knife and have plenty of band-aids you may forgo the prep tool.

Typical time to assemble a connector is about one minute. This process is so simple that I stopped using solder on connectors for some time ago.

You can buy the tools from a number of distributors. Part numbers and pricing from Tessco distributors is shown below. The pricing shown is for small quantities.

Description Tessco # Price
Crimp on PL-259 - LMR-400, RG-8, RG-213 35985 $ 2.47
Crimp on "N" - LMR-400, RG-8, RG-213 14515 $ 3.35
Crimper set for large and small coax RG-8/RG-58 54250 $ 99.00
Prep tool for LMR-400, RG-8, RG-213 for "N" 59664 $ 71.00
Prep tool for LMR-400, RG-8, RG-213 for PL-259 68254 $ 101.00

Note the crimp on PL-259 from Tessco is an RF Industries Part Number RFU-507-ST and is available also from Talley, Hutton and Electro-Comm distributors. These distributors also sell the crimp and prep tools.

Typical quantity cable prices for LMR-400 equivalent coax can range from $214 for a 500 foot reel from JEFA Technology to $360 for a 500 foot reel of Time Mirror LMR-400 from Tessco.

Making your own cable assemblies can be a very cost effective alterative to buying pre built coax cables and jumpers. You can make up your own jumpers and feed assemblies in minutes. The cost of the tools is under $250 and you will make back your tool investment very quickly.

Member Comments:
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Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W7ETA on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Great prose.
Great article.

I had priced crimping tools and connectors, not for PL259s, a few years ago. I decide that since I have an array of soldering irons, and don't solder too often during a year, that I'd stick with what I have.

Guess I should admit that I like the smell of rosin, and enjoy the challenge of making a good solder joint.

However, it is a real PITA to try and solder at the top of a tower!

But. Its easy to see how valuable the crimp system could be for a club purchase.

73
Bob
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by N4CQR on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Nicely presented article. However expect to be grilled for even mentioning the use of a non-traditional amateur proceedure of preparing a PL-259 -type connector. ;)
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by RFEXPERT on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Well written article...

But......

I have dumped all my N and PL259 connectors and moved over to the 7-16DIN connectors. These are the best connectors available now.

I can install a compression 7-16 DIN connector in less time than it takes to install a crimp connector. You dont need any crimp tools, even prep tools are not mandatory.

Another reason for moving over to the 7-16 DIn connector is that there is buckets of surplus patch leads available using RG142,RG393 and Suhner RG214 silver plated coax going for very cheap prices. I see hams walking past them at hamfests thinking that the connector is an oddball connector. You can readily get 7-16DIN to N converters also.

If more people demanded 7-16 DIn connectors the prices will start falling. I picked up a box of 50 Andrew DIN connectors for Heliax on Ebay for 20 dollars. One thing is certain is that its just about impossible to make a DIN connector fail.

Amphenol makes DIN connectors for RG58 and RG213, all of very good quality.

Give the 7-16 DIN a try you wont be disappointed.
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by KG8JF on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I don't solder enough coax connectors in 10 years to make this product economically viable. I am sure it works fine and is a great product. The purists will bark, I fear.
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by K0BG on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
One point you didn't make... if you properly solder the center conductor (some are crimped and they don't count), the crimp on is virtually waterproof. As an added precaution, I use a small piece of double-wall, adhesive heatshrink, and the connections end up being much longer-lived than the standard soldered on PL259s. The only drawback with crimp ones is the up front cost.

Alan, KBG
www.k0bg.com
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W9UCR on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Nice article. How about an equivalent system for smaller diameter coax cable, e.g., RG-8X and RG-58U? Do you recommend anything?
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W4LGH on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
N4CQR said..."However expect to be grilled for even mentioning the use of a non-traditional amateur proceedure of preparing a PL-259 -type connector. ;)"

I am sure crimping techniques have improved over the years, but everytime I have had a coax problem, it had a crimped pl-259 on it. Besides, it not a difficult thing to install a pl-259 correctly and solder the connections. Especially if you own a Weller butane powered portable soldering iron.

73 de W4LGH - Alan
http://www.w4lgh.com


 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by N9XCR on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Great article! I just wish there were compression versions of these connectors available.

Chris
N9XCR
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by K3EY on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!

Another save a Penney article but you need to spend $250:) How many will actually spent $250 making up coax. I have been doing this for 26 years and not there yet.

Go out and spend 3G's on a radio and then try saving pennies using junky crimped coax connectors....hams are a howl and also extremely cheap and proud of.

I dont have time to use that crap. I used to solder my own until they started offering it ready made. Save money and get out of the hobby makes more sense---to me anyway.
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by N4CQR on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Although gaining acceptance, 7/16DIN for LMR-400(type)cable at 30-50USD for a single connector, depending on supplier, is cost prohibitive. To most of us anyway..

"Amphenol makes DIN connectors for RG58 and RG213, all of very good quality."
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by K9ZF on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Nice article.

It would appear the crimp connectors are at least equal to the solder on from your testing. Although I don't understand why a properly soldered connector would have show more loss than a crimped connector.

