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[Articles Home]  [Add Article]  

A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting

from Randy Thompson, K5ZD on November 18, 2008
View comments about this article!

"Editor's Note: Due to the popularity of some of eHam's older articles, many of which you may not have read, the eHam.net team has decided to rerun some of the best articles that we have received since eHam's inception. These articles will be reprinted to add to the quality of eHam's content and in a show of appreciation to the authors of these articles."





A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting

Why am I here? Listen to all these signals. Who are they? Wonder what they are doing? All this CW sure sounds nice. What should I do with this keyer paddle? Should I push this button? I can turn this big knob but what does it mean? Why am I here? There must be some reason, if only I could remember.

It is the 1981 CQ WW CW Contest and my first real attempt at single op DX contesting from the station of N5AU. Sunrise on Sunday morning is only minutes away. I remember waking up, sitting in front of the radio, and experiencing a disorienting state of confusion and wonder. Later, I learn from N5AU's mother that I sat there for over 15 minutes without moving. Finally, slowly, I was able to understand what I was doing and why. The "sleep drunkenness" abated and I returned to the rhythm of the contest.

There have been lots of articles that describe contest strategy and station design, but there is little about the mental and physiological aspects of the sport. Yet we have all known of, or experienced, contest efforts that were cut short by an operator who could not wake up on Sunday morning. This article will present a strategy I use to get through DX contests with the minimum amount of sleep (and maximum score).

I have no medical experience or training. The ideas presented here are based on techniques learned in conversations with many successful contesters including N6TJ, N6AA, K5MM and others. I was also greatly influenced by an article which appeared in the November, 1988 issue of NCJ(1) by Scott Johnson, KC1JI. Johnson was a Physician and sleep researcher at Harvard Medical School. As NCJ editor at the time, I was fortunate to have had the opportunity to talk with him and gain some additional understanding of sleep and its effects.

There is no magical or perfect technique for controlling the effects of sleep deprivation during a contest. Probably the most important aid is simply the knowledge of what sleep deprivation feels like. The more you understand the effects and how they influence your own mental and physical attitude, the better equipped you are to compensate for them.

Sleep Basics

There are a few basic aspects of sleep that are useful to know. Researchers have found that sleep is structured into approximately 90-minute cycles. A typical night's sleep typically has 4 to 6 cycles. Each cycle begins with light sleep, progresses into deep (or delta) sleep, and ends with dream or rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The first sleep cycle has a predominance of delta sleep with a short period of REM sleep tacked on to the end. With each cycle, delta sleep diminishes and REM sleep occupies more of the 90-minute cycle. By the fifth cycle, sleep is almost totally REM.

Since REM sleep is associated with being closest to wakefulness, it seems logical that it will be easiest to wake up during this time. Since the first sleep cycle ends with a short period of REM, you want to try to time your contest naps to match the 90-minute cycle.

The body temperature falls during sleep and typically reaches its lowest point approximately 1.5 hours before the usual waking time in the morning. This minimum in body temperature coincides with the time of minimal alertness, if you happen to be awake. Lower body temperature is the reason that waking up just before sunrise during a contest often includes a period of chills and uncontrollable shivering. As you become more awake, your body warms up, and the feeling of cold goes away.

Recently, I read a military training manual that presented some information on sleep and its effects. It presented several interesting "facts."

* You can not train for lack of sleep. In other words, there is no value in "practicing" sleep deprivation as a way to train the body to live without sleep.

* Under sleep deprivation, highly practiced skills will deteriorate more slowly than those which require new or creative thought. This explains why we can continue to do CW, copy call signs and send exchanges at the end of a contest, but may be unable to answer a simple question from our spouse.

Before the Contest

Contesting is hard work that places both physical and mental stress on the body. You can practice the mental skills of contesting by operating in lots of contests. As for the physical aspect, I divide my preparation into two parts: fitness and sleep.

Do your family or co-workers laugh when you tell them contesting is a physically demanding activity? It takes a lot of energy to sit up straight, talk or send CW, concentrate on listening, type on the keyboard, and reach all of the switches and knobs found in your station. Dick Norton, N6AA, uses a very good example which may make it easier to understand. A 48-hour contest is the equivalent of six 8-hour workdays. Imagine sitting at your desk at work for just one work day with little or no breaks and then multiply by six!

At one point in my career, I had a sales job that involved driving about 4000 miles each month. I noticed that the longer I did this job, the easier it was to sit up straight through a contest. My body developed the muscles required for sitting up during the hours and hours of driving.

Several years ago I got a bicycle and began by just riding to the end of the street and back. Each day I would go a little farther until finally I was up to 5, then 10, then 15 miles each day. It was fun. When Fall came and there was not enough light to go for long rides after work, I tried running. The aerobic workout of the bike made running easy. Once again, I started just going down the street and back, then increasing the distance each week.

When the contests came, I noticed an incredible benefit of the exercise. It was as though the physical demands of the contest had disappeared! I was able to stay awake more easily and my muscles were not as tired during the contest. Without the physical drag, I was able to focus all of my energy to battling the mental fatigue. One result was a 48-hour effort (no sleep) from K3TUP for a win and new USA record in the CQ WW CW. In retrospect, any 3 hours of sleep would have cost me the record and possibly the contest. Another benefit of the exercise was 25 pounds of lost weight!

When my travel schedule made it impossible to maintain this exercise regimen, the weight came back and I noticed how much more difficult it was to get through the contests. You spend hours developing your station and operating skills. Can you ignore physical fitness as a component of a winning contest effort? For best results, you should begin your physical preparations a minimum of 12 weeks prior to the contest.

The sleep preparation for a contest begins five to seven days before the contest. The goal is to be as well rested as possible going into the event. I try to get as much sleep as I can each night during the week. While sleep can not be "stored," the benefits of starting well rested are obvious.

The night before the contest I go to sleep as early as possible. I have learned that excitement, anticipation and nervousness will have me awake at dawn. Some people even take a sleeping pill Thursday evening to insure a sold night's sleep. Not knowing if there are residual effects of these pills, I have avoided this.

One questionable technique many people try is to stay up late on Thursday evening in the hope of sleeping late on Friday morning. This sounds like a good plan but there are several things at work against it. The body's natural rhythms, referred to as circadian rhythms, modulate the physiologic functions such as sleep, hunger, etc. If you normally wake up at 7 AM, there is a good chance that you will wake up at 7 AM the morning of the contest. If you stayed up late, you are just reducing the amount of sleep you are likely to get. Nerves and anticipation will increase the chance of waking early and not being able to fall back asleep.

I usually go to work on Friday morning. This keeps the mind busy (and off the contest). I try to get to the station in the early afternoon. I turn everything on, make sure it's all working, and then head off to bed for a nap. A 1.5 or 3 hour nap prior to the contest is crucial in making it through the first 24 hours without sleep. You may find it difficult to sleep with the contest only hours away, but it has to be attempted. I often practice relaxation techniques to help fall asleep. If I wake up early, I repeat the process. I want to wake up about an hour before the contest starts.

The last bit of preparation before the contest is a meal. I try to keep it light and not drink too much liquid. The goal is to have enough fuel to make it through European sunrise (0900z) without having to get out of the chair.

The First 24 Hours

For me, the first 2 or 3 hours of the contest are some of the most difficult. The nerves are on edge, adrenaline is flowing, and the body must adjust to the demands of operating. It is even harder when no one answers your CQ and all that energy must be channeled into a search & pounce effort!

I have two simple goals for the first 24 hours of the contest: operate as much as possible and maximize the score. For most contests, I am out of the chair no more than three times for a total of less than 15 minutes in the first 24 hours. I do not even consider sleeping. By pushing so hard the first night and covering all the bands, I usually have a good multiplier and understanding of the available propagation. This will be important when planning the sleep strategy during the second night.

If you do need to sleep the first night, the best time (from the Eastern USA) seems to be the hours between European sunrise and local sunrise. The 09 - 11Z hours are often very low rate multiplier chasing. You can sleep for 90 minutes at a cost of approximately 30 contacts and 10 multipliers.

If you can arrange your shack so that you can see the sun rise through a window, this can be a great lift. There is something about seeing the sun come up that energizes the body and improves alertness (remember those circadian rhythms). It also keeps you in tune with when you should make the last low band sweep for multipliers before moving to the higher bands.

I also use the full 24 hour first day effort as a form of motivation. We began noticing at the K5RC multi-single efforts that we could predict our final score based on the 24 hour score. My formula is to double my 24 hour score and add 10 percent. For example, if I have 1.8 Million points after 24 hours, I estimate my final score to be 3.6 plus 10%, which is just under 4.0 Million. My focus for the remainder of the contest is to make that formula come true!

Much of contesting is a series of mental games. Each one designed to give a short term target that maintains focus on increasing the score. Trying to maximize my 24 hour score provides a big boost for me during late Saturday afternoon when the first signs of tiredness begin.

The Second 24 Hours

I am convinced almost anyone can get through 24 hours of contesting just on their love of the game. But the second day requires a solid commitment, desire, and preparation. The fact that contesting is a solitary pursuit both helps and hinders the participants. It helps because the scores of other participants are not known, which makes it easy to justify continuing. The enemy is fatigue which will cause doubts and questions on whether it is even worth continuing! Or, as Vince Lombardi once said, "Fatigue makes cowards of us all."

The top competitors have committed themselves to the contest. They know they must go on no matter what. It's not easy, but this little fact will help them ride through all but the worst problems. Everyone feels the same pain and effects of sleep deprivation. It's really a question of how bad you want to win.

I notice that my committment to a contest often starts many weeks before the contest. As the contest approaches, I become more focused and more committed to doing a full effort. The build up and motivation gained over the weeks makes it almost impossible to give up or stop.

Maybe it is just a mental let down, but it always seems as if the propagation and activity take a dive immediately after 0000z. Rates are slow because many Europeans have gone to bed and the South Americans have all been worked before. By 01 or 02z, it is becoming a battle to stay awake.

Stu Santleman, KC1F, recommends that this is an excellent time to catch some sleep. "Sleep when the Europeans sleep," he suggests. I disagree with this since it is also the last opportunity to catch many Europeans on 160 and 80 meters. However, I do feel it is a good chance to take some time to recharge your batteries. I usually take 30 to 45 minutes during the 01 or 02z hours to take a shower and eat dinner. The shower wakes me up enough to get through the crucial hours of European sunrise. I eat sitting at the radio tuning for multipliers.

After European sunrise, about 0900z, the contest really slows down. Attention is split between random CQing and tuning for new multipliers. Here is where commitment will be really tested!

I base my sleep strategy on the activity and propagation that was available during the first night. I know what multipliers I am missing on the low bands and can decide if sleep is more important than taking the chance of finding them.

Once the decision to sleep is made, it is important to get right to bed. Don't waste time trying to think about the contest. When you lay down, clear the mind and fall asleep as quickly as possible. Set the alarm for either 90 or 180 minutes later to take advantage of the natural sleep cycle. If you try to wake up from deep sleep, a form of disorientation I call sleep drunkenness may result. Worse than the hallucinations and disorientation is the real possibility that you will go back to sleep without ever waking completely up. This has happened to me twice. One time I even had a conversation with a local multi-op on two meters (so they said, I can't remember it at all) and woke up four hours later in another room of the house. This fear of not waking up is usually the real reason I try to stay awake and keep going!

When you wake up, you will probably feel very cold. Be prepared for this by having something warm to drink available and a sweatshirt or sweater you can pull on. Take a few minutes to get fully awake and eat something. Once you sit down at the rig, you must plan to be there until the end of the contest (with only short breaks). As soon as the sun comes up or you pass your normal wake up time, it is easy to stay awake. The battle is in the minutes or hours before dawn.

