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[Articles Home]  [Add Article]  

Radio Programs on Ham Radio!

Michael Schonborn (G7IDJ) on February 18, 2009
View comments about this article!

I work for a small radio station in the UK broadcasting via satellite to Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. The station is meant to be a niche broadcaster catering for smaller organizations and interests.

Now since Amateur Radio is mostly but not all about audio I am thinking in the back of my mind that the media lends itself to raise the interest especially of Amateur Radio and to try to get more people active within the hobby.

I once tried out a talk about shortwave radio by taking trusted old FRG-7 in the studio and covered the different bands and talked about the different modes of propagation and types of modulation. It worked reasonably well and sounded ok on the program but it was just an attempt to see whether it would trigger responses from listeners.

Writing all this I am thinking of past eHam articles where ham radio is considered to be a dying hobby and that one-day we may struggle to find fellow hams to talk to or communicate with.

Here in the UK this is certainly the case on the bands especially the higher frequencies on VHF and UHF are virtually dead and there is but little activity and that all despite a great influx of newcomers by lowering the entry criteria.

Special interests like ATV, EME, data and other activities flare up every now and then but then they ebb away and the modes return to low levels of activity.

May be - just may be trying to push HAM radio a bit more in the public spotlight would widen the appeal and ensure the survival of the hobby into the next generation and also give us potentially a stronger voice to protect our spectrum from nasty invasions like PLT etc.

The idea is and I may be able to wing it to get 'promotional' programs on Amateur radio on air broadcasted via Eurobird 9 and obviously for free since I work for the station. If there is a good response I am sure that it may be possible to get a permanent slot.

There are a few questions to the community:
1. Do you think it is a good idea to have a regular slot on Amateur Radio on a Satellite Radio Station? Would you be interested to listen to that?

2. Do you think newcomers would be 'enticed' to the hobby through public broadcasts?

3. Is it possible to maintain the interest on this for extended periods of time?
i.e. if there would be a weekly slot - is there enough to talk about for 30 minutes or even 60 minutes a week for a whole year?

I am not sure whether it would work but comments from fellow hams would be most welcome in support of this as well as critical comments.

The next point would be for club talks and possibly even teaching sessions suitable in an audio only format would be welcome to be placed on air - that is should the consensus be that this may be a good idea.

Thanks for the interest to this little article.

Member Comments:
This article has expired. No more comments may be added.
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by KC8VWM on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I think ham radio promotion should start off simple.

Just like any marketing approach.

Develop one single idea that everyone collectively agrees on then you carry out the advertising strategy.

First you attach the bait.

Second you throw out the line.

Third you hook 'em in.

I know that approach is incredibly simplified however it's the bread and butter behind any marketing or promotion campaign.

73 de Charles - KC8VWM

"Wall Street - Buisnessman Of The Year - 2003"
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by N2UGB on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I admire your enthusiasm.

I remember "technical" programs on a few international SWBC stations. Any hams-to-be were tuning in to those transmissions.

Could you talk the BBC foreign service into presenting a generalized tech program that included Amateur radio subjects? It would be streaming internet audio and SWBC to developing nations.

Frankly, I don't think it would fly,
But you could give it a try

Good luck
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by N0UY on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I say "Give it a go". If the content of the broadcast has the ability to connect with people on a personal basis it should become quite popular I would think. Just think how many everyday things to us hams are easily understood because of our exposure to the hobby where someone who is not, the concept is beyond them.

Take the change over here in the United States to digital TV. Many are confused about the antenna requirements, the digital to analog converters, and etc. Just talking to a few of them and helping them with the change has really enlighten them to something they have never been exposed to up until now.

After all, there is always someone on the radio giving advice about every other aspect of our lives. Why not Ham Radio subject matter. I wish you the best of luck with the program should you decide to do it. Maybe others can help you by making suggestions to the content of these broadcasts but most of the burden will fall upon you most likely.

Best Wishes Ray
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by KF4HR on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I also admire your enthusiasm, but I question whether your efforts would have much effect on the amateur radio population. Upon hearing such a radio broadcast, most people would more than likely be looking for solid advantages to become a licensed amateur and the expenses they would incur. With inexpensive cell phone and internet communications being what they are, and those technologies improving faster than amateur radio technology, justification to become licensed and equipped would probably prove to be too difficult for most people. The technically minded will be drawn to such broadcasts, and that's were you may influence a few people, but they will be making those same technology comparisons as well.