I'm afraid I will have to stick to soldering connectors, however. As a few have pointed out, the cost of the crimpers is way out of hand for my use. Over the past 20 years or so, I've probably averaged about 4 to 6 coax connectors per year. So it wouldn't be cost effective for me.

Doing PL-259's isn't really difficult. And I find N connectors easier still. I've used a pencil torch effectively, but usually use my old Weller D-550. Alan, K0BG, has a very good article on soldering PL-259's on his web site. Although he disagrees with my use of a soldering gun, hi hi. I've used it for years, and it's what I'm used to. I don't seem to have the trouble of melting the coax before the solder flows.


73
Dan
--
K9ZF /R no budget Rover ***QRP-l #1269
Check out the Rover Resource Page at: <http://www.qsl.net/n9rla>
List Administrator for: InHam+grid-loc+ham-books
Ask me how to join the Indiana Ham Mailing list!

 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by KI4WGI on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
When I worked 2-way radio maintenance, we used crimp on PL-259's on RG-58 coax for our mobile installations. They were easy to install & held up fine. We certainly installed enough to justify the cost here!

However, we still used solder-on PL-259's on RG-8 coax.

If you have an active club that makes this sort of purchase, it would make sense. However, most hams don't make enough patch cords, etc to justify the expense.

Note: when I was in the military, we had an awsome array of crimp tools available. The USAF prefers crimp over solder for reliability...especially in aircraft where vibration & other harsh conditions exist.

I also work as a manufacturing engineer in the "cable & connector" industry and again prefer crimping over soldering for several reasons. However, when producing a low volume part (100's are low volume!)I still resort to using soldering as my process. It is "good enough" for most purposes, makes good terminations when carefully done, and is reliable. It is a very flexible process that requires miminal equiptment.

At home I solder my connectors.

73's
Steve
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by N6YGG on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
The article was well written and informative. I, like many, find the cost prohibitive. At least for now!
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by G4AON on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
For some time I've been using compression fitting PL259 plugs on RG213 (same braid clamp idea as N plugs), they are far easier to fit than the four hole type. No need for expensive crimp tools with compression fitting plugs either. It looks to me like a win-win situation with them...

Dave
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by WA4DOU on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I first ran into crimp on connectors 31 years ago as a technician with the Arizona Highway Patrol. The crimp tools were obviously expensive as they "swaged" both the center conductor and shield ferrule. However, in every measure, they were first class and produced first class results. I still have a jumper with one of those connectors on one end and it still performs well.

I have employed connectors and the type of crimp tool suggested in this article with total success for the past 25 years, except generally I prefer the version
with solder on center pin. I have also employed solder on connectors extensively as well, over the course of decades and these are perfectly adaquate if done conscientiously. Solder-on is probably a more difficult skill to develop.

There have been "crimp-on" connectors in the marketplace that have been inferior and are unworthy of any consideration. Don't confuse them with the connectors in this article.

BTW, 7/16" DIN connectors are substantial and robust in their construction and capable of high power, high duty cycle modes of operation that tend to overheat the center pins of N connectors. I like to use them exclusively in the antenna cabling of 800 MHz trunked radio systems. They are totally unnecessary in lower frequency applications, especially below 450 MHz., at amateur power levels.
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by G4AON on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
For those wondering where to obtain clamp fitting PL259 plugs for RG213 cable, see:

http://uk.farnell.com/1169714/connectors/product.us0?sku=multicomp-plug-uhf-large-cable-entry-rg213

Dave
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by K5UJ on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I know all the arguments in favor of crimp on connectors but I always have this intuitive (and probably wrong) feeling that a better electrical connection is made with solder.

Anyway, I second the comment in favor of DINs--in addition they are waterproof and 50 ohm Z. What's going to have to happen for hams to give up UHF connectors is that manufacturers are going to have to start making products that have some other RF jack such as N on them. But no manufacturer is going to do that if the majority of hams have cables with UHF males. This catch-22 is what perpetuates the use of UHF connectors years after they were outmoded.
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by N0AH on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
trading junk for junk- don't buy into this-
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by NA0AA on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Amortized out over my current station, it would be about $5 per connector just for the tooling - still a bit pricy for my application. I got a cheap stripper for RG8 and I'm cool with a soldering gun. Apart from a major re-wiring of the station earlier this year, I need to install only a few PL connector a year - I'm not the customer for this item.

That being said, If I installed connectors for a living, I'd probably be the first to jump on this for sheer speed if nothing else.

BTW, want to minimize damage to cable when soldering on a PL? I wet a rag in denatured alcohol and after I finish the solder, I quench the connector body with the damp rag - it cools well, cleans off the flux residue at the same time.
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by KC6PGA on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I have never had any luck with the crimp style connector and question the reliability of those connections in situations where the coax is moving and subject to weather conditions. I have been putting connecters on using a single edge blade, propane torch, and scissors to trim the braid. The torch is the only way to go when trying to solder in the wind. Move fast with the torch and keep things cool with a wet rag. It takes some practice, but even if you trash a few connectors it's still better than having to buy a crimpier. Now if I could only put those rj-45s on
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by G0GQK on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Seems to me that there are probably more radio amateurs in the US quite willing to spend a large amount of cash to attach a piece of coax to a PL259 than would be the case in Britain.
The equipment needed for this little job would cost in Britain a 100. Just a little bit too expensive for parsimonious tight wads in the UK I'd say ! Its cheaper to to it properly the normal way.