The last 12 to 13 hours of the contest coincides with my normal rhythm for being awake. The only difficulty is fighting the effects of sleep deprivation. These are not usually obvious at the time. However, there is an easy way to see just what the loss in mental sharpness is. During the next DX contest, tape record a run during the first morning. Then tape record a similar time the second morning. After the contest, play the two tapes back to back. You won't believe how much your call sign recognition and ability to get calls on the first try is degraded! Unfortunately, there is not much you can do except recognize the problem and work through it.

More Tips

There are a number of other techniques that you may wish to use as part of your sleep strategy. One suggested by W2SC is to try taking very short 10 minute naps when you feel sleepy. This appears to offer some rest yet does not allow you to fall so far asleep that you can not wake up easily.

Notice that I did not mention the use of caffeine in my strategy. I am not a coffee drinker so I can't speculate on its effects. As I get older I am finding it much more difficult to fight through the need for sleep. As a result, I have occasionally taken a caffeine pill (such as No-Doze) to help stay awake. I take 100 mg of caffeine at the lowest point of each night. Caffeine can upset your stomach so it is a good idea to eat something at the same time.

I have had some success with combining caffeine with the short nap technique. I take the caffeine and then sleep for 10 minutes. The effect of the caffeine and the nap seem to compliment each other as a way of getting some rest and yet waking up with a clear head.

I think it goes without saying that drugs and alcohol should not be used during the contest. Alcohol is a depressant and will cause you to fall asleep (not to mention interfering with the mental energy you need to win).

One area of contest physiology that I have not studied is the effects of diet. I find that I eat and drink very little during the course of the contest. Working stations is like potato chips for me -- I can't stop! Several times during the contest I will suddenly realize I am starving, and yet I keep wanting to work just one more station before taking a break. And one more. And another!

Not drinking very much has the benefit of reducing the number of trips to the bathroom. However, this must be balanced against the danger of dehydration. I have lost as much as 5 pounds during the course of one contest! If you have discovered a successful contest diet, share it with me!

After the Contest

One thing I have always been amazed by is the adrenaline generated by the excitement of the end of the contest. The pressure of the last two hours is trying to push the score on the computer screen over the next milestone. Should I call CQ or tune? Or a combination of both. When it's over, I am tired and almost incoherent (just listen to the single ops on 3830 for proof). Afterwards, I can't fall asleep for several hours. If only we could bottle that feeling!

Expect any contest effort of more than 44 hours to require several days of recovery. I usually sleep for 12 to 15 hours after the contest. And I still feel sleepy until about Wednesday!

I hope the ideas presented here are of help to you in your next serious DX contest effort. As long as DX contests are 48 hours, the serious single operator entrants must deal with the effects of sleep deprivation. Good preparation, serious commitment, and a well-tuned sleep strategy may be just the edge you need to beat your competition.

(1) "Sleep - A Contest Prescription," T. Scott Johnson, KC1JI, National Contest Journal, November/December 1988.

Member Comments:
This article has expired. No more comments may be added.
 
A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2RRA on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Very Good Article!

We prepare for these contests and most don't realize what we may be doing to our health.

"When the contests came, I noticed an incredible benefit of the exercise. It was as though the physical demands of the contest had disappeared! I was able to stay awake more easily and my muscles were not as tired during the contest. Without the physical drag, I was able to focus all of my energy to battling the mental fatigue. One result was a 48-hour effort (no sleep) from K3TUP for a win and new USA record in the CQ WW CW. In retrospect, any 3 hours of sleep would have cost me the record and possibly the contest. Another benefit of the exercise was 25 pounds of lost weight!"

It's a proven medical fact that weight increase creates sleep napia, muscle and mental fatigue, depression and diabetes. You cant run a contest under these conditions let alone function properly in life.

So exercise to keep healthy to function better in everyday life and increase chances in winning contests.

There it is folks!

73,
Eric





 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by NV2A on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Darn good article for me. Just the kind of contest information I've been seeking. It's hard to get guys to talk about band strategy and such so us rookies never stand a chance!

That article is over 20 years old, be curious to hear back from the author to see if he finds staying awake any harder now that that he is 20 years older ! LOL
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by G3LBS on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
All attempts at will-power and training are fruitless for contests. The best thing is hypnosis, applied until you welcome insomnia.
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K0BG on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Actually, it appeared 8 years ago, but perhaps the posted question is still valid.

Speaking only for myself, I manage to handle contests quite easily. Depending on the time of day, I either roll over and go back to sleep, or I find something else to do besides sit in front of my transceiver.

Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Hello,

I am always reading this kind of articles with a smile...Ham Radio is just a Hobby,very nice Hobby,but just a Hobby...enjoy,but do not kill yourself in the process...

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by WY3X on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I enjoy a little VHF contesting, but I've never gotten so serious about it that I considered for a moment tracking my sleep patterns! If I say you're spending too much time even considering things like this, and you put way too much thought and effort into contesting, would you be insulted? -KR4WM
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Hello,

HF Contesting is a marginal and non-essensial part of Ham Radio activities...take a look at results of main HF Contests,only abt 3000 the same operators are participating in HF Contests in The whole World!!!
DX-ing is huge!!!Hundreds of thousands operators are participating!!!

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K1BXI on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
In this last SS I heard many more automated CQ's than ever before...Wonder how long it will be before the whole exchange will be automated and one can sleep right through the whole contest and still win.

For me.........it's either hit the WARC bands or complete some honey do's.....guess which wins out.

John
 
A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N0AH on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I typically avoid the first hour or two of any major contest with the stress that goes with it- I also consider going single basnd in CQWW's to avoid being all things to all contestors- Save your awake hours for the second day when you are new meat on the band and run stations using your 100 watts-
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
N0AH Wrote:"I typically avoid the first hour or two of any major contest with the stress that goes with it- I also consider going single basnd in CQWW's to avoid being all things to all contestors- Save your awake hours for the second day when you are new meat on the band and run stations using your 100 watts"

Yes...you are so right!!!Take it easy,this is just a Hobby!!!
Some Contesters are so stress out...more then Marines storming Ivo Jima!!!

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K3AN on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
John, why don't you tell us how you really feel.
 
A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by W5PJW on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
My strategy for last weekend's SS was to take a nap the first couple of hours, then watch a movie on TV, then go out to dinner with the XYL. By about 8-9PM local time I was ready so warmed-up by playing some Johnny Cash tunes on the guitar. This had me hankering for the real thing so I watched some Cash videos on YouTube. Then I read awhile. By then I figured I should rest up and give it a go Sunday so I went to bed. Sunday morning I did some chores, a few fixits around the house. I then went shopping for clothes. That's when the real deprivation came in as I hate shopping for clothes, meanwhile on 20 meters....

OK, enough teasing folks. I like dabbling in contests from time to time for checking out a new shack layout, keys, mic, antenna, nabbing some new countries, or just knocking out some contacts, etc. Sometimes I'll use boatanchors just for grins. Sometimes not. I work hard enough during the week so getting all stressed-out and worn-out over a ham contest seems unwise and unhealthy to me. YMMV. Lighten up a bit. To each his own I suppose. At least we get some activity on the upper bands!

73,

Mark
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by G3LBS on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I am astonished at the lack of dedication among us. For example one contributor implies that ham radio is a hobby, whereas we should all know that it is not a hobby, nor a way of life, but is life itself.
W2/G3LBS
 
A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K1CJS on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
A sleep strategy to consider is this--sleep through contests!! ;-)
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2EY on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Great article - thank you!

Now to get ready for Field Day....

73 de Jim, N2EY
 
A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by KC9MAV on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Very good read for me.
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K5END on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
".it's either hit the WARC bands or complete some honey do's.....guess which wins out."

Let's see... 17 meters or fix the cheap-a&& window blinds I told her not to buy in the first place (which is probably why she bought them.)

WARC beats Wife, every time.
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2RRA on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
"You can lead a horse to water but you can't make him drink"

"Some will get and some won't"

Once again! Great article from an all around prospective being very useful as an everyday health warning and applying it even to Amateur Radio related subject.
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by AB7E on November 18, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
N2KFC: "
HF Contesting is a marginal and non-essensial (sic) part of Ham Radio activities...take a look at results of main HF Contests,only abt 3000 the same operators are participating in HF Contests in The whole World!!!
DX-ing is huge!!!Hundreds of thousands operators are participating!!! "


Why make such a skewed comment? Almost ALL of ham radio is non-essential, but you have your figures backward. There are less than 25,000 hams with mixed DXCC status (easy to achieve), but the most recent K5ZD Super Check Partial file of hams who have participated in the major contests within the past two years totals more than 140,000 unique callsigns. Most just don't turn in logs, and if fact most people who participate in DX contests are DXers who do so purely to snag new ones. There's no evidence at all that DXing and contesting are mutually exclusive. Even accounting for the large number of hams who like to DX but don't pursue the DXCC award, the participation ratio you're trying to portray is bogus.

The simplest measure of where contesting fits in ham radio, however, is simply to listen on the bands. Even minor contests generate more activity than general ragchewing, and I hear the more common DX stations calling CQ with virtually no takers most of the time. About the only exception to that is on the digital modes, where almost any DX station gets a fan club.

I'm not saying that contesting should have any greater status than any other ham activity, but it should be pretty clear to anyone with an HF receiver that contesting draws a much bigger crowd than anything else ... in spite of the fact that there are so many of them. I can understand why non-contesters don't like contests, but it certainly isn't because they represent a marginal activity. Just the opposite is the case, and if contesting wasn't as least as popular as whatever you're interested in you wouldn't have felt the need to disparage it.
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 19, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
AB7E Wrote:"the most recent K5ZD Super Check Partial file of hams who have participated in the major contests within the past two years totals more than 140,000 unique callsigns. Most just don't turn in logs"

"most just don't turn in logs"!!!-no log,no participation in Contest!!!My numbers are very correct!!!

Contests do not make activity,contests are killing activity!!!Nothing is more annoying for most Ham Operators,when on almost every Saturday and Sunday,when they turn on their radios they are getting:CQ Contest 599/599,CQ Contest 59/59,CQ Contest 599/599,Cq Contest 59/59...
TOO MANY CONTESTS!!!We have to take our Bands back from Contest Mafia!!!

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 19, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
AB7E Wrote:"The simplest measure of where contesting fits in ham radio, however, is simply to listen on the bands. Even minor contests generate more activity than general ragchewing, and I hear the more common DX stations calling CQ with virtually no takers most of the time. About the only exception to that is on the digital modes, where almost any DX station gets a fan club. "

What a non-sense!!!I am DX myself and when I am operating from The South Pacific,after a short CQ DX in just 30 seconds-thanks to DX Summit-I am getting huge Pile-up!!!Times are different now,DX Summit is great!!!

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K1CJS on November 19, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
>>Contests do not make activity,contests are killing activity!!!Nothing is more annoying for most Ham Operators,when on almost every Saturday and Sunday,when they turn on their radios they are getting:CQ Contest 599/599,CQ Contest 59/59,CQ Contest 599/599,Cq Contest 59/59...<<

I wouldn't go to either extreme here, but it certainly is disconcerting when you're casually operating and can't hear anything but what the author has said. The WARC bands are still there, true, but depending on conditions, they're sometimes limiting--and sometimes next to useless.

