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[Articles Home]  [Add Article]  

Are You Ready For Winter?

lou giovannetti (KB2DHG) on October 24, 2010
View comments about this article!

Winter is right around the corner and the freezing weather and high winds are sure to come... ARE YOU READY FOR IT?

I write this article with the intention of bringing to mind that NOW is the time we should all be checking our antennas, their mountings and conditions... To me there is nothing more soothing and enjoyable than being snowed in on a Saturday with nothing to do but sit in my shack and operate... I get on the air and chat with my fellow hams all over the world from the cozy confines of my little corner in my condo...

I have fortunately permission for one antenna as long as it is stealth and does not cause any damage to the condo... I would comply with these requests and installed my antenna as such or so I thought? So being a big HF operator the best I could come up with is a G5RV. I had it set on a 3/4-inch diameter electrical metallic tubing 20 foot up (the roof of the condo is 88 feet up so total height is 108 feet) attached to a strong vent pipe and in an inverted-V. I was cheap in buying proper material to erect this antenna. Using 3/4 pipe surly was not a good idea. I also just had it tied with heavy string wrapped around the vent pipe. Very poor construction to say the least...

All things considering it works pretty well... BUT unfortunately if fell victim to a high wind and snow storm one Friday night last winter... My Saturday relaxing in my cozy shack turned into a grueling day up on a roof freezing my you know what off erecting a totally new mast and antenna... The heavy ice and wind bent that 3/4-inch tubing like a pretzel... So off to the Home Depot to get new mast and hardware...

This time I used 1 1/2" tubing and installed a pulley at the top so I can raise and lower the G5RV to inspect and service it. I also purchased good pipe clamps and securely attached it to the existing vent pipe. FAST FORWARD, I now had a good sturdy serviceable antenna system. By 4:30 that afternoon I was back on the air. BUT it did not come without pain and suffering, it was cold and working in a foot of snow on a slippery roof was not fun.

SO my fellow hams, I offer you this sound advice, get out there NOW and make sure your antennas are in good condition and can survive the harsh weather months ahead.

I operate all year round but during the cold winter months I am truly glued to my HAM RADIO...
So take the time now to make these repairs and adjustments while the weather is good...
GOOD DX TO YA... 73 DE: KB2DHG

Member Comments:
This article has expired. No more comments may be added.
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by NN4RH on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Don't forget to drain the coax. If those electrons freeze in there, the coax may burst.
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by KQ9J on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
It's a well-known fact that antennas assembled and erected under sub-zero blizzard conditions outperform and outlast any other. Don't know what you're worried about. Keep you life insurance paid up and have fun!
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by KF7ATL on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Thanks for the timely reminder, Lou. It made me realize that my dipole has already survived one Utah winter, and I need to take it down and inspect it to make sure it can survive another.


Garth, KF7ATL
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by KC3JV on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Good advice! Even here in Phily ice build up had caused problems with my Titan GAP on the counterpoise wire and arms.
Mark KC3JV
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter?  
by KA4KOE on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Lube the bearings on the fan dipole with something that won't seize up in low low temperatures. This is a must know item for those of us with this incredible wonder-tenna.

PAN
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by KL7AJ on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
We have four seasons in Fairbanks; early winter, mid winter, late winter, and next winter... :)

Fortunately we get the advantage of "adversity gain" by putting antennas up in the winter. They always work better. :)

Eric
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter?  
by N4TTS on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Winter? Winter? I live in Mobile, Alabama. We don't need no stinking winter...

Don N4TTS
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter?  
by W9PMZ on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
"By 4:30 that afternoon I was back on the air. BUT it did not come without pain and suffering, it was cold and working in a foot of snow on a slippery roof was not fun. "

An almost receiptant of a Darwin Award...

73,

Carl - W9PMZ
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter?  
by K4JSR on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Feeeee-Lep;

Just what would you know about winter.
I thought they outlawed that season in your neck of the woods.

Make it up to this neck of the woods and Rich and I will crack open a bottle of antifreeze suitable for a
Thereminstrel. How can you refuse that offer?

73, Cal K4JSR
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by LA1BRA on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Ya'll come visit me this winter in Norway, I thought it got cold down on the Gulf coast in Texas till I started living here. Snow, no problem, have plenty to share
Good advice either way, I make sure on my connections are sealed up good, cause under the snow they are hard to find.
73 de LA1BRA (aka KB5VWZ)
tom
 
Thereminstrel  
by KA4KOE on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Just remember that I am good enough (or my clients stupid enough or simply with no sense of good taste) to be be paid to perform on my diabolical musical instrument.

BTW, I love the word "Diabolical" and try to use it at least once daily in my speech.

Philip
KA4KOE
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by N8GXZ on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Seems like in years past I always ended up putting
antennas in the cold winter weather. This year by God I think I'm ready
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by K9CTB on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Very good advice Lou ...