Would I tune in to such a broadcast? If the programming format was kept interesting, probably.

As the saying goes, nothing ventured, nothing gained. Give it a shot and good luck.

KF4HR



 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by WA3SKN on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
This sounds like a good idea, but you will have to remain focused!
A general discussion of amateur radio will work for a broadcast, but specific info differs for each country. Licensing and rules vary by country... the requirements here in the US differ from Europe, or the Mideast, or each country in Africa for that matter.
Keep that in mind when developing your show and you should be OK!

-Mike.
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by WA3SKN on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
This sounds like a good idea, but you will have to remain focused!
A general discussion of amateur radio will work for a broadcast, but specific info differs for each country. Licensing and rules vary by country... the requirements here in the US differ from Europe, or the Mideast, or each country in Africa for that matter.
Keep that in mind when developing your show and you should be OK!

-Mike.
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by K0BG on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Amateur radio has a lot of facets. More in fact, than most hobbies. It is also faddish in that new ideas gain a big following when they're first introduced, and then they wane to a rather steady level. Two meter FM activity, SSTV, Echolink, EME, satellite work, and a few others have already waned, or will, given enough time. For example, except for 6 meters, my VHF activity has all but ceased. Yes, I'm into mobile operation as I've sort of found my level as it were.

The point here is, if you want to peak someone's interest, you have to pick a facet that's, well, faddish. That seems to be SDR and digital modes at the moment. However, I'm of the opinion that amateur radio has become too esoteric for common man. However, if we could convince the teenage segment that the melodic sound of a good CW fist is the latest in fad music, we might have something. But alas, that too is waning.

Your idea is both novel and unique, and I wish you luck.

Alan, KBG
www.k0bg.com
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by AI4WN on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!

Just a bloody good idea!!!! Go for it!!!! The HAM population should take every means of promotion available. Not just from the disaster-disaster-disaster promotions but for all aspects of this wonderful hobby.

Local HAM clubs need to take on the local press. Invite the press, both print and broadcast
representatives, to your meetings and events. Increase the circulation of your club's monthly newsletter. Be sure to publish the VEC testing sessions in your area.

HAM radio is a great way to 'travel' and 'meet new friends' in this 2009 economy without burning any gas.

Using radio to promote radio is just a darn good idea!!!

73 Tedd
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by KC0RBX on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
It is already being done. Here, in my local, a local AM broadcast station is running advertisements for ARES and Ham radio produced by the ARRL.
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by W9WHE-II on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
With radical liberal democrats in control of the US government and pushing the so-called "fairness doctrine", perhaps ham radio can get equal treatment and time. Remember, now that we have his majesty, the Messiah, Barack Hussein Obama, in charge of the socialist nanny-state, everything will change here in the USSA (United Socialist States of America).
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by W9WHE-II on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
AI4WN writes:

"Local HAM clubs need to take on the local press. Invite the press, both print and broadcast
representatives, to your meetings and events"

Well, just make sure your membership showers, shaves and limits attendees to ONE HT per bloated beltline!
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by AB7E on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I don't have anything against your proposal, but I'm curious why you think it will do much good. You already gave examples where some of the more appealing aspects (to youth and newcomers) of ham radio weren't even retaining the interests of existing hams ... presumably people who had already been drawn to the hobby for reasons more compelling than exposure to an airwaves pep talk.

I really enjoy ham radio, spend a lot of money on it, and will stay with it until I die. But I don't pretend my reasons for doing so will have any relevance to anyone not already in the hobby. To those who disagree with me, I'll point to the zillion other forum postings over the last few years that discuss this same topic ... i.e., the need for publicity and awareness programs to bring in new members. How's that been working for you folks? Hint: browse through the pictures taken at Dayton, or the ones published in QST or RadComm, or the ones you see accompanying the biographies on QRZ.com.

73,
Dave AB7E

 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by K5END on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
"Upon hearing such a radio broadcast, most people would more than likely be looking for solid advantages to become a licensed amateur and the expenses they would incur. "

Which is exactly how the message should come across.