G0GQK
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W1ITT on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I use UHF connectors only inside the shack, and only because most commercial gear is terminated that way. For all my switching and patching, I go to Type N, and ALL outdoor connections are Type N because they are reliably waterproof if assembled correctly.
The "pull test" is a nice idea as it establishes that the connector was assembled properly, but I never rely on the connector to hold up the weight of coax on the tower. Good practice calls for a strain relief and hanger.
Assembling coax connectors properly isn't particularly difficult for anyone who has any business holding an amateur license. I won't fault anyone who uses the crummy old UHF connector if he just learns to assemble it well, but there are better connectors, and their assembly procedures aren't particularly difficult.
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by WA4DOU on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
"Anyway, I second the comment in favor of DINs--in addition they are waterproof and 50 ohm Z. What's going to have to happen for hams to give up UHF connectors is that manufacturers are going to have to start making products that have some other RF jack such as N on them. But no manufacturer is going to do that if the majority of hams have cables with UHF males. This catch-22 is what perpetuates the use of UHF connectors years after they were outmoded."

A high quality UHF connector remains a perfectly good, useful and viable connector for any amateur application and many commercial ones up to at least 300 MHz and finds practical application for some uses to 470 MHz. The type N connector has little to no virtue below 300-400 MHz. There is no practical measure of a UHF connector that can be characterized
as outmoded.

Those that wish to regard any connector as weatherproof/waterproof may feel free to do so with my blessing. However, if I'm responsible for it and especially if I have to pay for it, it will be weatherproofed beyond just the seals that some invest their trust in. I've seen too many thousands of feet of heliax stripped off towers and replaced because connectors weren't properly weatherproofed.
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by N3EF on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I must disagree with your assertion that the crimped connector has a much higher "pull strength" than the standard soldered connector. The shield of a properly soldered pl-259 isn't just soldered "at the holes". The shield should be tinned and "adjusted" so that it is a tight fit inside the connector body that produces a 100% soldered shield when heated that may need only a small additional amount of solder added into the holes as required. This in addition to the soldered center conductor and the fact that the body is very tightly threaded about 1/2" onto the cable jacket makes it far superior in "pull strength" as compared with a crimped only connector. I also question your signal loss figures. Even at 900Mhz, I would expect to see about 1 to 2 watts loss with 100 watts input, not 5 to 6 watts (.23db). But I see nothing wrong with using crimp connectors. I use them as well as the soldered type. They are a good alternative for people that have trouble with the soldered types. Iv'e been a professional marine electronics technician for 33 years and have installed many hundreds of pl-259's and have seen hundreds installed by others. It is rare to find a soldered one done properly.

Eric N3EF
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by KY6R on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
LMR-400 is the absolute easiest to solder because the center conductor is solid and will slide easily into the center pin. I also think N type connectors are very easy to solder.

In the past, I have had trouble with the RG-213 and other RG-8 variants with the "stranded" center - until I bought my Dremmel tool ($70, and I can't tell you how much use I've gotten out of the tool!). Solder the center braided conductor and simply grind down the soldered wire until it fits the center pin of the PL/259. Alternatively - use a file.

I use a 40 watt soldering iron for this work with a fairly small tip, and just make sure I don't heat up too much. Its much better than a 25 watt iron.
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by K1CJS on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
One thing not yet mentioned is that the 'quality' of the crimp depends on the crimping tool. It stands to reason that a higher priced tool should produce a crimp connection that will be superior to connections made with low price crimpers and will even rival--and may surpass a good soldered on connector.

Also, the comment that the strain shouldn't be on the connector but on a strain relief anchor attached to the cable is bang on target.

It comes down--again--to common sense, or as the case may be, the lack of it.

 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by K4LVR on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I see LMR400 cable mentioned here, but there is one caveat... There is the "standard" LMR400 and the "flooded" LMR400.

The "flooded" type has a goop on the braid that is designed to keep water from impregnating the cable if you nick the jacket. It also keeps solder from sticking. So it is difficult, but not impossible, to attach a solder type connector to this cable. The center conductor works fine, just the braid has the goop. and its really sticky, too, makes a big time mess.

Naptha will clean the goop off the cable, but then it lets water get in at the connector junction if you dont seal it well.

I would recomend using crimp connectors exclusively with the "flooded" type. The "flooded" cable is labeled LMR400DB.
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by KL7HF on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Oh, the dreaded "Icky-Pic" impregnated cable.
Certainly is great for moisture resistance. The
negative is if you use it you must expect the
stuff in your ears, shorts, shoes and anything
else within shouting distance.
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by WB2WIK on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Great article, Mike. And nice to see you for dinner two weeks ago!

You told me you'd have this published here, and there it is.

I use crimps a lot, and have for many years. When I was in the microwave lab at HP 30 years ago, we used only crimp connectors for everything -- not because they worked better, but because they lasted longer and saved a lot of time. I think I had a tech assemble 100 type N patch cords in one day and they all swept perfectly to 6 GHz with time left over.