When a ham operator is on the other bands and does manage to find a contact who is not involved in those contests, it is only a matter of time before the exchange is interrupted by someone looking for a contact for their contest log. The reasons? Either incompetence--or stupidity, depending--or just plain lack of courtesy. Take your pick. Whichever you choose you would probably be right.

One other thing, someone may say the person trying for the contact can't hear one side or the other of the conversation. That is not a good reason for interrupting, since one ham doesn't make contact and hold a conversation with.....nobody else.

 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K1CJS on November 19, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Sorry, I said "...what the author has said." when I meant "...what this commenter has said."
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by W4LGH on November 19, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Isn't it funny, with ALL the NEW articles being written everyday, that eHam keeps putting up OLD ONES!

<-- 5KC)..CQ CONTEST, CQ CONTEST..(5KC --> No I will not move, but you are #2303 & 59. (and NO I will NOT allow you to legally sign off) CQ Contest, CQ Contest...

Nuff said....
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by KF4HR on November 19, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
After 40+ years of being licensed, I've never got bitten by the contest bug or felt the need to compete for a contest score, but each to their own. Although one thing about contest operation has always eluded me...

As most of us know, modern computers are very good at performing routine tasks, very quickly. I think most contest operators would agree that exchanging callsigns, grid squares, exchange of the infamous (and occasionally accurate) 5-9 signal reports, state, and/or perhaps a sequential qso number is a repetitive event, and in fact most good contesters record the necessary information and keep pushing their "playback button" which keys their rig and spits out all or most of this repetitive information, which is a nice automation feature. So I wonder...

What would it take for some really good programmer come up with a way for a PC to run the whole contest event, 100% automatically? Let's think about this... a PC tied into the whole station; computer controlled transceiver, rotators, logging, dup checks, internet DX links, etc, so... monitoring through the transceiver with really good speech recongnition software cross checking calls with a callsign database and monitoring internet DX spots the PC switches the rig to bands that are open looking for and locking onto a clear frequencies to operate on which have the necessary bandwidth so as not to cause interference to other operators (well... that part was meant to be a joke), then switch and rotate antennas as necessary, keep a constant check on DX spots to compute and look for the best multipliers, monitoring sub-band conditions to switch modes if necessary, and of course do all the logging and dup checks are automatically performed, then all the contest operator would need to do is pre-program the contest software to start the contest at the appropriate time and let 'er rip!

So... imagine the contest operator could be off watching the game (or two or three), walking the dog... whatever, then checks back later to see how his/her contest station scored!

But alas, should this auto-contest scenario ever came to pass, we wouldn't be enjoying Sleep Strategy articles such as this. Never mind. ;^))

KF4HR

 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by KC2RGW on November 19, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Sleep through the whole thing, please. This way hams can actually use the bands instead.

-- a ham who likes to talk to people
 
A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by KE4ZHN on November 19, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Contests put me to sleep. To each his own I guess, but listening to the same repetitious drivel for 48 hours is just not for me.
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 19, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Hello,
Contesting is not a problem "per say" ,but the fact ,that we have too many Contests,they are mostly on Weekends and most Contest operators do not respect The Fundamental Law of Radiocommunication-FREQUENCY in USE!!!

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by KA5JRX on November 19, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I am not a contester and will never be one. I just don't like that kind of nonsense. When I turn on the radio in hopes of engaging in a QSO and hear a contest I usually just shut it down and let them have the bands. It is not what I think Ham should be. It seems to me that contesters are very rude, they do not use proper procedures and what really disappoints me is when I can tell when they are using computer aid of some sort. Computer CW is for monkey operators not Hams. But when contesters are in control of the bands, sooner or later they get worn out or their contest ends and poof they are gone to monkeyham land and then the real operators can do some DX communicating. Enjoy.
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K5ML on November 19, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I enjoy DX contests for fun but never take them seriously or send my scores in. I like to see how many countries I can work QRP, see if I can pick up a new country, experiment with a new antenna, etc. As for sleep deprivation, any time I have to endure that kind of pain and suffering I want to be paid for it. Being a professional ham pays poorly.
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K5MO on November 19, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
A very nice article.

I'm only a dabbler in contests, but I enjoy them, and I respect the abilities of those who are this good at it.
Thanks for writing it.... you guys rock!

John
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by NV2A on November 19, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
To you nay-sayers about contesting I have to agree to this extent, it's just a hobby. But let me say this, if you were in a fox hole in a war zone you should hope to be surrounded by contesters and not those content to just chew the fat or lay on the couch. These are guys who set goals and try to meet them just to better themselves.

I'm just getting back into hamming. I can tell you this, when there are no contest on, the bands are pretty sparsely occupied except for cliché's. Sounds to me like a lot of guys are really into contesting, trying to make a mark for themselves or really trying to push the strategy envelope. We shouldn't be so hard on them. Far more effort goes into contesting then every goes into rag chewing.

N0AH, thanks for the validation! Your strategy was one I thought might work for my barefoot station. Fresh meat should always get attention near the end of a contest :D
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 19, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
NV2A Wrote:"But let me say this, if you were in a fox hole in a war zone you should hope to be surrounded by contesters and not those content to just chew the fat or lay on the couch. These are guys who set goals and try to meet them just to better themselves. "

Are you sure???I rather have somebody who can shoot "straight"!!!

What a non-sense...

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by 5R8GQ on November 19, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Author said
"Not drinking very much has the benefit of reducing the number of trips to the bathroom. However, this must be balanced against the danger of dehydration. I have lost as much as 5 pounds during the course of one contest!".

Just my opinion, but if you drink so little to avoid trips to the toilet, (come ON, how long does it take to pee?)and in the course lose 5 pounds over the course of the contest, you are taking this
activity wayyyyy too seriously. No, I am not an anti-contester, far from it. I do enjoy contesting very much, especially RTTY. I have done fairly well at it and have the plaques and wallpaper to go with it.

My main goal is have fun, not necessarily win, and not abuse my body in the process. Some of us have to actually (GASP!) go to work the Monday after the contest.

Overall, I thought it was a good article.
Thanks for sharing it with us.
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K5ZD on November 20, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I do find staying awake for 40+ hours in a DX contest easier now than I did when I was younger. Never expected that. I think it is partly due to being older and needing/getting less sleep and also more experience at how sleep deprivation feels and how to deal with it.

I appreciate everyone's comments on the article. I understand not everyone enjoys contests. I don't like it when I go to the golf course and find a tournament being held. But, I respect the fact that people like to compete and should have that opportunity.

As with any competitive activity the participants may have different levels of intensity. I see contesting as a special type of competition that allows the serious and not so serious to all play on the same field. Imagine the Boston Marathon, but you can run any part of the course you want at any time during the race! The serious guys have to do the whole 26 miles, but you can do whatever part(s) you want.

 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 20, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
K5ZD Wrote:"I appreciate everyone's comments on the article. I understand not everyone enjoys contests. I don't like it when I go to the golf course and find a tournament being held. But, I respect the fact that people like to compete and should have that opportunity"

Absolutely Randy,you should have oportunity to compete!!!But I think that you agree with me ,that to do this,you do not need Contest almost every Weekend.
I think that from Competition point of view,6 Contests per calendar year 3 CW and 3 SSB ,ARE MORE THEN ENOUGH...

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 20, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
K5ZD Wrote:"As with any competitive activity the participants may have different levels of intensity. I see contesting as a special type of competition that allows the serious and not so serious to all play on the same field"

Yes,I agree with you...I think that Competition Grade Contester is somebody Who is making 1000 or more QSO's in any Main Contest...This could be very interesting if you scan you Contests logs Data Base for operators who are making over 1000 QSO's per Conntest...I think that this will be rather very short list!!!

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: THE HAM CONTESTER AND WAR  
by PLANKEYE on November 20, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
NV2A:

To you nay-sayers about contesting I have to agree to this extent, it's just a hobby. But let me say this, if you were in a fox hole in a war zone you should hope to be surrounded by contesters and not those content to just chew the fat or lay on the couch. These are guys who set goals and try to meet them just to better themselves.


_____________________________________________

PLANKEYE:

If I was in a fox hole your dag-gum right I'd want a Ham Contester with me.

You people CRAZY? Who else would you want?

Might even Throw-Em a 10 Meter Surprise, if things got hairy!



Keep the Silly String on the Trip Wires Fellas!

I got to go!




PLANKEYE




 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by NN3W on November 21, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
"Absolutely Randy,you should have oportunity to compete!!!But I think that you agree with me ,that to do this,you do not need Contest almost every Weekend.
I think that from Competition point of view,6 Contests per calendar year 3 CW and 3 SSB ,ARE MORE THEN ENOUGH... "

This is the fallacy that non-contest anger has engendered. Misinformation.

There are 52 weekends in a calendar year (sometimes 53); there are six major contests in a year - CQWW, WPX, IARU, WAE, SS, ARRL DX, and RDXC. Chances are that if you were on 20 meter SSB, you'd hear contest activity on every frequency from 14.150 to 14.350 during these contests.

The aforementioned contests represent 240 hours in a year. That equates 9.8% of weekend hours in a year and 2.7% of hours for all days in a year.

I am not seeing how 9.8% is going to materially change the world. You have 90% of the time to operate contest free on 20 SSB. And, you have 100% of the time to operate contest free if you utilize 20 CW during the SSB contest, utilize any of the 3 WARC bands, or employ some common sense.
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 21, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
NN3W Wrote:"There are 52 weekends in a calendar year (sometimes 53); there are six major contests in a year - CQWW, WPX, IARU, WAE, SS, ARRL DX, and RDXC. Chances are that if you were on 20 meter SSB, you'd hear contest activity on every frequency from 14.150 to 14.350 during these contests. "

What a non-sense...we have some kind of Contest almost every weekend!!!Contests are not a problem "per say",but the fact that most Contesters do not respect The Fundamental Law of Radiocommunication-FREQUENCY in USE!!!
Most Ham Operstors have time to operate and enjoy Hobby on the Weekends,and Monday they are going to work or school!!!Contesters have a lot of time on Monday they are sleeping after contest!!!Ha!Ha!Ha!

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by NN3W on November 21, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
"What a non-sense...we have some kind of Contest almost every weekend!!!Contests are not a problem "per say",but the fact that most Contesters do not respect The Fundamental Law of Radiocommunication-FREQUENCY in USE!!!
Most Ham Operstors have time to operate and enjoy Hobby on the Weekends,and Monday they are going to work or school!!!Contesters have a lot of time on Monday they are sleeping after contest!!!Ha!Ha!Ha! "

There is some type of contest, but 99% of the contests have close to ZERO effect on the bands.

The Run for the Bacon ARCI Sprint has close to ZERO effect on the bands.
The Montana QSO Party has close to ZERO effect on the bands.
The ARRL 10 Meter contest (by definition) has zero effect on every band except 10 meters.

Are you really going to come on here and tell us that you were unable to operate on your favorite frequency on 20 meters because the ARRL 10 meter contest was under way?

Are you really going to come on here and tell us that you were unable to operate because the RSGB 80m Club Sprint or the NAQCC Straight Key/Bug Sprint was underway?

The overwhelming majority of contests have no more activity or participation than does a DX net, a lighthouse special event activation, or a maritime net.

Again, you're confusing reading contest calendars with reality.
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by VA3BRR on November 21, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I like the strategy. I usually work with one other op so we try to get a small nap in while the other is operating, but since we have no good low band antennas, we often get a fair bit of rest late in the night.