There are many advantages to Amateur Radio. A battery, a radio smaller than a cigar box, a wire antenna and some "know how" are all I need to talk across the world, independently of civil or other telecom infrastructure.

"Cell phones and Amateur Radio" is not an "apples-and-oranges comparison."

It is an "apples-and-volkswagen" comparison, and this should be made very clear.

Yes, I say, "The Show Must Go On." Do it. If it can be heard in Texas, I will listen, and will encourage others to do so.

Thank you for doing this service. Ignore the naysayers.

"You will always miss 100% of the shots you do not take" (not sure who said that, but it is a quote attributable to someone. Maybe you can discuss that on your programming.)
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by K5UJ on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Around 9 or 10 years ago there was a 1 hour syndicated call-in program devoted to ham radio here in the U.S. It was carried by 20 or 30 medium wave AM stations around the country and was broadcast out of Phoenix every Sunday afternoon. The hosts were two hams and if I remember correctly, the show was called CQ Ham Radio or something like that. It lasted a year or so.

Gradually stations pulled the plug on it (I think it was mainly on small stations to begin with) and here's why in my opinion. The hosts did some things that were lame--they came back from every station break calling CQ, sort of like they were on a ham station. Cute maybe once, but several times each show and it got old fast, plus the general public probably didn't get it. Which brings up the main problem--the show was done in a way that made it understandable to hams, but hams were probably a tiny percentage of the audience. The hosts also didn't sound like professional radio personalities. The whole thing seemed dull and flat and boring. The did have guests such as Wayne Green, who always livens things up but with ham radio as the content topic, it is pretty hard to keep listeners so stations can generate revenue.

Perhaps the hosts tried to make radio interesting and cool to the public; I can't remember, and if it had been about radio in general, ham and broadcast for example, and its history and the thrill and magic of it all, it might have gone somewhere because they might have captured the imagination of a non-ham listener.

Hams don't need a broadcast show just for them. They can turn on their ham rigs and operate and have a qso talking about ham radio with another ham for that.

So, it flopped. Why am I writing all this? To help you avoid doing what they did.
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by KE0VH on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
As both a broadcast engineer and "DJ" for many years, having a local talk show about amateur radio might appeal to many in a local area, you could even get guests from different clubs and organizations to fill in content and subjects, especially around some of the larger markets.. Some smaller stations would actually be glad to maybe have some content to fill time, so if one were interested, it might be a viable possibility. It could be a public service filler type show too.

Of course, you could always set up an internet station. As far as reaching cars and general populace though, you might end up having to pay for time on air , but an interesting idea.

73'
de KEVH
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by WA8MEA on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I was one of several over the past three decades to attempt to place a ham radio program on our domestic shortwave stations.

We were never able to get the sponsorship needed for these programs. Seems that Icom, Yaesu, Kenwood, MFJ and many others were never interested. This also happened to many other hams who attempted this venture.
Ironically, the ads were MUCH less expensive than the smallest CQ or QST ad. Some as low as $10 a spot!

We did get a free gratis program for a while on World Harvest Radio and their various stations....thanks to the fact that the Chief Engineer was a ham. However, with the CE going to greener pastures, that situation soon changed.

73, Bill- WA8MEA
http://HamRadioFun.com
tinytenna@hotmail.com
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by AI2IA on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I congratulate you on your enthusiasm and dynamic approach to further amateur radio for the future generations. I believe that you can succeed.

If you give the listeners subjects such as radio wave propagation, the mysteries of sunspots, the usefulness of emcomm, the history of radio replete with amateur contributors to its progress, and the world-wide promotion of goodwill and understanding, and you pepper it with stories about these subjects and not merely dry scientific explanations, you can indeed promote the interest.

Good planning and preparation along with friendly and cooperative fellow hams can make your enthusiasm for ham radio quite contagious. I wish you the very best of luck in this endeavor! - AI2IA
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by VE6TL on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Sorry for the ignorance, but I've never tried satellite radio. My guess is that I'm probably not the only one who doesn't have a clue about it - at least I hope not. Can you fill us in on what sort of equipment is needed to receive it? What sort of economic model do you need to support the programming?


Thanks.