*No* variables exist if you have the right tools.

73

Steve WB2WIK/6
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by N0FPE on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Just made a new cable for my repeater using LMR400 and both a crimp N and a crimp PL259. I have the correct crimp tool for both. works perfectly. I dont solder a connector anymore unless I dont have my crimp tool with me. There is a reason most commercial 2 way folks use crimps nowdays. Sure makes life a bit easier!

Dan
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by NU0R on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I have installed hundreds of solder on PL-259's. I used to hate to attempt it due to the ensuing frustration at trying to get it done right. I have been soldering them for over 30 years now. A few years back I bought some bulk PL-259's at a very cheap price and used about 10 of them to just practice my soldering technique. I got quite good at it by the time I was finished. I gained enough experience soldering the PL-259's that it now is not such a big deal and I don't get frustrated much at all with it. I think Steve said one time that if it takes you much time to do the solder job then you are not doing it right. I agree. If done properly it is not difficult and goes quickly.--- I liked the article on the crimped connectors. I don't see any way that I can justify the initial up front expenditure, but I can see where this could be a real help to someone who just can't master soldering on of the connectors. It definately looks like it would be very beneficial as a club investment. Nice article!!!
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by KE5EXX on May 26, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
FANTASTIC ARTICLE!!! I've been using crimp connectors since 10Base2 Etheret. I'm sold on crimping the braid and jacket, and solder the center conductor. It works perfectly.

Recently I've been assembling transverters and amps for use rovers for VHF Contesting. If you figure we're rigging up to run on 5 to 8 bands from 2 radios, thats anywhere from 12 - 30 connectors for various cables ranging from SMA to BNC to UHF to N on either RG-58 A/U or LMR-400. Slide on Heat Shrink, prep the cable, crimp the connector, solder the center conductor, blow the Heat Shrink and you're good to go! I've just completed my 4th rover setup. I'm starting #5 tomorrow.

Thanks for a great article.

73's

de KE5EXX
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by ZS6AA on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Thanks for a most informative and interesting article Michael. I just did a quick diagram, and I think I have 30 PL259s (all soldered) in permanent use in my shack (excluding qrp/field setup and odd jumpers). I'm not sure of the quality of all the connections and have been meaning to do some cable maintenance before CQWW in November. Plus, my current expansion plans call for about another 10 coax cables (20 connectors) over the next year or two. So your article came at an opportune moment! I've emailed RFI to find out whether they have a distributor in South Africa.

73
Andrew
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by NV2A on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Well done article. Like many, I've spent a lifetime hating crimp-on connectors. But, I suppose in time there have been some improvements and maybe they warrant a second look. Don't know if I'd care to compare my soldered on connectors to the strength of the crimp on style !! Especially if we were just talking about half the antenna circuit or the shield only and not the easy to solder center pin. Thanks for a nice article.
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W6EM on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Good article. However, the best way to approach crimp ons is not to purchase dedicated crimp on tools, but instead a multi-die tool, like the Ideal Crimp Master.

Why? Because the most expensive part, the tool itself, is only purchased once.

You can find a used Ideal Crimp Master for about $40.

The dies cost anywhere from $10 or so, up. And, you can get them for many different connector styles and coax sizes from RG-174 coax on up.

The other useful feature is that you can also use the tool for solderless wire connectors for molex and amp multi way connectors as well, with the correct dies.

I've had my Crimpmaster for about 4 years and is probably my most used, most valuable tool in the shack.

Its used for coax connectors of all types, from mini UHF, BNC, up to PL-259s. And, on all my Stak-on or AMP/Molex connector pin installations. Even works well on the Anderson Power Pole lugs, using the uninsulated compression dies.

Again, good article, but not the most economic of choices for the compression job.

73.

Lee
W6EM

 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by K6AER on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
The RF Industry crimp tool is a multi die crimp tool. The tool kit comes with two sets of dies for RG-58 type cable and for RG-8 cable. Cost on the crimper kit is $99.00 which includes the case.

This covers:

RG-58, RG-59, RG-6, RG-142, RG-312, RG-400 small cable.

RG-8, RG-213, RG-214, LMR-400 all types.

Crimp dies are available for about $20 each and all types of cables and crimp on connectors.
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W6EM on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Actually, come to think of it, your "RF Industries" crimper looks like an Ideal Crimper knockoff.

If not the Crimpmaster, there's another multi-die tool that looks very similar.

The prep tools, while nice and neat, cost an arm and a leg. Way too much for most hams to justify, just to cut the polyethylene and braid away. A good knife and a ruler work well, if you're careful.

As to the dies, there are plenty of "knock-off" dies for virtually any type of compression connector. You can find them at electronics stores or on eBay.

Simply search for Ideal crimpmaster dies.

73.

Lee
W6EM
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by WR5E on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Could not find the listing in Tessco for the Prep tool for LMR-400, RG-8, RG-213 for PL-259, part number 68254. Tessco's part number for that comes up as a crimper. Is there another part number for the PL-259s cable prep tool that I am not seeing in the Tessco listing?
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by AE6FN on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
After corresponding with the author, I believe the the correct part number is 432414. Here is a link:

https://www.tessco.com/products/getProductInfo.do?sku=432414

Gregg
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by K0RGR on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Very good article, and I am sold.