As for a succesful diet for contesting, we always have a slowcooker full of homemade soup going. It warms you, is nutritious, filling, etc. Then we can have a bowl/mug of it as we get hungry, as often as we are tempted, it's not so heavy that it drags us down.
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 21, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
NN3W Wrote:"There is some type of contest, but 99% of the contests have close to ZERO effect on the bands. "

What a non-sense!!!
Contests are not a problem "per say",but the fact that most Contesters do not respect The Fundamental Law of Radiocommunication-FREQUENCY in USE!!!
It is time to take our Ham Bands back from contest Mafia!!!

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,

 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by NN3W on November 21, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Wait, you're original premise was that there was a contest on every weekend and that there need not be a contest every weekend.

I rebutted that claim by pointing out that 99% of the contests on during a year have no effect on the amateur bands, and that the active contests represent less than 10% of the weekend time in a year, and less than 3% of all time in a calendar year.

Now you've essentially argued away the point by reversing course and focusing on operating practices, I'll have to assume that you concede that the issue of contesting on "all of the weekends" is simply a red herring simply used to incite anger against contests in general.

As to your claims that "Contesters do not respect The Fundamental Law of Radio Communication-FREQUENCY in USE!!!," I'll note that it was a Texas swap net that this past weekend chose to ignore my presence on 7.245 and attempted to jam my communications by conducting a net when the frequency was already in use - by me.

So perhaps the issue of "Fundamental Law of Radio," is one that is an issue with entities other than simply contesters (e.g., DX nets, swap nets, mobile nets, prostate nets and individiduals who believe that they have operated on a frequency since before Maxwell was born).
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 21, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
NN3W Wrote:"As to your claims that "Contesters do not respect The Fundamental Law of Radio Communication-FREQUENCY in USE!!!," I'll note that it was a Texas swap net that this past weekend chose to ignore my presence on 7.245 and attempted to jam my communications by conducting a net when the frequency was already in use - by me. "

Well...if they did how you said...so they did wrong!!!I agree with you...so,I am sure,that you agree with me that Contesters who do not respect The Fundamental law of Radiocommunication-FREQUENCY in USE...ARE WRONG TOO!!!

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by NN3W on November 21, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I'm not going to disagree with the fundamental premise, but I will disagree with the notion that the amateur bands are essentially channelized such that incursion within 2.5 KHz constitutes intereference. Many nets believe they're entitled to a 5.0 or 6.0 KHz clear channel.

Simple not realistic under any environment.
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by W0RER on November 22, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
To me, contesting is a test against myself every time I operate in one...I know I will never get a first place prize from my Denver QTH with moderate antennas, but there is something about improving upon my scores each year that is satifying to me.

One interesting thing I always notice after a large contest is that when the contest comes to an end, the bands go virtually completely silent. Where are all of those ops who can't stand contests? I think those who complain about contesting are overstating how much of a problem contests really are to them...otherwise, shouldn't the bands be full of operators who are hankering for a rag chew right after the contests??

C'mon boys and girls...there is always a clear frequency somewhere and on some mode...plenty of room for everyone...

Catch you later...

David (WK0P)
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 22, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Contests Paranoia!!!

This is quotation of Contests List done by WA7BNM:

"WA7BNM 12-Month Contest Calendar
Last updated October 1, 2008

February, 2008
NCCC Sprint 0330Z-0400Z, Feb 1
Vermont QSO Party 0000Z, Feb 2 to 2400Z, Feb 3
YL-ISSB QSO Party, CW/RTTY 0000Z, Feb 2 to 2359Z, Feb 3
10-10 Int. Winter Contest, SSB 0001Z, Feb 2 to 2359Z, Feb 3
NCCC Sprint 0330Z-0400Z, Feb 2
YLRL YL-OM Contest, CW 1400Z, Feb 2 to 0200Z, Feb 4
FYBO Winter QRP Sprint 1400Z-2400Z, Feb 2
Minnesota QSO Party 1400Z-2400Z, Feb 2
AGCW Straight Key Party 1600Z-1900Z, Feb 2
Delaware QSO Party 1700Z, Feb 2 to 0500Z, Feb 3 and
1300Z, Feb 3 to 0100Z, Feb 4
Mexico RTTY International Contest 1800Z, Feb 2 to 1759Z, Feb 3
North American Sprint, CW 0000Z-0400Z, Feb 3
ARCI Fireside SSB Sprint 2000Z-2359Z, Feb 3
RSGB 80m Club Championship, SSB 2000Z-2130Z, Feb 4
ARS Spartan Sprint 0200Z-0400Z, Feb 5
NCCC Sprint 0330Z-0400Z, Feb 8
CQ WW RTTY WPX Contest 0000Z, Feb 9 to 2400Z, Feb 10
New Hampshire QSO Party 0001Z, Feb 9 to 0001Z, Feb 10
NCCC Sprint 0330Z-0400Z, Feb 9
SARL Field Day Contest 1000Z, Feb 9 to 1000Z, Feb 10
Asia-Pacific Spring Sprint, CW 1100Z-1300Z, Feb 9
Dutch PACC Contest 1200Z, Feb 9 to 1200Z, Feb 10
KCJ Topband Contest 1200Z, Feb 9 to 1200Z, Feb 10
YLRL YL-OM Contest, SSB 1400Z, Feb 9 to 0200Z, Feb 11
Louisiana QSO Party 1500Z, Feb 9 to 0300Z, Feb 10
OMISS QSO Party 1500Z, Feb 9 to 1500Z, Feb 10
British Columbia QSO Challenge 1600Z, Feb 9 to 0359Z, Feb 10
FISTS Winter Sprint 1700Z-2100Z, Feb 9
RSGB 1st 1.8 MHz Contest, CW 2100Z, Feb 9 to 0100Z, Feb 10
North American Sprint, SSB 0000Z-0400Z, Feb 10
SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 0000Z-2400Z, Feb 10
ARRL School Club Roundup 1300Z, Feb 11 to 2400Z, Feb 15
NAQCC Straight Key/Bug Sprint 0130Z-0330Z, Feb 13
RSGB 80m Club Championship, Data 2000Z-2130Z, Feb 13
NCCC Sprint 0330Z-0400Z, Feb 15
PODXS 070 Club Valentine Sprint 2000 local, Feb 15 to 0200 local, Feb 16
ARRL Inter. DX Contest, CW 0000Z, Feb 16 to 2400Z, Feb 17
Feld Hell Sprint 1500Z-1700Z, Feb 16
Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0200Z-0400Z, Feb 18
AGCW Semi-Automatic Key Evening 1900Z-2030Z, Feb 20
RSGB 80m Club Championship, CW 2000Z-2130Z, Feb 21
NCCC Sprint 0330Z-0400Z, Feb 22
Russian PSK WW Contest 2100Z, Feb 22 to 2100Z, Feb 23
CQ 160-Meter Contest, SSB 0000Z, Feb 23 to 2359Z, Feb 24
REF Contest, SSB 0600Z, Feb 23 to 1800Z, Feb 24
UBA DX Contest, CW 1300Z, Feb 23 to 1300Z, Feb 24
Mississippi QSO Party 1500Z, Feb 23 to 0300Z, Feb 24
North American QSO Party, RTTY 1800Z, Feb 23 to 0600Z, Feb 24
High Speed Club CW Contest 0900Z-1100Z, Feb 24 and
1500Z-1700Z, Feb 24
North Carolina QSO Party 1700Z, Feb 24 to 0300Z, Feb 25
SKCC Sprint 0100Z-0300Z, Feb 27
NCCC Sprint 0330Z-0400Z, Feb 29
March, 2008
ARRL Inter. DX Contest, SSB 0000Z, Mar 1 to 2400Z, Mar 2
Wake-Up! QRP Sprint 0400Z-0429Z, Mar 1 and
0430Z-0459Z, Mar 1 and
0500Z-0529Z, Mar 1 and
0530Z-0600Z, Mar 1
Open Ukraine RTTY Championship 2200Z-2359Z, Mar 1 (Low Band) and
0000Z-0159Z, Mar 2 (Low Band) and
0800Z-1159Z, Mar 2 (High Band)
DARC 10-Meter Digital Contest 1100Z-1700Z, Mar 2
RSGB 80m Club Championship, Data 2000Z-2130Z, Mar 3
AGCW YL-CW Party 1900Z-2100Z, Mar 4
NCCC Sprint Ladder 0330Z-0400Z, Mar 7
HA3NS Sprint Memorial Contest 1830Z-1900Z, Mar 7 (80m) and
1900Z-1930Z, Mar 7 (40m)
RSGB Commonwealth Contest 1000Z, Mar 8 to 1000Z, Mar 9
AGCW QRP Contest 1400Z-2000Z, Mar 8
Oklahoma QSO Party 1400Z, Mar 8 to 0200Z, Mar 9 and
1300Z-1900Z, Mar 9
EA PSK31 Contest 1600Z, Mar 8 to 1600Z, Mar 9
SOC Marathon Sprint 1800Z-2400Z, Mar 8
Idaho QSO Party 1900Z, Mar 8 to 1900Z, Mar 9
North American Sprint, RTTY 0000Z-0400Z, Mar 9
SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 0000Z-2400Z, Mar 9
UBA Spring Contest, CW 0700Z-1100Z, Mar 9
NSARA Contest 1100Z-1500Z, Mar 9 and
1700Z-2100Z, Mar 9
Wisconsin QSO Party 1800Z, Mar 9 to 0100Z, Mar 10
CLARA and Family HF Contest 1700Z, Mar 11 to 1700Z, Mar 12 and
1700Z, Mar 15 to 1700Z, Mar 16
RSGB 80m Club Championship, CW 2000Z-2130Z, Mar 12
NCCC Sprint Ladder 0230Z-0300Z, Mar 14
10-10 Int. Mobile Contest 0001Z-2359Z, Mar 15
Russian DX Contest 1200Z, Mar 15 to 1200Z, Mar 16
Feld Hell Sprint 1500Z-1700Z, Mar 15
AGCW VHF/UHF Contest 1600Z-1900Z, Mar 15 (144) and
1900Z-2100Z, Mar 15 (432)
Virginia QSO Party 1800Z, Mar 15 to 0200Z, Mar 17
UBA Spring Contest, 6m 0700Z-1100Z, Mar 16
9K 15-Meter Contest 1200Z-1600Z, Mar 16
ARCI HF Grid Square Sprint 1500Z-1800Z, Mar 16
Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0100Z-0300Z, Mar 17
Bucharest Contest 1500Z-1559Z, Mar 17 and
1600Z-1659Z, Mar 17
NAQCC Straight Key/Bug Sprint 0030Z-0230Z, Mar 20
RSGB 80m Club Championship, SSB 2000Z-2130Z, Mar 20
ARLHS Annual Spring Lites QSO Party 0001Z, Mar 21 to 2359Z, Mar 30
NCCC Sprint Ladder 0230Z-0300Z, Mar 21
BARTG HF RTTY Contest 0200Z, Mar 22 to 0200Z, Mar 24
UBA Spring Contest, 2m 0600Z-1000Z, Mar 23
Low Power Spring Sprint 1400Z-2000Z, Mar 24
BCC QSO Party 1800Z-2000Z, Mar 25
SKCC Sprint 0000Z-0200Z, Mar 26
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Mar 28
CQ WW WPX Contest, SSB 0000Z, Mar 29 to 2359Z, Mar 30
April, 2008
Montana QSO Party 0000Z, Apr 4 to 2400Z, Apr 5
NCCC Sprint Ladder 0230Z-0300Z, Apr 4
YLRL DX-YL to NA-YL Contest, CW 1400Z, Apr 4 to 0200Z, Apr 6
ARCI Spring QSO Party 1200Z, Apr 5 to 2359Z, Apr 6
SP DX Contest 1500Z, Apr 5 to 1500Z, Apr 6
EA RTTY Contest 1600Z, Apr 5 to 1600Z, Apr 6
QCWA Spring QSO Party 1800Z, Apr 5 to 1800Z, Apr 6
Missouri QSO Party 1800Z, Apr 5 to 0500Z, Apr 6 and
1800Z-2400Z, Apr 6
RSGB RoPoCo 1 0700Z-0900Z, Apr 6
RSGB 80m Club Championship, CW 1900Z-2030Z, Apr 7
144 MHz Spring Sprint 1900 local - 2300 local, Apr 7
NAQCC Straight Key/Bug Sprint 0030Z-0230Z, Apr 9
NCCC Sprint Ladder 0230Z-0300Z, Apr 11
YLRL DX-YL to NA-YL Contest, SSB 1400Z, Apr 11 to 0200Z, Apr 13
JIDX CW Contest 0700Z, Apr 12 to 1300Z, Apr 13
Radio Maritime Day 1200Z, Apr 12 to 1200Z, Apr 13
PODXS 070 Club PSK 31 Flavors Contest 1200-1800 local, Apr 12
EU Spring Sprint, CW 1600Z-1959Z, Apr 12
Georgia QSO Party 1800Z, Apr 12 to 0359Z, Apr 13 and
1400Z-2359Z, Apr 13
Yuri Gagarin International DX Contest 2100Z, Apr 12 to 2100Z, Apr 13
SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 0000Z-2400Z, Apr 13
UBA Spring Contest, SSB 0600Z-1000Z, Apr 13
222 MHz Spring Sprint 1900 local - 2300 local, Apr 15
RSGB 80m Club Championship, SSB 1900Z-2030Z, Apr 16
NCCC Sprint Ladder 0230Z-0300Z, Apr 18
Holyland DX Contest 0000Z-2359Z, Apr 19
TARA Skirmish Digital Prefix Contest 0000Z-2400Z, Apr 19
ES Open HF Championship 0500Z-0559Z, Apr 19 and
0600Z-0659Z, Apr 19 and
0700Z-0759Z, Apr 19 and
0800Z-0859Z, Apr 19
Feld Hell Sprint 1500Z-1700Z, Apr 19
EU Spring Sprint, SSB 1600Z-1959Z, Apr 19
Michigan QSO Party 1600Z, Apr 19 to 0400Z, Apr 20
EA-QRP CW Contest 1700Z-2000Z, Apr 19 (20-10m) and
2000Z-2300Z, Apr 19 (80m) and
0700Z-1100Z, Apr 20 (40m) and
1100Z-1300Z, Apr 20 (20-10m)
Ontario QSO Party 1800Z, Apr 19 to 0500Z, Apr 20 and
1200Z-1800Z, Apr 20
YU DX Contest 2100Z, Apr 19 to 0500Z, Apr 20 and
0900Z-1700Z, Apr 20
Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0100Z-0300Z, Apr 21
SKCC Sprint 0000Z-0200Z, Apr 23
432 MHz Spring Sprint 1900 local - 2300 local, Apr 23
RSGB 80m Club Championship, Data 1900Z-2030Z, Apr 24
NCCC Sprint Ladder 0230Z-0300Z, Apr 25
SP DX RTTY Contest 1200Z, Apr 26 to 1200Z, Apr 27
Helvetia Contest 1300Z, Apr 26 to 1259Z, Apr 27
QRP to the Field 1500Z, Apr 26 to 0300Z, Apr 27
Florida QSO Party 1600Z, Apr 26 to 0159Z, Apr 27 and
1200Z-2159Z, Apr 27
Nebraska QSO Party 1700Z, Apr 26 to 1700Z, Apr 27
May, 2008
AGCW QRP/QRP Party 1300Z-1900Z, May 1
QRP Minimal Art Session 1900Z-2300Z, May 1
NCCC Sprint Ladder 0230Z-0300Z, May 2
MARAC SSB QSO Party 0000Z, May 3 to 2400Z, May 4
MARAC CW QSO Party 0000Z, May 3 to 2400Z, May 4
10-10 Int. Spring Contest, CW 0001Z, May 3 to 2359Z, May 4
10-10 Int. Spring Contest, Digital 0001Z, May 3 to 2359Z, May 4
Microwave Spring Sprint 0600-1300 local, May 3
7th Call Area QSO Party 1300Z, May 3 to 0700Z, May 4
Portuguese Navy Day Contest 1500Z, May 3 to 1500Z, May 4
Indiana QSO Party 1600Z, May 3 to 0400Z, May 4
ARI International DX Contest 2000Z, May 3 to 1959Z, May 4
New England QSO Party 2000Z, May 3 to 0500Z, May 4 and
1300Z-2400Z, May 4
RSGB 80m Club Championship, SSB 1900Z-2030Z, May 5
NCCC Sprint Ladder 0230Z-0300Z, May 9
Nevada Mustang Roundup 2300Z, May 9 to 2300Z, May 10
SBMS 2 GHz and Up WW Club Contest 0600 local, May 10 to 2000 local, May 11
VK/Trans-Tasman 80m Contest, Phone 0800Z-1400Z, May 10
EUCW Fraternizing CW QSO Party 1000Z-1200Z, May 10 and
1800Z-2000Z, May 11
CQ-M International DX Contest 1200Z, May 10 to 1159Z, May 11
VOLTA WW RTTY Contest 1200Z, May 10 to 1200Z, May 11
FISTS Spring Sprint 1700Z-2100Z, May 10
50 MHz Spring Sprint 2300Z, May 10 to 0300Z, May 11
SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 0000Z-2400Z, May 11
RSGB 80m Club Championship, Data 1900Z-2030Z, May 14
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, May 16
EU PSK DX Contest 1200Z, May 17 to 1200Z, May 18
His Maj. King of Spain Contest, CW 1200Z, May 17 to 1200Z, May 18
Manchester Mineira All America CW Contest 1500Z, May 17 to 2359Z, May 18
Baltic Contest 2100Z, May 17 to 0200Z, May 18
Feld Hell Sprint 2200Z-2400Z, May 17
Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0100Z-0300Z, May 19
NAQCC Straight Key/Bug Sprint 0030Z-0230Z, May 22
RSGB 80m Club Championship, CW 1900Z-2030Z, May 22
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, May 23
CQ WW WPX Contest, CW 0000Z, May 24 to 2359Z, May 25
VK/Trans-Tasman 80m Contest, CW 0800Z-1300Z, May 24
ARCI Hootowl Sprint 2000 local - 2400 local, May 25
MI QRP Memorial Day CW Sprint 2300Z, May 26 to 0300Z, May 27
SKCC Sprint 0000Z-0200Z, May 28
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, May 30
Kids Roundup 1400Z, May 31 to 2200Z, Jun 1
June, 2008
RSGB 80m Club Championship, Data 1900Z-2030Z, Jun 2
NCCC Sprint Ladder 0230Z-0300Z, Jun 6
Digital Pentathlon 1800Z-2200Z, Jun 6
PVRC Reunion On-the-Air 0000Z, Jun 7 to 2359Z, Jun 8
Wake-Up! QRP Sprint 0400Z-0429Z, Jun 7 and
0430Z-0459Z, Jun 7 and
0500Z-0529Z, Jun 7 and
0530Z-0600Z, Jun 7
DigiFest 0400Z-1200Z, Jun 7 and
2000Z, Jun 7 to 0400Z, Jun 8 and
1200Z-2000Z, Jun 8
SEANET Contest 1200Z, Jun 7 to 1200Z, Jun 8
UKSMG Summer Contest 1200Z, Jun 7 to 1200Z, Jun 8
RSGB National Field Day 1500Z, Jun 7 to 1500Z, Jun 8
IARU Region 1 Field Day, CW 1500Z, Jun 7 to 1459Z, Jun 8
Alabama QSO Party 1600Z, Jun 7 to 0400Z, Jun 8
SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 0000Z-2400Z, Jun 8
NAQCC Straight Key/Bug Sprint 0030Z-0230Z, Jun 11
RSGB 80m Club Championship, CW 1900Z-2030Z, Jun 11
NCCC Sprint Ladder 0230Z-0300Z, Jun 13
Digital Pentathlon 1800Z-2200Z, Jun 13
ANARTS WW RTTY Contest 0000Z, Jun 14 to 2400Z, Jun 15
Portugal Day Contest 0000Z-2400Z, Jun 14
Asia-Pacific Sprint, SSB 1100Z-1300Z, Jun 14
GACW WWSA CW DX Contest 1500Z, Jun 14 to 1500Z, Jun 15
REF DDFM 6m Contest 1600Z, Jun 14 to 1600Z, Jun 15
West Virginia QSO Party 1600Z, Jun 14 to 0200Z, Jun 15
ARRL June VHF QSO Party 1800Z, Jun 14 to 0300Z, Jun 16
DIE Contest 0600Z-1200Z, Jun 15
Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0100Z-0300Z, Jun 16
SARL Youth Day Sprint 0800Z-1000Z, Jun 16
RSGB 80m Club Championship, SSB 1900Z-2030Z, Jun 19
NCCC Sprint Ladder 0230Z-0300Z, Jun 20
Digital Pentathlon 1800Z-2200Z, Jun 20
All Asian DX Contest, CW 0000Z, Jun 21 to 2400Z, Jun 22
SMIRK Contest 0000Z, Jun 21 to 2400Z, Jun 22
Feld Hell Sprint 1000Z-1200Z, Jun 21 and
2200Z-2400Z, Jun 21
AGCW VHF/UHF Contest 1600Z-1900Z, Jun 21 (144) and
1900Z-2100Z, Jun 21 (432)
Kid's Day Contest 1800Z-2400Z, Jun 21
SKCC Sprint 0000Z-0200Z, Jun 25
BCC QSO Party 1700Z-1900Z, Jun 25
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Jun 27
Digital Pentathlon 1800Z-2200Z, Jun 27
Ukrainian DX DIGI Contest 1200Z, Jun 28 to 1200Z, Jun 29
His Maj. King of Spain Contest, SSB 1200Z, Jun 28 to 1200Z, Jun 29
Marconi Memorial HF Contest 1400Z, Jun 28 to 1400Z, Jun 29
ARRL Field Day 1800Z, Jun 28 to 2100Z, Jun 29
ARCI Milliwatt Field Day 1800Z, Jun 28 to 2100Z, Jun 29
SARL Digital Contest 1300Z-1600Z, Jun 29
July, 2008
RAC Canada Day Contest 0000Z-2359Z, Jul 1
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Jul 4
Digital Pentathlon 1800Z-2200Z, Jul 4
MI QRP July 4th CW Sprint 2300Z, Jul 4 to 0300Z, Jul 5
Venezuelan Ind. Day Contest 0000Z, Jul 5 to 2359Z, Jul 6
WLOTA Contest 0600Z, Jul 5 to 1200Z, Jul 6
VK/Trans-Tasman 160m Contest, Phone 0800Z-1400Z, Jul 5
DL-DX RTTY Contest 1100Z, Jul 5 to 1059Z, Jul 6
Original QRP Contest 1500Z, Jul 5 to 1500Z, Jul 6
PODXS 070 Club 40m Firecracker Sprint 2000 local, Jul 5 to 0200 local, Jul 6
DARC 10-Meter Digital Contest 1100Z-1700Z, Jul 6
RSGB 80m Club Championship, CW 1900Z-2030Z, Jul 7
NCCC Sprint Ladder 0230Z-0300Z, Jul 11
FISTS Summer Sprint 0000Z-0400Z, Jul 12
IARU HF World Championship 1200Z, Jul 12 to 1200Z, Jul 13
SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 0000Z-2400Z, Jul 13
ARCI Summer Homebrew Sprint 2000Z-2359Z, Jul 13
RSGB 80m Club Championship, SSB 1900Z-2030Z, Jul 16
NAQCC Straight Key/Bug Sprint 0030Z-0230Z, Jul 17
NCCC Sprint Ladder 0230Z-0300Z, Jul 18
Feld Hell Sprint 0200Z-0300Z, Jul 19 and
1000Z-1100Z, Jul 19 and
1800Z-1900Z, Jul 19
Russian Radio Team Championship 0700Z-1459Z, Jul 19
VK/Trans-Tasman 160m Contest, CW 0800Z-1300Z, Jul 19
DMC RTTY Contest 1200Z, Jul 19 to 1200Z, Jul 20
North American QSO Party, RTTY 1800Z, Jul 19 to 0600Z, Jul 20
CQ Worldwide VHF Contest 1800Z, Jul 19 to 2100Z, Jul 20
RSGB Low Power Field Day 0900Z-1200Z and 1300Z-1600Z, Jul 20
CQC Great Colorado Gold Rush 2000Z-2159Z, Jul 20
Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0100Z-0300Z, Jul 21
SKCC Sprint 0000Z-0200Z, Jul 23
RSGB 80m Club Championship, Data 1900Z-2030Z, Jul 24
NCCC Sprint Ladder 0230Z-0300Z, Jul 25
RSGB IOTA Contest 1200Z, Jul 26 to 1200Z, Jul 27
August, 2008
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Aug 1
TARA Grid Dip Shindig 0000Z-2400Z, Aug 2
10-10 Int. Summer Contest, SSB 0001Z, Aug 2 to 2359Z, Aug 3
National Lighthouse Weekend QSO Contest 0001Z, Aug 2 to 2359Z, Aug 9
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Aug 2
European HF Championship 1200Z-2359Z, Aug 2
ARRL UHF Contest 1800Z, Aug 2 to 1800Z, Aug 3
North American QSO Party, CW 1800Z, Aug 2 to 0600Z, Aug 3
RSGB RoPoCo 2 0700Z-0900Z, Aug 3
SARL HF Phone Contest 1300Z-1630Z, Aug 3
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Aug 8
WAE DX Contest, CW 0000Z, Aug 9 to 2359Z, Aug 10
Maryland-DC QSO Party 1600Z, Aug 9 to 0400Z, Aug 10 and
1600Z-2359Z, Aug 10
SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 0000Z-2400Z, Aug 10
MMMonVHF/DUBUS 144 MHz Meteorscatter Sprint Contest 0000Z-2359Z, Aug 12
NAQCC Straight Key/Bug Sprint 0030Z-0230Z, Aug 13
RSGB 80m Club Sprint, CW 1900Z-2030Z, Aug 14
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Aug 15
SARTG WW RTTY Contest 0000Z-0800Z, Aug 16 and
1600Z-2400Z, Aug 16 and
0800Z-1600Z, Aug 17
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Aug 16
ARRL 10 GHz and Up Contest 0600 local, Aug 16 to 2400 local, Aug 17
Russian District Award Contest 0800Z, Aug 16 to 0800Z, Aug 17
Keyman's Club of Japan Contest 1200Z, Aug 16 to 1200Z, Aug 17
Feld Hell Sprint 1400Z-2400Z, Aug 16
ARCI Silent Key Memorial Sprint 1500Z-1800Z, Aug 16
North American QSO Party, SSB 1800Z, Aug 16 to 0600Z, Aug 17
New Jersey QSO Party 2000Z, Aug 16 to 0700Z, Aug 17 and
1300Z, Aug 17 to 0200Z, Aug 18
Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0100Z-0300Z, Aug 18
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Aug 22
Hawaii QSO Party 0700Z, Aug 23 to 2200Z, Aug 24
Ohio QSO Party 1600Z, Aug 23 to 0400Z, Aug 24
SKCC Sprint 0000Z-0200Z, Aug 27
RSGB 80m Club Sprint, SSB 1900Z-2030Z, Aug 27
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Aug 29
ALARA Contest 0600Z, Aug 30 to 1159Z, Aug 31
SCC RTTY Championship 1200Z, Aug 30 to 1159Z, Aug 31
YO DX HF Contest 1200Z, Aug 30 to 1200Z, Aug 31
SARL HF CW Contest 1400Z-1600Z, Aug 31
September, 2008
MI QRP Labor Day CW Sprint 2300Z, Sep 1 to 0300Z, Sep 2
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 5
International G3ZQS Memorial Straight Key Contest 2300Z, Sep 5 to 2300Z, Sep 7
All Asian DX Contest, Phone 0000Z, Sep 6 to 2400Z, Sep 7
Russian RTTY WW Contest 0000Z-2400Z, Sep 6
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 6
Wake-Up! QRP Sprint 0400Z-0429Z, Sep 6 and
0430Z-0459Z, Sep 6 and
0500Z-0529Z, Sep 6 and
0530Z-0600Z, Sep 6
RSGB SSB Field Day 1300Z, Sep 6 to 1300Z, Sep 7
AGCW Straight Key Party 1300Z-1600Z, Sep 6
IARU Region 1 Field Day, SSB 1300Z, Sep 6 to 1259Z, Sep 7
North American Sprint, CW 0000Z-0400Z, Sep 7
DARC 10-Meter Digital Contest 1100Z-1700Z, Sep 7
Tennessee QSO Party 1800Z, Sep 7 to 0300Z, Sep 8
RSGB 80m Club Sprint, SSB 1900Z-2030Z, Sep 11
FISTS Get Your Feet Wet Weekend 0000Z, Sep 12 to 2400Z, Sep 14
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 12
PODXS 070 Club 80m Autumn Sprint 2000 local, Sep 12 to 0200 local, Sep 13
WAE DX Contest, SSB 0000Z, Sep 13 to 2359Z, Sep 14
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 13
Swiss HTC QRP Sprint 1300Z-1900Z, Sep 13
Arkansas QSO Party 1400Z, Sep 13 to 0600Z, Sep 14 and
1500Z-2400Z, Sep 14
ARRL September VHF QSO Party 1800Z, Sep 13 to 0300Z, Sep 15
SOC Marathon Sprint 1800Z-2400Z, Sep 13
North American Sprint, SSB 0000Z-0400Z, Sep 14
SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 0000Z-2400Z, Sep 14
ARCI End of Summer Digital Sprint 2000Z-2359Z, Sep 14
NAQCC Straight Key/Bug Sprint 0030Z-0230Z, Sep 18
YLRL Howdy Days 1400Z, Sep 18 to 0200Z, Sep 20
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 19
ARRL EME Contest 0000Z, Sep 20 to 2359Z, Sep 21
ARRL 10 GHz and Up Contest 0600 local, Sep 20 to 2400 local, Sep 21
Colorado QSO Party 1000Z, Sep 20 to 0400Z, Sep 21
SARL VHF/UHF Contest 1000Z, Sep 20 to 1000Z, Sep 21
Scandinavian Activity Contest, CW 1200Z, Sep 20 to 1200Z, Sep 21
CIS DX RTTY Contest 1200Z, Sep 20 to 1200Z, Sep 21
SEDXC 50th Anniversary Contest 1200Z-1800Z, Sep 20 and
1800Z-2400Z, Sep 21
South Carolina QSO Party 1300Z, Sep 20 to 2100Z, Sep 21
SRT HF Contest SSB 1300Z, Sep 20 to 1300Z, Sep 21
QRP Afield 1500Z, Sep 20 to 0300Z, Sep 21
Washington State Salmon Run 1600Z, Sep 20 to 0700Z, Sep 21 and
1600Z-2400Z, Sep 21
QCWA Fall QSO Party 1800Z, Sep 20 to 1800Z, Sep 21
Feld Hell Sprint 2000Z-2200Z, Sep 20
Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0100Z-0300Z, Sep 22
144 MHz Fall Sprint 1900 local - 2300 local, Sep 22
SKCC Sprint 0000Z-0200Z, Sep 24
RSGB 80m Club Sprint, CW 1900Z-2030Z, Sep 24
BCC QSO Party 1700Z-1900Z, Sep 25
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Sep 26
CQ Worldwide DX Contest, RTTY 0000Z, Sep 27 to 2400Z, Sep 28
Scandinavian Activity Contest, SSB 1200Z, Sep 27 to 1200Z, Sep 28
Texas QSO Party 1400Z, Sep 27 to 0200Z, Sep 28 and
1400Z-2000Z, Sep 28
AGCW VHF/UHF Contest 1600Z-1900Z, Sep 27 (144) and
1900Z-2100Z, Sep 27 (432)
UBA ON Contest, CW 0600Z-1000Z, Sep 28
222 MHz Fall Sprint 1900 local - 2300 local, Sep 30
October, 2008
Fall Classic Country Uncle DX Event 0000Z, Oct 1 to 2400Z, Dec 31
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 3
German Telegraphy Contest 0700Z-0959Z, Oct 3
YLRL Anniversary Party, CW 1400Z, Oct 3 to 0200Z, Oct 5
TARA PSK Rumble Contest 0000Z-2400Z, Oct 4
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 4
Oceania DX Contest, Phone 0800Z, Oct 4 to 0800Z, Oct 5
International HELL-Contest 1400Z-1600Z, Oct 4 (80m) and
0900Z-1100Z, Oct 5 (40m)
EU Autumn Sprint, SSB 1600Z-1959Z, Oct 4
California QSO Party 1600Z, Oct 4 to 2159Z, Oct 5
UBA ON Contest, 6m 0600Z-1000Z, Oct 5
RSGB 21/28 MHz Contest 0700Z-1900Z, Oct 5
432 MHz Fall Sprint 1900 local - 2300 local, Oct 8
RSGB 80m Club Sprint, CW 1900Z-2030Z, Oct 9
10-10 Int. 10-10 Day Sprint 0001Z-2359Z, Oct 10
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 10
YLRL Anniversary Party, SSB 1400Z, Oct 10 to 0200Z, Oct 12
Makrothen RTTY Contest 0000Z-0759Z, Oct 11 and
1600Z-2359Z, Oct 11 and
0800Z-1559Z, Oct 12
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 11
Oceania DX Contest, CW 0800Z, Oct 11 to 0800Z, Oct 12
EU Autumn Sprint, CW 1600Z-1959Z, Oct 11
Pennsylvania QSO Party 1600Z, Oct 11 to 0500Z, Oct 12 and
1300Z-2200Z, Oct 12
FISTS Fall Sprint 1700Z-2100Z, Oct 11
North American Sprint, RTTY 0000Z-0400Z, Oct 12
SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 0000Z-2400Z, Oct 12
UBA ON Contest, SSB 0600Z-1000Z, Oct 12
NAQCC Straight Key/Bug Sprint 0030Z-0230Z, Oct 15
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 17
ARRL EME Contest 0000Z, Oct 18 to 2359Z, Oct 19
JARTS WW RTTY Contest 0000Z, Oct 18 to 2400Z, Oct 19
ARCI Fall QSO Party 1200Z, Oct 18 to 2400Z, Oct 19
Worked All Germany Contest 1500Z, Oct 18 to 1459Z, Oct 19
Stew Perry Topband Challenge 1500Z, Oct 18 to 1500Z, Oct 19
W/VE Islands QSO Party 1600Z, Oct 18 to 2359Z, Oct 19
PODXS 070 Club 160m Great Pumpkin Sprint 2000 local, Oct 18 to 0200 local, Oct 19
Feld Hell Sprint 2000Z-2200Z, Oct 18
50 MHz Fall Sprint 2300Z, Oct 18 to 0300Z, Oct 19
Asia-Pacific Fall Sprint, CW 0000Z-0200Z, Oct 19
UBA ON Contest, 2m 0600Z-1000Z, Oct 19
Illinois QSO Party 1700Z, Oct 19 to 0100Z, Oct 20
Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0100Z-0300Z, Oct 20
ARRL School Club Roundup 1300Z, Oct 20 to 2400Z, Oct 24
SKCC Sprint 0000Z-0200Z, Oct 22
RSGB 80m Club Sprint, SSB 1900Z-2030Z, Oct 22
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 24
CQ Worldwide DX Contest, SSB 0000Z, Oct 25 to 2400Z, Oct 26
10-10 Int. Fall Contest, CW 0001Z, Oct 25 to 2359Z, Oct 26
10-10 Int. Fall Contest, Digital 0001Z, Oct 25 to 2359Z, Oct 26
Microwave Fall Sprint 0600 local - 1200 local, Oct 25
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Oct 31
November, 2008
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 1
IPARC Contest, CW 0600Z-1000Z, Nov 1 and
1400Z-1800Z, Nov 1
Ukrainian DX Contest 1200Z, Nov 1 to 1200Z, Nov 2
ARRL Sweepstakes Contest, CW 2100Z, Nov 1 to 0300Z, Nov 3
NA Collegiate ARC Championship, CW 2100Z, Nov 1 to 0300Z, Nov 3
IPARC Contest, SSB 0600Z-1000Z, Nov 2 and
1400Z-1800Z, Nov 2
High Speed Club CW Contest 0900Z-1100Z, Nov 2 and
1500Z-1700Z, Nov 2
DARC 10-Meter Digital Contest 1100Z-1700Z, Nov 2
ARS Spartan Sprint 0200Z-0400Z, Nov 4
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 7
WAE DX Contest, RTTY 0000Z, Nov 8 to 2359Z, Nov 9
JIDX Phone Contest 0700Z, Nov 8 to 1300Z, Nov 9
OK/OM DX Contest, CW 1200Z, Nov 8 to 1200Z, Nov 9
Kentucky QSO Party 1400Z, Nov 8 to 0200Z, Nov 9
CQ-WE Contest 1900Z-2300Z, Nov 8 (CW/Digital) and
0100Z-0500Z, Nov 9 (Phone) and
1900Z-2300Z, Nov 9 (Phone) and
0100Z-0500Z, Nov 10 (CW/Digital)
SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 0000Z-2400Z, Nov 9
RSGB 80m Club Sprint, SSB 1900Z-2030Z, Nov 13
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 14
ARRL EME Contest 0000Z, Nov 15 to 2359Z, Nov 16
JT Hamradio-50 Anniversary DX Contest 0000Z-2400Z, Nov 15
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 15
SARL Field Day Contest 1000Z, Nov 15 to 1000Z, Nov 16
All Austrian 160-Meter Contest 1600Z, Nov 15 to 0700Z, Nov 16
Feld Hell Sprint 1800Z-2100Z, Nov 15
RSGB 2nd 1.8 MHz Contest, CW 2100Z, Nov 15 to 0100Z, Nov 16
ARRL Sweepstakes Contest, SSB 2100Z, Nov 15 to 0300Z, Nov 17
NA Collegiate ARC Championship, SSB 2100Z, Nov 15 to 0300Z, Nov 17
EU PSK63 QSO Party 0000Z-2400Z, Nov 16
Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0200Z-0400Z, Nov 17
NAQCC Straight Key/Bug Sprint 0130Z-0330Z, Nov 20
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 21
YO International PSK31 Contest 1600Z-2200Z, Nov 21
LZ DX Contest 1200Z, Nov 22 to 1200Z, Nov 23
SKCC Sprint 0100Z-0300Z, Nov 26
RSGB 80m Club Sprint, CW 1900Z-2030Z, Nov 26
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Nov 28
CQ Worldwide DX Contest, CW 0000Z, Nov 29 to 2400Z, Nov 30
December, 2008
ARS Spartan Sprint 0200Z-0400Z, Dec 2
ARCI Topband Sprint 0000Z-0600Z, Dec 4
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 5
ARRL 160-Meter Contest 2200Z, Dec 5 to 1600Z, Dec 7
TARA RTTY Melee 0000Z-2400Z, Dec 6
Wake-Up! QRP Sprint 0400Z-0429Z, Dec 6 and
0430Z-0459Z, Dec 6 and
0500Z-0529Z, Dec 6 and
0530Z-0600Z, Dec 6
TOPS Activity Contest 1600Z, Dec 6 to 1800Z, Dec 7
NAQCC Straight Key/Bug Sprint 0130Z-0330Z, Dec 10
NA High Speed Meteor Scatter Winter Rally 0000Z, Dec 11 to 0200Z, Dec 15
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 12
ARRL 10-Meter Contest 0000Z, Dec 13 to 2400Z, Dec 14
MDXA PSK DeathMatch 0000Z, Dec 13 to 2400Z, Dec 14
SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 0000Z-2400Z, Dec 14
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Dec 19
AGB-Party Contest 2100Z-2400Z, Dec 19
Russian 160-Meter Contest 2100Z-2300Z, Dec 19
OK DX RTTY Contest 0000Z-2400Z, Dec 20
Lighthouse Christmas Lights QSO Party 0001Z, Dec 20 to 2359Z, Jan 4
Croatian CW Contest 1400Z, Dec 20 to 1400Z, Dec 21
International Naval Contest 1600Z, Dec 20 to 1559Z, Dec 21
Feld Hell Sprint 2100Z-2400Z, Dec 20
ARCI Holiday Spirits Homebrew Sprint 2000Z-2400Z, Dec 21
Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0200Z-0400Z, Dec 22
SKCC Sprint 0100Z-0300Z, Dec 24
DARC Christmas Contest 0830Z-1059Z, Dec 26
RAC Winter Contest 0000Z-2359Z, Dec 27
Stew Perry Topband Challenge 1500Z, Dec 27 to 1500Z, Dec 28
Original QRP Contest 1500Z, Dec 27 to 1500Z, Dec 28
RAEM Contest 0200Z-0959Z, Dec 28
January, 2009
SARTG New Year RTTY Contest 0800Z-1100Z, Jan 1
AGCW Happy New Year Contest 0900Z-1200Z, Jan 1
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Jan 2
ARRL RTTY Roundup 1800Z, Jan 3 to 2400Z, Jan 4
EUCW 160m Contest 2000Z-2300Z, Jan 3 and
0400Z-0700Z, Jan 4
ARS Spartan Sprint 0200Z-0400Z, Jan 6
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Jan 9
Hunting Lions in the Air Contest 0000Z, Jan 10 to 2400Z, Jan 11
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Jan 10
MI QRP January CW Contest 1200Z, Jan 10 to 2359Z, Jan 11
Midwinter Contest, CW 1400Z-2000Z, Jan 10
North American QSO Party, CW 1800Z, Jan 10 to 0600Z, Jan 11
SKCC Weekend Sprintathon 0000Z-2400Z, Jan 11
NRAU-Baltic Contest, CW 0530Z-0730Z, Jan 11
Midwinter Contest, Phone 0800Z-1400Z, Jan 11
NRAU-Baltic Contest, SSB 0800Z-1000Z, Jan 11
DARC 10-Meter Contest 0900Z-1059Z, Jan 11
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Jan 16
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Jan 17
LZ Open Contest 0400Z-1200Z, Jan 17
Hungarian DX Contest 1200Z, Jan 17 to 1159Z, Jan 18
UK DX Contest, RTTY 1200Z, Jan 17 to 1200Z, Jan 18
North American QSO Party, SSB 1800Z, Jan 17 to 0600Z, Jan 18
ARRL January VHF Sweepstakes 1900Z, Jan 17 to 0400Z, Jan 19
Run for the Bacon QRP Contest 0200Z-0400Z, Jan 19
NAQCC Straight Key/Bug Sprint 0130Z-0330Z, Jan 22
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Jan 23
CQ 160-Meter Contest, CW 2200Z, Jan 23 to 2159Z, Jan 25
REF Contest, CW 0600Z, Jan 24 to 1800Z, Jan 25
BARTG RTTY Sprint 1200Z, Jan 24 to 1200Z, Jan 25
UBA DX Contest, SSB 1300Z, Jan 24 to 1300Z, Jan 25
SPAR Winter Field Day 1700Z, Jan 24 to 1700Z, Jan 25
SKCC Sprint 0100Z-0300Z, Jan 28
NCCC Sprint 0230Z-0300Z, Jan 30
SARL Youth Day Sprint 0700Z-1100Z, Jan 31 "