Jerry VE6CNU
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by WY3X on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
There used to be one on C-band. I haven't had a big dish in almost two years, so I don't know if it's still there or not. I don't remember the details. I only listened to it twice in 10 years. It would be nice to have one on Ku-band MPEG-2/FTA. Maybe T5/IA-5/G-25 or whatever it's known as these days (97 degrees west orbital slot). It seems like everyone looking for a cheap way to broadcast free programming is using that sat. -KR4WM
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by G0GQK on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Why not ? I don't think that satellite broadcasting is popular, as you know there are very few people with satellite radio's, in fact in Britain only about 18% have a DAB radio, and I still believe stereo FM is far and away the best.

Perhaps a better method would be internet broadcasts and it would need to be wider than just telling people how wonderful ham radio is because you can talk to people in far off lands. They can do that using a phone.

Even having short clips of a radio contact is boring to listen to for more than a couple of minutes, and in today's world it has to involve a computer. In the time that the big three sold perhaps half a million tranceivers, the computer manufacturers have sold a hundred million PC's

Stories about the history of amateur radio would be interesting, the early days, modified WW2 equipment in the US and Russia, Japanese designers talking about their products, people in far off places etc. Stories would need to be about amateurs all over the world, not just the US and Britain

G0GQK
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by WI7B on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!



I'LL ANSWER DIRECTLY YOUR QUESTIONS.

1. Do you think it is a good idea to have a regular slot on Amateur Radio on a Satellite Radio Station?

YES.

Would you be interested to listen to that?

IF IT WERE INTERESTING, I WOULD. HUMAN INTEREST STORIES WITH TECHNICAL SUAVY. AMATUER RADIO IS DIFFERENT IN EACH OF THE THREE REGIONS, AND IN EVERY COUNTRY THERE ARE VARIATIONS ON ITS REGULATION, PRACTICE, AND PRIMARY USAGES.

MY THOUGHT IS FOR AN INTERNATIONAL AUDIENCE, TO GO INTO DEPTH OF THE LIFE OF HAMS IN WACH COUNTRY OR REIGON, WITH THE UNIQUENESS OF RADIO TO THAT COUNTRY AND TO THEM.

THE ANTITHESIS OF THIS PERSPECTIVE IS MAKING THE SHOW LIKE A "QST OF THE AIR". tHEAT WOLD BE A DEATH-KNELL. YOU EMCOOM STORIES OF JOE HAM IN SOUTH CAROLINA AND HIS GO-KIT. THAT MIGHT BE ONE STORY ABOUT THE US, BUT THAT'S IT...ONE STORY.

2. Do you think newcomers would be 'enticed' to the hobby through public broadcasts?

FIRST, I THINK IT SHOULD BE ENTERTAINING.

3. Is it possible to maintain the interest on this for extended periods of time?
(i.e. if there would be a weekly slot - is there enough to talk about for 30 minutes or even 60 minutes a week for a whole year?)

30 MINUTES/WEEK MAXIMUM.


73,

---* KEN







 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by PHANTOMFIXER on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Arnie Corvo Radio Havana kind of does this.I don't know how many people listen but I enjoy his program.Although I'm "just" a SWL I enjoy hearing whats going on in the world of ham radio and following the newest developments.Give it shot.I'll be waiting to see or hear about your new endeavor.
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by G3LBS on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I listen to the Havana program and enjoy it, so I would definitely listen to your program. Excellent idea go for it. If you want any help with contributions contact me qrz.com G3LBS or gcleeton@hotmail.com
Gil
W2/G3LBS Buffalo NY
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by W4HLN on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
IN SIRIUS TROUBLE
SATELLITE RADIO FIRM HEADED FOR BANKRUPTCY FILING.

http://www.nypost.com/seven/02112009/business/in_sirius_trouble_154457.htm


If you have never tried Satellite Radio you had better hurry!
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by AD7WN on February 18, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
An intriguing idea Michael. From a marketing standpoint I haven't a clue if it will be effective. I expect the only way to find out is to give it a go and see what the response is.

Thanks for the article and good luck, 73 de John AD7WN
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by KB0TXC on February 19, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
W4HLN Wrote:

If you have never tried Satellite Radio you had better hurry!

KB0TXC wrote:

Don't worry...I am sure that the risen messiah, his lordship Obama will make the determination that XM/Sirius is "too big to let fail", and will be given <billions> of taxpayer money so that Howard Stern can continue to make his thousand dollars a minute...