However, I will skip the expensive prep tool. As long as I can figure out the proper dimensions, I think I can do as good a job with a good, sharp pipe cutter. You can buy the kind with very sharp, replaceable blades for around $10 at any hardware store, and they will give you nice, perfectly square, trimmed coax every time. I've seen the prep tools and they are very slick, however.
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W3LK on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Ok, someone clue me in ...

How do you purchase from Tessco if you aren't affiliated with a company. Even getting a list of re-sellers from them is a PITB.

As for finding dies on eBay (I already have the crimper and RG-58 dies) all I can find after an hour of searching there and Googling is RG-59, RG-6 and modular connector dies.

I'm pretty good a finding stuff, but not this time.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W6EM on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
"As for finding dies on eBay (I already have the crimper and RG-58 dies) all I can find after an hour of searching there and Googling is RG-59, RG-6 and modular connector dies."

Try "crimpmaster dies" or "crimper dies."

RF Industries appears to be a knock-off for the Ideal Crimpmaster.

There is also a generic line of dies that are carried by most electronics stores (besides RS) for reasonable prices. $13-$20 or so.
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W3LK on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
<< Try "crimpmaster dies" or "crimper dies." >>

With all due respect, what do you think I have been trying. :)

I found everything I need at RF Connection, my old stand-by for connectors.

Thanks,

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by KB2DHG on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Very nice well laid out article...
If I had to make up many of these cables up on a yearly basis, it might be worth the cost of the crimping tools needed...
Basicly I don't find it too difficult to do it the old fashioned way and solder the connector... Simply do a continunity test before soldering and then after. Also, remember to keep clean all solder points...
I have made many of these connectors up through the years and yes some I had to re-do some, but 21 years later they are still working fine.
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by N7TRZ on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Most PL-259 installations ruin the cable due to starting out with a much-too-small iron. Softens the cable keeping the heat on it too long.
I switched to N and BNC clamp-types long ago since they only required soldering the center pin.
More recently I switched to crimps since my dexterity and eyesight, as well as my patience, are sometimes lacking especially on small cables.
Properly sealed, the connection will outlast the antenna.
You do use non-contaminating jacketed cable, I assume?
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by KE4ZHN on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
The article is well presented. But, no crimp on crap for me. I can solder very well and dont mind putting on a PL259 the good old fashioned way. If I was in a hurry or didnt have a soldering iron I guess this would be ok in a pinch. I never had one of these crimp on jobs last as long as the soldered connectors do. Over time, as you bend the cable from connecting and disconnecting, the outer jacket of the coax always seems to pull out of the crimp. Perhaps these are better than crimp on's Ive seen in the past but whats so tough about soldering a connector in the first place? It may take longer, but they last for many years.
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by KF4JZY on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I enjoyed this article. I'm going to start using crimp-on connectors because I am getting tired of fussing with soldering them on. I have been looking at the crimpers High Sierra sells (http://cq73.com/index.php?_a=viewProd&productId=115). These look about the same as the others I have seen. Do you think these are a quality tool? The price is not all that bad.

Thanks,
Brent, KF4JZY
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W6EM on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
W3LK, "Lon" said:"<< Try "crimpmaster dies" or "crimper dies." >>

"With all due respect, what do you think I have been trying. :)"

Not much respect. Some folks use too many words and don't find what they're looking for..

Sorry I bothered.

 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W6EM on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
To those who still like to solder them, including me, at times, silver plated connectors make the job much simpler since it tins readily.

Also, using at least a 200W or 250W soldering gun or large iron is necessary to get the fast heat transfer to avoid melting and flowing the polyethylene.

Good luck, whatever way you do it. Don't forget to put some coax seal over the end of the ferrule, whether pressed or soldered. Moisture isn't your friend. Oxidation of the braid and ferrule underside on a compressed connector isn't too cool.

73.

Lee
W6EM
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W3LK on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
<< Not much respect. Some folks use too many words and don't find what they're looking for..

Sorry I bothered. >>

Don't get your shorts in a bunch, Lee. I guess you didn't see the smiley after my comment. Your problem, not mine.

Normally I find stuff when no one else does, but this time I was running into a brick wall, otherwise I would not have bothered posting to you, knowing your usual proclivity for being a grouch.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by N3EF on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Because of my profession, I have a couple of the high dollar Amphenol crimpers and dies but I also purchased a crimper kit that Mouser sells for only $79.00 The kit includes the crimper, 5 dies, a coax cable stripper for small coax (58, 59 etc.), cable cutters, a screwdriver for changing dies and a nice case to house it all. There is very little difference between it and the Amphenol one. It does the job just as well and Iv'e had no problems with it.
http://www.mouser.com/catalog/specsheets/EPD-200400.pdf

Eric N3EF
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W6EM on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Great find, Eric. Just what the Dr. ordered. And, inexpensive, considering what dies cost. It, too, looks identical to the Ideal Crimpmaster, but a much better price. In fact, a great price. And, you get a coax stripper to boot.

73.