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by WA3YAY on November 23, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I read this at 5AM and now I'm getting very sleepy
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by 5R8GQ on November 23, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
N2KFC:
"Contests Paranoia!!!"
"This is quotation of Contests List done by WA7BNM"
<SNIP>

Yessirree!
Those dang 2-3 hour CW-QRP & PSK31 Sprints make ALL the bands TOTALLY USELESS! Shameful, isn't it? Especially with the outstanding propagation these days!

 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by NN3W on November 24, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Not to mention the "Hunting Lions in the Air Contest" and the "Kentucky QSO Party"

Wall to wall QRM caused by the KY QSO party - which received 38 logs from the 2007 contest.
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 24, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Big or Small Contest,World or Local Contest,Long or Short Contest...this does not matter...50-60 Contest "Bullies" can knock down SSB Portion of 20 meters Band with their:CQ Contest,CQ Contest,CQ Contest!!!

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by NN3W on November 24, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I think at this point, you need to look up the word "paranoid" in the dictionary.

It fits you. To a tee.

 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 24, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Contest "per say" is not a problem,just too many of them !!!

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by NV9X on November 25, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I,m tired.
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K1OU on November 28, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
A couple of things..

Per N2KFC..

"Big or Small Contest,World or Local Contest,Long or Short Contest...this does not matter...50-60 Contest "Bullies" can knock down SSB Portion of 20 meters Band with their:CQ Contest,CQ Contest,CQ Contest!!!"

Help me understand how old men talking about gallbladders, working England for the millionth time just to "say hello", making racist comments about political candidates, or talking about their computers is a more efficient use of spectrum? Or more enjoyable to which to listen?

How about this....instead of contesters being segregated to certain times and parts of the band, lets make the gallbladder/DX freak/racist/computer nerd stay in certain areas of the band?


Makes about as much sense, doesn't it?


Also, you would have more credibility if you knew the expression "per se".
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 29, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
K1OU Wrote:"Help me understand how old men talking about gallbladders, working England for the millionth time just to "say hello", making racist comments about political candidates, or talking about their computers is a more efficient use of spectrum? Or more enjoyable to which to listen? "

Well...it is Freedom of Speech !!!

"Per say" or "Persay" is the Urban Slang version of "Per se".

Dividing Bands in The Contest time for Contest use and Non-contest use is the very good idea !!!I agree with you.

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K1OU on November 30, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
And "CQ Contest" is also freedom of speech.

 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 30, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
K1OU Wrote:"And "CQ Contest" is also freedom of speech." -yes,but they do not operate in the "vacuum",they have to follow The Rules of Radiocommunication,specially The Fundamental Law of Radiocommunication-FREQUENCY in USE !!!-I am sure that you agree with me...

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K1OU on November 30, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
By the same token, explain to me why it is okay for somebody to maliciously interfere with a contester who has held a frequency?