Joe KB0TXC
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by N7YA on February 19, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Pssst, just a side note, nobody is on the "Obama is god" kick except the hard right neocons.

To the rest of us, he is just another politician. The big story was the fact that hes black and got elected...and that you guys got your arses handed to you.

 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by N0UY on February 19, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
N7YA is right on. Leave the crap for another forum somewhere else.
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by KC5HMC on February 19, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Great idea! I would like to have a station that would have a spot for ham/technical stuff.
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by WW5AA on February 19, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
"2. Do you think newcomers would be 'enticed' to the hobby through public broadcasts?"

Only if the "new comers are old folks" A survey of the 18-25 year olds around here indicates that almost none of them listens to commercial radio, They down load music and games from the internet and listen to their IPods or smart phones. One 19 year old I talked too gets his news from the video sites. High school graduate that can't read at that level...mercy

73 de Lindy

 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by K4RAF on February 19, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
You might draw an audience if the hobby was actually close to "cutting edge" however, look around lately...?

The only possible "draw" would be those who feel guilty about taking sleep aids & seek a "natural alternative"...

QSL?
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by AB7E on February 19, 2009 Mail this to a friend!

I think a lot of comments here are missing the point. It's not really whether we who are already interested in ham radio would enjoy a radio show on ham radio topics (although that was one indeed of the author's questions). The real question is whether people from outside the hobby would be drawn into it via such a show. I strongly doubt that they would. Consider these hobbies, some of which are a bit obscure but none less so than ham radio:

Fishing, rock collecting, skeet (shooting), stamp collecting, quilting, dog grooming/showing, bird watching, hiking, astronomy, painting, weaving, stained glass making, woodcarving, pottery making, celebrity sighting, bottle collecting, insect collecting, photography, coin collecting, gardening, cooking, automobile restoration, knitting, calligraphy, magic tricks, kite making, etc.

If you were not already inclined toward one of those hobbies, what is the probability that a radio show would entice you to jump in? I suspect quite low. You might find the show curious or even mildly interesting, but I sincerely doubt it would influence you to actively participate ... especially if you were required to pass a test for the privilege.

73,
Dave AB7E
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by WI7B on February 19, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
AB7E,

I hear your dogs barking, but its not the comments its what the author of the article asked. He wants to know if WE would listen.73,

---* Ken
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by KG6DNY on February 19, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Upon reading this article, and mulling it over in my mind, I'd like some sort of radio, or
even TV program dealing with ham radio, as well as other radio hobbies like shortwave and
scanner listening, FRS/GMRS/CB, even de-mystifying common radio appliances people use, like
Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. It should be augmented with a website that can go into more graphic
detail, visuals & web links that can't be shown on the radio, and possibly allow users to
download or stream the program to their computer or cellphone. I considered to pitch this
idea to the TV industry, perhaps for a cable channel, like G4/TechTV... a ham radio program
hosted by maybe Joe Walsh (most people should know who he is) and show various aspects of
amateur radio on each program. HF, VHF, ATV, contesting, moonbounce, boatanchors (a topic
familiar to Joe) etc, etc. Show each end of the communication if possible (yeah I know...
have to pay 2 camera crews) and do it in a way that would pique the curiosity of the
tech-savvy viewer. Try to show it from a human interest point of view, need to show the
subjects using the radios more than the hardware. Devote one program to license testing and
preparation. Maybe present a few questions from the Technician Exam and give the answers
after the commercial break. I'd certainly watch this program, and would invite my friends
who want to know more about my ham radio hobby to watch it too.


Pros: Positive publicity for ham radio. Need to present it as a modern, vibrant and
enriching experience. Promote ham radio as an interactive hobby.

Cons: Need to keep info fresh, relevant, and not too technical. Exercise patience and try
not to cram too much info in each segment.

I like all the other answers here on this forum, I'd thought I'd share my ideas here, too.

73,
Lynn KG6DNY
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by KB9JJA on February 19, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I think you have a good idea, but have chosen the wrong format. Today many people do not listen to radio as broadcast, or TV for that matter. It is recorded for playback at a convenient time. Take this idea and put it on utube and as a podcast and make it downloadable from a web page. THen you would have something. You think ham radio is dying (I do not), but take a look at TV and Broadcast radio, and even newspapers, there is a dying area. It all has to do with convenience, and content.