Lee
W6EM/4

 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by KF4JZY on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Here's another kit for a decent price, and it comes with an RG-8 stripper.

http://www.hyperlinktech.com/item.aspx?id=878&cmp=ALSO

Brent, KF4JZY

Did anyone have a chance to look at those High Sierra crimpers I mentioned in my previous post to see if they look any good??
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by 5R8GQ on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
The author states:
"The cost of the tools is under $250 and you will make back your tool investment very quickly."

Well, that all depends on how many jumpers one makes in a period of time now, doesn't it? I know that the tools and dies would not pay for themselves in my shack for many years, if ever. There seems to be a debate about which crimpers and connectors are "junk" and which are good values.

I have had terrible luck the very few times I have had to use crimped jumpers, because they were the only ones available in an emergency and I didn't have the time (or tools) with me to make my own jumpers. The braid always seemed to work itself loose from the coax side of the connector. I would try to put some solder in the middle of the center connector. Sometimes it worked,, sometimes it didn't.

I too melted a lot of coax and burned fingers before I got the hang of instaliing PL-259's. I think it's a "Right Of Passage" for hams. Now I think it's fun, AND you KNOW that you are getting a good connection.

And offshoot of this discussion is that the number of hams who even KNOW how to install a PL-259 is decreasing, or so it seems. When I lived in Southern California in 2001-2003 time period I worked part time for a retail ham radio store. The numbers of hams who couldn't put on a PL-259 was amazing, I talked dozens through it. Most would buy a ridiculously overpriced
jumper just to avoid having to put on the connectors, even though we sold the connectors and the coax separately. The markup on pre-made coax jumpers is astonishing. The markup on HF rigs, especially popular ones, is very low, usually $25 to $50 or less. We made more profit selling a pre-assembled 100 foot 9913 Jumber than on an IC-706 MkIIG.
I also remember hams buying Larsen mobile antennas, then coming back into the shop angry because those antennas are terminated without a connector, so that the installer can put the coax through a firewall of an auto and/or cut it to the ideal length for the installation.

Maybe installing a PL-259 should be part of the Ham Radio Exam!
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by N3EF on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
There's another PL-259 connector out there that many have never heard of. It's used for RG8x and RG58 and requires no cable preparation other than to have the end of the cable cut off squarely. It's made by Shakespeare and called "centerpin technology" connectors. A little pricey but they are gold plated and geared toward the marine world. Iv'e used several of them and they work just fine. They install in less than 30 seconds and work great in situations where you simply cannot solder, need a job done in a hurry...etc.

http://www.centerpin.com/centerProductCOAX.cfm
http://store.hamiltonmarine.com/browse.cfm/4,12060.htm

Eric N3EF
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by AE1X on May 27, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I can add one thing. I worked a M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory and we did significant tests to determine whether the crimp terminals were as good as solder connectors. The results indicated that properly fabricated crimp connectors are every bit as good as soldered connectors.

Ken - AE1X
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W4LGH on May 28, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
N3EF said..."There's another PL-259 connector out there that many have never heard of. It's used for RG8x and RG58 and requires no cable preparation other than to have the end of the cable cut off squarely. It's made by Shakespeare and called "centerpin technology" connectors."

At $8.00 a pop, kinda brings a new meaning to.. ~sticking pins in your coax~

I'll just stick with the good ole fashioned PL-259, and me trusty soldering iron.

I do like the idea of it being on the Exam, along with a few other basics, like design a grounding system for your shack.

73 de W4LGH - Alan
http://www.w4lgh.com
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by K4RAF on May 28, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Having learned how not to make a connector at age 10, I have acquired the patient skills for most any connector. It takes standing still. Never do a connector in a rush... leads to failures & lots of !@#$%! use.

I have found a specific toolset, including 2 sets of cutters (1 being a smaller, finer 'trimmer' for braid), crimpers & connectors can be kept ready in a hip pouch. All I did to update my pouch was add a CAT5 set & I can do most anything technology presents me. For 7/16" DIN to 1-5/8" hardline, tools can be kept in a small backpack along with proper weatherproofing materials.

As an RF Engineer, these skills prove more rewarding than the proper quality tools!

K4RAF


 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by WA2JJH on May 28, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Personal shack use.....I will use a 100W+ weller solder gun.

However, when I worked in TV or production studios, crimp on types were used for speed, quantity, or custom exact lengths.

I use the Kings crimper. I have he dies for most video cables that use BNC's
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by K6ELQ on May 28, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Good timing! I have just begun my transition to UHF crimp-on connectors. I have been doing type-N and SMA crimp-on connectors for years. For the UHF connectors I have stocked up on RFU-507-SI (for 9913 & LMR-400) and RFU-507-ST (for RG-8/U & RG-213/U) connectors from RF Parts (http://www.rfparts.com/c-uhf.html). They also have a crimp tool die set, the RFA-4005-20 and RFA-4005-02, that is about $70. My latest cable of choice is LMR-400UF. I have found that none of my fancy coax strippers work with this coax and have resorted to the old reliable blade for this cable.
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by WA5ZUP on May 28, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
RFU-507-SI connectors also work for 9913F7 and Davis RF Bury-Flex coax
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by WX1F on May 28, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Removing the slick shiny coating of a PL-259 coax connector and it's adapters by using a jewelers file or sand-paper, pre-tinning it and then cleaning off the rosin with alcohol...then soldering your connector takes practice. It also beats the crap out of a crimped connector and lasts forever. Maybe you're in a hurry. Maybe you're lazy. But I can guarantee you will regret using a crimped-on connector if your coax connection pops loose from your tri-bander after spinning it 180 degrees and you've just cranked out a legal limit 15 second CQ.
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by K6YE on May 28, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Mike,

You have penned a great and useful article. Much gras.