Although I couldn't resist enjoying some of the comments... after all, it *does* take extra time for those butane soldering irons to heat antenna wires when there's an inch of ice on them ;) Just allow extra time (and butane).

Had a KL7 tell me once that old "Spend 10% of your ham budget on gear, 90% on your antenna" statement is junk. Up there it's 50% on Carhartts and a good parka, 40% on antennas and 10% on gear.

So I gotta figure when I worked that KL7 who had the log periodic and a room full of IC-7800s ... his foul weather gear was probably a NASA Space Suit.

73,
K9CTB
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by K0IC on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
I like NVIS antennas. I like split bolts instead of soldering. My lazy end-fed antenna is around ten foot high. I use a door spring to take the slack out when the ice builds up. We have had several bad ice storms and wind storms since I erected my lazy antenna some twenty years ago and it never has come down.
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter?  
by W7ETA on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
being snowed in==fell victim to a high wind and snow storm==grueling day up on a roof freezing ==heavy ice

Jeeseeeeee!!!??? Where do you live that you have to endure dastardly WX like that?

Winter time is supposed to be antenna and tower time. The steel is cool enuff that one can hold it in a bare hand. No sunburn if you are outside for an hour during the afternoon. No worries about stepping near a low lying bush and getting snake bit—they are all asleep. No need for constantly rehydrating. Streams of sweat don't tumble off your fore head, into your eyes and over your glasses.

Plus, during winter you can actually have cool/cold tap water. During the rest of the year, we run out of it.

If you do tower work just before Christmas you get to see all the outdoor Xmas lights, the luminores, and the preparations for when Salsa Clause arrives in his red Jalapeño sleigh drawn by 8 Habanero peppers, one of them called Rudolph because of a DNA break he is bright red instead of orange, delivering red and green tamales and piñatas filled with treats to all of good amigitas y amigitos.

Love winter antenna season

73
Bob
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter?  
by W3JKS on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Nothing like a nice cold winter rain to make antenna work a real pleasure. :-)

73,
john W3JKS/AAT3BF/AAM3EDE/AAM3RE/AAA9SL
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter?  
by NB3O on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
"The steel is cool enuff that one can hold it in a bare hand."

Yeah, but letting it go is the bigger problem here, like putting one's tongue on a frozen lamp post.....
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by KH6JRM on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Makes me glad I live on the Big Island of Hawaii. Hams in the 50th state have their share of weather problems, too. You'd be surprised the damage acid rain (courtesy of the Kilauea Volcano) and salt air can do to antennas. Be careful on that roof top. 73 es Aloha from Laupahoehoe.
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter?  
by N3HAM on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
You guys should know the joy of pulling in heavy phone cables in rear property and then later in your career splicing such cables off a ladder(you might have slid across the ice) or pole in the dead of winter. What finger tips? Antenna work.....piece of cake.
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter?  
by VE3FMC on October 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
I always end up doing some sort of antenna work in the winter months.

Last year I had to wade through the 3 foot build up of snow in the front yard to tie off antennas.

I don't mind working on them when it is cold. As long as the wind is not blowing.

My roof is easy to walk on as it is low sloped so the peak is easy to move about on.

My problem is I love to golf and when the weather is decent I am on the golf course, not putting antennas up!
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter?  
by W3JKS on October 25, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
The secret to working in reasonable comfort is wearing the correct clothing for the climate. I have a set of "old" Army ECWCS (Extreme Cold Weather Clothing System). Layered with Goretex. Really, really nice in cold wet weather...

73,
john W3JKS/AAT3BF/AAM3EDE/AAM3RE/AAA9SL
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by K7NNG on October 25, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
It got cold and rainy here in this part of COLORADO over the week, so I got out and put up a long wire and battened everything else down good and tight. Ready for the best mother nature can throw at us.
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by K3STX on October 25, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
I don't do ANY antenna work until the hose-bibs for the outdoor spigots are sealed off! You are SUPPOSED to do all antenna work in the Winter. (Not sure about climbing on a snow covered roof though, that sounds sort of scary).

But seriously, the article DID make me think about the upcoming contest/DX season, so there are things I better start working on up in those trees.

paul
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by NX7U on October 25, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
I always chuckle when the May QST comes out announcing the beginning of "Antenna Season".
Here in Phoenix you'd have to be seriously demented to start antenna work in May. Raw aluminum left in the sun is waaay too hot to touch after about 3 minutes.
So...NOW is antenna season! The new satellite az-el system will be built in Nov-Dec.
I think I'll survive winter...next summer, not so sure.
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter? Caution!!  
by W0FM on October 25, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Fun article, however a word of caution is appropriate here. You have a nice agreement with the condo association to erect your antenna as long as it does not cause damage to the condo. NEVER attach something like a 20 foot long piece of conduit to a "very sturdy vent pipe". Those vents (and the seal around them) are not made for the flexing that it will receive. Your installation is a leaking roof looking for a place to happen. I highly recommend that you secure your mast to something other than a vent pipe or your condo antenna agreement may quickly become null and void.