73 de KB9JJA/Dale
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by AB7E on February 19, 2009 Mail this to a friend!

To WI7B:

That was my point. I addressed my posting to those who commented, and who said "they" would listen ... as if that made any difference to the author's concern about the future of ham radio. It doesn't.

And you may want to reread the article, particularly these items (quoted from the article):

"May be - just may be trying to push HAM radio a bit more in the public spotlight would widen the appeal and ensure the survival of the hobby into the next generation"

"2. Do you think newcomers would be 'enticed' to the hobby through public broadcasts? "

Clearly the author is wondering, at least in part, whether a radio show will recruit newcomers to the hobby. My contention is that it will not.

73,
Dave AB7E
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by NA4IT on February 19, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I think it would be good. However, the reporter actually needs to be a non-ham, without political agendas, who would take the time and research all the aspects of ham radio, the hobby, DXing, EMCOMM, etc. and give an unbiased view point. Too many stories are written about amateur radio and either 1) are written by hams blowing their own trumpet (lookie what we did) or 2) a non-ham reporter that thinks ham is just another CB.

de NA4IT
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by K9WJL on February 19, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I think a better venue might be on the Discovery Channel or the Novs Science Now show or something like that. I think you'd be able to capture the people are interested in Science and Astronomy, as well as Geography.
You might show them how amazing it is to "talk" around the planet with the power equal to the consumption of a christmas tree light bulb. Then take that into propagation and how that works.
I think the Kids that are smart and into the sciences and are bored with their video games might gain some interest.
I would also think that a good venue would be in Science Class in school, where there's lots of topic IIRC, but little practical application. Maybe go on to explain that all the neat little "wireless" gadgets that they can't live without are merely variations of radio.
73,
Bill K9WJL
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by KG4CLD on February 19, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I like the idea of amateur radio programs that shows participants engaged in building antennas, or some kind of interesting projects. Maybe even an antique radio restoration program. (hint hint!)

Anyone ever watch a program called 'Robot Wars?' People from all over the U.S. and the U.K. building robots and then competing against each other for prizes. Of course the robots got bashed up and banged around, but those involved and those viewing the program, learned quite a bit about servo-motors, receivers and transmitters, metal and plastic fabrications, power cells and applications, as well as, wireless CCD's(cameras), infared direction finding circuits and sonic wave proximity detectors.

Just think of the audience you could gain if the Amateur programming was made to be as interesting.

Perhaps someone could donate a Yaesu FT-817, or an Icom IC-703, to the host of "SURVIVOR MAN" with a few different types of portable antenna systems. You could watch him hang from a tree high in the Amazon, with a make-shift dipole draped over the canopy of surrounding trees, and record him making contacts all over the world while squirrel monkeys are throwing bananas at him and a anaconda nipping at his butt.
-OR-
perhaps different groups of 'Hams' finding junk electronic parts from yards sales or flea market and making radio equipment that can really communicate.

You could call the show, "RADIO SURVIVOR" or "THE HAM GUY!"
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by W0FEN on February 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I am a Chief Engineer at an NPR FM station in a major market(Kansas City, USA). I know that it would be extremely difficult to get a weekly radio on this station. In smaller markets it might be easier. I would love to hear a program like this. Is it available as a FTP download?
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by W7NWH on February 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Broadcast radio would be awesome, so would internet pod casting, for video - HULU would be ideal and Youtube is a good start for the average ham.

Now onto cable/DSS and broadcast - my frustration.

TV equals money - even a minimal crew to do anything broadcast worthy is in the neigborhood of $30K USD an hour for broadcast cable or DSS. And that's like dirt cheap, now multiply that times 13 shows.

I make broadcast programming for Spike, Fuel, Fox Sports, NBC, CBS, INhd, TV Tokyo, etc, etc. (tnx to dad WB7NKR and elmer W7OKV sk for support)

The budgets for our work per hour is in the $80 to $120K range. To compare a network prime time show (ER, Desperate Housewives) is $3 to $4 million an hour.

The technical deal (and expensive one) is the networks don't like SD (standard def video) and they really don't like HDV with lossy codecs.