Semper Fi,

Tommy - K6YE
DX IS
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by KL7DWE on May 28, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
A piece of black heat shrink makes a very water tight connection, assuming you slip it on the coax before you start cutting.
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by WA2JJH on May 29, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I second that. Good artical! Good feedback too.
Not one size fits all.

CATV setups are all crimp on past the "head end".
I could see for rotot apps, crimp cables could be a big problem.

If one has to make 50+ video cables, crimp on is king.

For RF, I go with the old 150W weller for PL-259.

The very WORST are the solderless screw on PL-259's at radio shack. No crimping at all. RF shorts are very common.
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by K8AI on May 29, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
RFEXPERT:

Wow, don't you think 7/16 DIN connectors are a bit overkill for ham use?

Crimp connectors are the industry standard for small flexible cable assemblies. I don't know why anyone would prefer one of those old solder-on PL-259's to a crimp type other than the fact that they're cheap (the main reason they would appeal to most hams, I suppose).
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by KJ5XX on May 29, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Excellent, well written article, however, if I have to spend $250 to do something that normally costs me <$3.00, and at that only on rare occasions, I find it very hard to cost justify.

If/when better and more cost-effective methods come along, then perhaps, but until then I'll be soldering my connectors.

73,

Ron - KJ5XX
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by AD5KL on May 29, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Just bought a couple of RG-213 patch cables with crimped connectors from Texas Towers & got sticker shock at the register. I could almost buy a tank of gas for my SUV for the cost of 2 cables, 6 foot & 1 foot. Yes they were that expensive. Instead of paying freight online from someone else, I just bit the bullet & paid the local store.

So maybe the cost of the crimper isn't too out of line, if you have more than a few cables to make.
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by K7ZP on May 29, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Great article Mike.....

It is very interesting how many folks out there are not fond of the crimp-on style connectors that both of us have used for years. The "real" Amphenol Corp. has produced these crimp on style connectors for many years.... at least 30 that I have been using them. I think perhaps many of the skeptics out there are that way due to poorly prepared and crimped connectors. I have never made a crimp on that failed. I do however use the Daniels (DMC) HX4 crimp tool with an assortment of crimp dies. Both Mike and and I are in the RF business and can absorb the cost to some extent. Today the Amphenol/Connex Corp. is a major supplier of connectors for all types and transmission lines. I also use N type at 10 GHz running 200Watts CW. Check your current cable for it's power rating at that freq and you will see just how capable these units are.

Thanx for reading my rambling...Frank, K7ZP
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by KC5CQD on May 29, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
"Another save a Penney article but you need to spend $250:) How many will actually spent $250 making up coax. I have been doing this for 26 years and not there yet.

Go out and spend 3G's on a radio and then try saving pennies using junky crimped coax connectors....hams are a howl and also extremely cheap and proud of.

I dont have time to use that crap. I used to solder my own until they started offering it ready made. Save money and get out of the hobby makes more sense---to me anyway."



Well I suppose that this is where my trade pays off. Being an electrical contractor, I purchased multiple sets of crimpers many years ago and they have paid for themselves many times over. Oh yeah; and they work great for crimping PL-259 connectors also. Been doin' it for many years, in fact.

Great article and very informative. If you're like me....always experimenting with a new antenna....the crimpers are well worth the price.


 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by WA4DOU on May 29, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
"A piece of black heat shrink makes a very water tight connection, assuming you slip it on the coax before you start cutting."

Perhaps in your reality but not in mine.
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by NO6L on May 29, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Let's see, $3.00 for the crimp-on connector and $40.00 for the tool vs $1.70 for a top quality silver plated PL-259. We already have soldering irons for other tasks, but the crimp tool is only usable for crimping. Another plus is with the PL-259 I can re-use it in a pinch.

Now, if you don't know how to properly prep and attach PL-259s, repeatedly, with zero shorts or opens, I'm sorry, you need to learn to do it right. It's not that difficult. An exception would be somebody who is sight impaired, in their case a crimp style connector won't help. Also, if you've got problems with the jacket being extracted from the body of the PL-259 you are probably not supporting it correctly at the antenna, for example, or are otherwise abusing it. There it is, someone had to say it.

What the author failed to mention is that in the cell phone and business communications industry, "Time is money". So, if the technician can crimp on 10 or so $3 connectors in the time it takes to perform a single $1.70 PL-259 attachment, they're getting more for the per hour salary the tech is getting paid. They also have an "infinite" supply of money for the higher cost connectors and tools. I'm not getting paid to do this and I don't have that kind of cash available.