Also, I do some casual contesting, and I for one always ask if a frequency is in use before I start CQ'ing.

For you to paint such broad brushstrokes about every contester is myopic at best, foolish at worst. Then again, it is probably the only way you can support such a flimsy argument.

In closing, I'd ask you to get on 40 meter sideband for a chat sometime to see for yourself, but I see that you are only a Tech Plus who hasn't even bothered to upgrade.


Cheers!

 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 30, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
K10U Wrote:"In closing, I'd ask you to get on 40 meter sideband for a chat sometime to see for yourself, but I see that you are only a Tech Plus who hasn't even bothered to upgrade"

Wow,what a non-sense...I am Ham Radio Operator for over 40Yrs,and I have all proper PERMITS I need !!!
I am specializing in 144MHz weak Signals and 15Mtrs DX-ing...

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K1OU on November 30, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Well, is it true that you are only a Tech Plus in the states? By the defensive answer, obviously yes!

My father had his Technician license for forty-two years before he upgraded. You can too!
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 30, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
K1OU Wrote:"Well, is it true that you are only a Tech Plus in the states? By the defensive answer, obviously yes!

My father had his Technician license for forty-two years before he upgraded. You can too! "

Well,what a non-sense,again!!!
I have 3 PERMITS in 3 Different countries:SP2GGZ ,N2KFC and YB1AQV,with my set of permits I can operate in almost every country in THe World !!! Even,I can give up my USA Permit and I still can operate in USA using my other Permits !!!
Get real !!!

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K1OU on November 30, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Calm down, silly man.

You have a Tech Plus license in the states, correct? A simple yes or no will suffice.

You can do it, big guy!
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K1OU on November 30, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Per N2KFC...

"50-60 Contest "Bullies" can knock down SSB Portion of 20 meters Band with their:CQ Contest,CQ Contest,CQ Contest!!!"

And when you are operating in the US, this affects you how? You're a Tech Plus, correct?
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on November 30, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
To K1OU...get real...take it easy...I am living in and operating from different Countries...I am not USA Citizen...Yes,when I am operating from The South Pacific,I have constant problems with Contesters who do not respect "Frequency in Use"...

So,get real...take your Prozac and relax!!!

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K1OU on December 1, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
All I asked was if you were a Tech Plus in the US. Then, you suggested that I take my Prozac.

If that is your response to simple question, I feel sorry for you. And judging by your responses to others in this thread, it's obvious that you can't be helped.

Let's try this one more time....in the US, you have Tech Plus privileges, correct?
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on December 1, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
To K1OU...you are hopeless case...it is not up to you to decide who can and who can not operate in USA...FCC does, according to International Agreements btw Governments !!! It is so simple but you can not get this !!!

Maybe you need to double your PROZAC dose ???

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by KO4NX on December 1, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
This is the second time I have read the article, as I believe it was posted on a PVRC website sometime ago. I believe there is a lot to be learned from this post if you are serious about contesting. What I found most interesting about the article was some of the same tips and strategies were covered during a “Flight Physiology” course I took in flight school many years ago.

These days, I almost never turn on the station unless it’s for a contest. Of course, if I install a new antenna, or need to check an interface, I may work a few contacts during the week to prepare me for the weekend battle. The only exception is 160 Meter DX, which suites me nicely, because I like to stay up late at night!

Unfortunately I missed CQWW last weekend, but plan on making up for it during the 160 Meter contest coming up. I hope to hear all of you there, except for our good friend N2KFC, whom should have the all the Novice and Technician bands free and clear to use as he sees fit!


73

Rich, AJ3G
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K1OU on December 1, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
N2KFC...

A simple yes or no will suffice...

You have Tech Plus operating privileges in the US, correct?
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on December 2, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
To K1OU...you are hopeless case...this is Article abt Contesting not Ham Radio Permits !!! We were discussing Ham Radio Permits many times on EHAM,QRZ.com and other blogs.So stick to the subject of Contesting !!! But you just avoiding the fact ,that Contests on almost every Weekend are big problem on Ham Radio Bands !!!
I am Ham Radio Operator for over 40 Yrs,I am a DX Station myself when I am operating from The South Pacific,so I know Contest Problems very well,"first hand".I have all proper Permits,I have Polish First Class Permit for over 40 Yrs,I have Indonesian First Class Permit...I did over 100000 QSO's over the 40 Yrs, over 20000 SSB DX QSO's from YB1...
So,stick to the Subject of Contesting !!!

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on December 2, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
To K1OU...you are hopeless case...for Contest "Bullies" like you,Contesting is like a "Religion",and you are not tolerant at all,but other Hams Operators like different Ham Radio Activities,they have different Ham Radio "Religion"...but there a Hope !!!Read sometimes The Holly Book of KORAN,specially Koran Book 109...


The Disbelievers
In the name of Allah, the Beneficent, the Merciful.

[109.1] Say: O unbelievers!
[109.2] I do not serve that which you serve,
[109.3] Nor do you serve Him Whom I serve:
[109.4] Nor am I going to serve that which you serve,
[109.5] Nor are you going to serve Him Whom I serve:
[109.6] You shall have your religion and I shall have my religion.

I hope ,that after reading this,you will start to think,you become more TOLERANT in your Hobby and your Live !!!
There always is Hope...specially bcs your new President,Barak Obama knows Holly Book of Koran very well...

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on December 2, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
To K1OU...you are hopeless case...Poland is CEPT Agreement Member,operators from CEPT Countries do not need any special Permit to operate Ham Radiostation in USA !!!Just have to use in USA, USA Prefix/his Home Country CALL...Get real!!!

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by KO4NX on December 2, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
N2KFC you tell K10U to “So, stick to the Subject of Contesting !!!”

Then have the nerve to spew this nonsense on the same day:

“The Disbelievers
In the name of Allah, the Beneficent, the Merciful.

[109.1] Say: O unbelievers!
[109.2] I do not serve that which you serve,
[109.3] Nor do you serve Him Whom I serve:
[109.4] Nor am I going to serve that which you serve,
[109.5] Nor are you going to serve Him Whom I serve:
[109.6] You shall have your religion and I shall have my religion.

I hope ,that after reading this,you will start to think,you become more TOLERANT in your Hobby and your Live !!!
There always is Hope...specially bcs your new President,Barak Obama knows Holly Book of Koran very well...”


You are talking out both sides of your mouth, and no one likes a hypocrite. Hasn’t anyone ever told you, in your self proclaimed long history of being an amateur radio operator, that it’s impolite to speak about religion and politics when you know there is an international audience?

You wonder why all these people are interested in contesting, well you are making a great case for it, because they don’t want to listen to garbage like this on the air!



73


Rich, AJ3G
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K1OU on December 2, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
N2KFC,

It's sad and pathetic that you can't answer a simple yes or no question, such as whether or not you have Tech Plus privileges in the US.

It's amazing that you even have a license at all.
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on December 2, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
To K1OU...you are hopeless case...you are so "bitter" person...relax...THINK POSITIVE ... PEACE ...


73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,

 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on December 2, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
To AJ3G...

Hello Rich,

I can understand that you are shock and "knock down" by Peacefull words of Holly Book of Koran...this will take some time before you fully understand power of The Holly Book of Koran...get one,and read..PEACE...

By the way ,we are not on the Air...this is just internet Blog !!!

73! Peace...
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K1OU on December 2, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
John,

Show me where I am bitter? I asked a simple question, several times, and you can't answer it because you perceive that it will shred your credibility, when in fact the reality is, you have none.

Then, you start attempt to beat me over the head with the Quran, a book of peace, only after you imply that I need Prozac.

Let's see. I ask a question, you won't answer, imply that I am crazy, and attempt to witness me with a book about which you obviously know nothing. On top of that, you make a cheap attempt to insult Barack Obama, when you can't even acknowledge what a white, so-called Christiam has done for our country for the last eight years.

Grow up.

By the way, yes or no, you have Tech Plus privileges in the US, correct?
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on December 2, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
K1OU Wrote:"Let's see. I ask a question, you won't answer, imply that I am crazy, and attempt to witness me with a book about which you obviously know nothing. On top of that, you make a cheap attempt to insult Barack Obama, when you can't even acknowledge what a white, so-called Christiam has done for our country for the last eight years. "

First I do not Insult President Barak Obama !!!I think that this is VERY POSITIVE ,that first time in the history of USA,USA President knows Koran very well !!!
I share with President Obama very special "link",Beauitiful Indonesia is our "Adopted Fatherland".I hope that one day I can meet President Obama in person,in USA or in Indonesia,so we can have a nice chat in Bahasa Indinesia-Indonesian Launguage.
I know very well his neighborhood in Jakarta,where he was living and going to School.I respect Mr Obama very much,hey!He is my Indonesian Brother !!!I know Indonesia very well,I spent over 3 yrs in Indo so far...Indonesian People are very nice...

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on December 2, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
To K1OU...I know Holly Book of Koran very well,I know Muslim Religion very well,Indonesia is the biggest Muslim Country in The World.I travel a lot,mostly to Asia:Japan, Taiwan, S.Korea and Indonesia.I like Asia very much,specially Japan,I am former Judo Fighter...Japan is fascinating Country !!!

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K7GLM on December 3, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Enough already. You're both worse than a couple of hardheads that QRM each other by tuning up for minutes on end.

BTW John, I think you probably mean Holy book of Koran, not Holly book. Unless you're referring to some mystic Muslim guide book on Christmas decorating.


For me, I like to DX, I like to Contest lightly. I don't have the antenna farm to be a contender, nor am I going to punish myself through losing sleep. Heck, sometimes I'll drop a contest for several hours just to spend time with my family. Go figure!

When there is a contest that I'm not working, it's just another challenge to work through and another way to improve my skills as an operator. I may not be able to copy CW at 40 WPM for a rag chew, but I can sit on the sidelines and practice while listening to a contester work. Sort of a "non-video" game for a radio head.

Now, get off the computer and go work some DX!
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on December 3, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
K7GLM Wrote :"BTW John, I think you probably mean Holy book of Koran, not Holly book. Unless you're referring to some mystic Muslim guide book on Christmas decorating."

Yes you are right...Holly is the urban slang version of Holy book...in common use...

73!Good DX-ing !
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by KO4NX on December 3, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
N2KFC Said: "Yes you are right...Holly is the urban slang version of Holy book...in common use... "

Your joking right???

Rich, AJ3G
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by N2KFC on December 4, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
To Rich, AJ3G ...

Rich ,go to GOOGLE and do search on: Holly book, Holly Koran, Holly Bible...Term "Holly" is in commom use...

73!
John,SP2GGZ,N2KFC,YB1AQV,
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by K7GLM on December 4, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
Wow. Ok. If Google says it's OK and appropriate, it must be OK. It does surprise me at some level that the Muslim community would tolerate any "slang" related references to the holy tome, given the general reaction to other secular influences.

Having wandered too far off topic, my correction stands corrected. You did mean Holly Koran after all.
 
RE: A Sleep Strategy for DX Contesting  
by KO4NX on December 6, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
I would have never thought that to be an acceptable slang for Holy.

Oh well, live and learn! Now back to the 160 Meter contest!


73

AJ3G
 
HAVE A HOLLY JOLLY CHRISTMAS  
by PLANKEYE on December 7, 2008 Mail this to a friend!
One other article, that is still burning here on E-ham, is based on Homeland Security.

Enough said! You fellers can figure it out on your own.

Callsigns are just that, Callsigns.

Merry Christmas and God Bless!!




PLANKEYE


 
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