Now it's only true HD with Sony HDCAM or high end rigs like REDCAM for any Discovery channel or other networks - these cameras cost like two Icom 7800's combined and work up to the 5 - 10 Icom 7800's so you need some deep pockets to rent these rigs even at $700 a pop for a day. Want a Sony HD cam - $42K on up. Then you need the camera operator, the producer, the audio dude, the talent, you get the idea... people aren't cheap, media, travel, lodging, airfare, insurance, wardrobe and makeup for talent, etc.

You can do single person shoots - they look alot like my work for Icom Radio News. Very "ENG style" for those that are in the business.

Most networks won't even consider such a niche topic. Even Norms workshop is safer with "The New Yankee Workshop" - there are like millions of woodworkers in the US and less then 700,000 hams. Numbers = advertisers = money.

Youtube and Hulu, new distribution models are where to look for ham radio media in the future - bypass the satellite and network delivery - the ARRL needs to start doing news shows once a week or team up with Newsline or some such thing, topical programming from volunteers, etc. But again, hard sell - not enough resources in Newington I've been told.

"24 Hours in Brazil" is a mini-documentary produced by Dave Bell W6AQ and sponsored by Icom America/Ray Novak N9JA, whom are both true ham radio video pioneers!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YH9RxMEIoV4&feature=channel_page

Even this simple video cost's thousands...

When you pay a grand for the music license, the 80 hours of my life it took to edit this, the interaction with the producer, etc. Then you count all of W6AQ's time to shoot the single camera production - travel to Brazil, video tape, conduct interviews, so minus set up time, he has days into it.

Making HR video is a passion, no other topic combines the lore, mystique and technical all rolled into one interesting subject or that embraces wide ranging cultures. There are really awesome stories here I just know it - My father (and other WWII era hams), W7NI, the ham kids that keep setting 802.11 distance records, the moonboucers, DXpeditions, IOTA, and hundreds of other ones I'm sure many on Eham browsers could dream up!

The best thing out there that I enjoy is The "Radiologic" Series which is getting it right on so many levels, - free, easy to access and topical. Hats off to Gary to working so hard to make it work!

I'll keep plugging away - Mr. Pierce any room on your staff? hi!

W7NWH

www.youtube.com/w7nwh
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by KG4CLD on February 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
If it hasn't been mentioned yet, perhaps an internet based video forum. Think about it, you could design a pre-recorded amateur radio video website. It would be like combining Eham.net with U-tube. It could be similar to Eham.net text forum, but instead of lots and lots of words mixed with occassional JPEG photos, you could see first hand how hams design and assemble homebrew projects, upgrade and test equipment with step-by-step video commentation and video close-ups.

If you can't get on TV, Cable or Satellite, the internet could become the spring-board into launching amateur radio back into the public eye. With the release of video-cellphones and cheap digital video recorders, its almost foolish not to at least try.

The important thing to consider is making amateur radio fun and exciting. Not just interesting...

"Just a thought!"

 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by W9WHE-II on February 23, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
W0FEN writes:

"I am a Chief Engineer at an NPR FM station in a major market(Kansas City, USA). I know that it would be extremely difficult to get a weekly radio on this station".

Yup. Very true.
The ONLY ways you are going to get an AR program onto NPR is:

a) Make a WHOPPING cash contribution (buy your way); or
b) portray AR as some socialist-liberal-progressive ajenda.

Otherwise, getting a AR program onto National [Socialist] Public Radio is impossible. Forget that WE taxpayers PAY for NPSR.
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by N4ECW on February 27, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Check out www.tedrandall.com and the QSO show on 7.415 shortwave
 
RE: Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by KD5XB on March 1, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Soooo.......

What to do if you DO have the screw installed, and you're getting RF in the shack/vehicle....

Hmm...
 
Radio Programs on Ham Radio!  
by KK5DON on March 3, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I'm a frequent guest on the Trucking Channel on both XM and Sirius satellite radio. I don't know the XM channel, but it's channel 147 on Sirius and I'm next on between 2pm and 4pm Eastern time this Thursday, March 5th. I talk tech and answer questions about tech from the truckers, but I promote Amateur Radio at every opportunity. And, more and more, a caller will introduce himself with his callsign! When that happens, we happily talk about the joys of being an amateur radio operator. With that, more callers are enquiring as to how to get started with ham radio. I'm more than happy to help them out.
 
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