There you go, some legitimate reasons for not using crimp style connectors of sufficient quality that aren't based on "tradition" and "here-say".

de NO6L

 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W6EM on May 30, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
NO6L has probably the strongest argument thus far to justify crimp connectors. Labor cost. Production-line-style assemblies, where labor cost and consistency is a factor. Not the case in hamdom.

As to jacket creep, yep, that is a problem with both PE and PVC. Its called shrinkback and occurs over time. And is aggravated by vertical orientation as he says. Bending radii also shouldn't be less than about 12X OD or about 6 inches either.

The other likely cause of pull out of the jacket is cutting the jacket off too close to the end of the ferrule. It should be left on so it slides well inside the ferrule or adapter, for at least about 1/2 inch or so. In the case of the adapters for 58/59, all the way to the bottom end, about 3/4 of an inch.

I solder my PL259s, but crimp everything else for 58, 59, 174 and 8X. Why? Fast, easy, excellent connections for those. Try soldering on an RG-174 BNC or SMA or mini-UHF (you can't) and see what I mean.

If you want a real connector exercise, do a few Andrew heliax connectors. But, don't forget your tape measure. Very important.

My crimpers get the most use from solderless compression connections, AMP Mate-n-Locks, and power pole tabs.

 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W8WY on June 1, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Good information Mike. I would rather crimp than solder any day. I am really writing this to thank you for your continual amateur radio contributions. Your help on the air, to many of us less informed, about grounding concerns, audio problems, and everyday equipment evaluations is much appreciated.

Thanks Mike & 73's
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by KT6KT on June 3, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Great article for certain applications.
Soldered connectors are reusable. Crimped-on are not. Some of us frugal hams recycle connectors.
For anything above 30 MHz, I NEVER use PL-259s.
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by G3LBS on June 4, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
WA@JJH said 'The very WORST are the solderless screw on PL-259's at radio shack. No crimping at all. RF shorts are very common'
I've had no trouble with these running low and high power. They are really quick to assemble.
I've had trouble with soldered ones when the coax was bent near the plug.
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W7NWH on June 4, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I use crimp on BNC's for broadcast SD and HD TV. Works fine I guess. Just doesn't seem right for UHF connectors though. I was making jumpers and coax cables for the hobby since I was 10. Not that hard, worst part is getting solder into the holes and hitting the braid without melting the dialectric. Now I can make a UHF connector the correct soldered way in about 3 minutes. And I do know a soldered connection is superior to a crimp connection electrically.

I have purchased crimped on UHF's only to replace them with a "real" Amphenol made-in-the-USA connectors.

I've never had a short or a failure in 30 years. And this living in a wet climate.

My 2 Cents.
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by K2TFS on June 9, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Really nice article! Over the last thirty years or so I have employed both solder and crimp methods on an untold number of PL259's. I feel alot more confident of the durability of a soldered termination for outdoor use, but can't see why a crimped termination wouldn't be sufficient for an indoor, mechanically unstressed application. I have the equipment for both procedures. Unfortunately, I haven't found a readily available source of inexpensive crimp type connectors. I got ripped off on eBay (oh my what a surprise!!!) a few years back and I've stuck to the soldering gun ever since. Nevertheless, if anybody has a reliable source of crimp type connectors, I'd much appreciate hearing about it.

k2tfs_snj at arrl dot net
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by WA7PRC on June 12, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
K2TFS requested:
[snip] ...if anybody has a reliable source of crimp type connectors, I'd much appreciate hearing about it.

Amphenol makes the 83-58FCP "Field Crimp Plug" (for RG58/U only). I've used 'em since the 80s, installed them in zillions of mobile (mostly CB) applications and my own applications as well. They require NO special tools to install -- I can install them using only a pair of diagonal cutters w/ a sharp point.

Once upon a time just for grins, I decided to see how well they held onto the cable. I hooked the connector in the jaws of my bench vise and pulled until something let go. The connector didn't let go -- the cable broke.

They're available from Mouser for $2.77 ea in 1 to 9 lots -- not much more expensive than a 83-1SP + UG-175.

Bryan WA7PRC
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by K5MO on June 15, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
My solution.
200 Watt American Beauty soldering iron found at garage sale. Cost $1.

As has been said over and over, the secret to soldering these connectors is a lot of hot thermal mass. I could beat someone to death with this iron, it weighs so much, but as such, it's perfect for this application.

I've got a crimper too, but the iron is the best solution for me.

Secret 2. After quickly soldering the connector with your mongo iron (takes about 20 seconds) quench the connector shell in a wet sponge, to prevent damage to the dielectric.

That's all you really need to know!

John K5MO
 
RE: Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by W3LK on June 15, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
<< Unfortunately, I haven't found a readily available source of inexpensive crimp type connectors.>>

www.therfc.com (The RF Connection) has silver/teflon for $2.00.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
 
Crimp On PL-259 Connectors  
by N1YRK on June 16, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
The cost of the crimping tool is the problem, because most people don't make too many cables. I picked up a Daniels crimper off of ebay pretty cheap,but then I have to find the dies for each cable, what a piTA.

A good quality crimper and dies would be a good club investment. And a session in how to use the tool would be a good meeting topic.
 
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