Good luck,

Terry, WØFM
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter? Caution!!  
by N4KC on October 25, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
You jinxed me! My beloved homebrew hexbeam has performed flawlessly for two years...through storms, wind, and more. But this past Saturday, on an absolutely beautiful but windy day, one of the clamps holding the 20-meter element came loose, leaving it touching the other four elements.

Now, just in time for winter, I have to get up there, get 'er down, and do some work on 'er.

Coincidence that this happened the same day this article appeared on eHam?

(BTW, bum beam or not, I worked a bunch of stuff on 12 and 10 with it yesterday.)

Don Keith N4KC
www.n4kc.com
www.donkeith.com
http://n4kc.blogspot.com
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter? Caution!!  
by KB2DHG on October 25, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Thank you for this thought.
Yes I know and took this into consideration I have the mast sitting on a peice of wood and secured with guy wire...
The actual vent pipe is secured in concrete with no couplink...
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by KE4DRN on October 25, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
hi,

Either raising antenna masts in the freezing winter
or in the 95+ heat of the summer for field day.

whatever it takes to get the signal out!

73 james
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter? Caution!!  
by KB2VUQ on October 25, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
And just after you've been standing on the roof (in deep snow) for an hour or two...you get that warm and fuzzy feeling thinking "this isn't so bad, my feet don't hurt anymore" reality sets in during the ambulance ride to the hospital.
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter? Caution!!  
by KC8VWM on October 25, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
73,
john W3JKS/AAT3BF/AAM3EDE/AAM3RE/AAA9SL

-------


I bet you have a heck of a time getting all that out during a DX pileup.

 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by W6GF on October 26, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
I subscribe to the old theory that, if your antenna does not come down in a bad winter, it was not big enough

George, W6GF
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter? Caution!!  
by W3JKS on October 26, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
It's just a matter of which hat I'm wearing at the time! :-)

73,
john W3JKS/AAT3BF/AAM3EDE/AAM3RE/AAA9SL
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter? Caution!!  
by AA4PB on October 26, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
"You have a nice agreement with the condo association to erect your antenna as long as it does not cause damage to the condo"

You might want to think about proper bonding to the building steel too. Otherwise it won't be nice if that steel pipe sticking up in the air 108-feet gets hit with lightning and it follows the vent pipe or coax into the building.

 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter? Caution!!  
by KC8VWM on October 26, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
:-)
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter? Caution!!  
by KB2DHG on October 27, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Well bonding or not it is always a chance. Lightning can cause damage no matter what!BUT yes I ran a #8 wire to the building ground but it was not easy!
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter? Caution!!  
by AA4PB on October 27, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
"Lightning can cause damage no matter what!"

That's true. I've seen a case where lightning came through the roof, causing a fire - and there were no antennas involved. HOWEVER, providing lightning a low impedance path greatly reduces the odds of damage. That's why codes in many places require the installation of lightning rods on tall buildings.

 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by W7KB on October 27, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
In Southern Arizona we actually hope for winter to hurry along and get here.Kind of chilly yesterday.The high was 80 degs.With a high of 88 degs.predicted for Friday.Winter sure is harsh here in the Sonoran Desert.73!Dennis/W7KB.
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by AL7GA on October 27, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Having been born & raised in Fairbanks, now living in the tropics of Anchorage, I can attest to Eric's comments about the "adversity factor". In addition, we find up here that 20 below or colder is an excellent time for tower work since you can stick your tongue to the metal tower, thus freeing both hands for tightening bolts!
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by N8RAT on October 28, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Remember the old adage, If your antenna didn’t fall down last winter, it wasn’t big enough.
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by N1VY on October 29, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
I'm trying to think of something clever for a general reply, but I'm just not making it tonight.

On the serious side, I have antanna covenants where I live, that preclude putting antennas up outside.

These covenants are with my wife!!

"You're not putting those nasty looking things on our roof, or draping them off of the house.!!

It's a large 1830's farm house that runs 50 feet in one direction, and 30 in the other.

All antennas whether 2M,440,or as long as 80M, are under the roof.

I have an Ameritron RCS-10 that switches the individual "flatback" HF dipoles for each band.

Therefore, no winter worries.

This arrangement has taken me from Rio to Moscow to all of Europe.
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter?  
by KC8VWM on October 30, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Get a new wife. :)
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by K5END on October 30, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
I guess we are lucky in this regard. It's the opposite here around Houston. Summer here is the time to avoid the outdoors.

We have 3 kinds of weather here:
"nice,"
"flooding" and
"why does it have to be so eff'ing hot and GD humid?"
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter?  
by K8JD on November 2, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
For me , getting ready for winter is making sure my 160 and 80M antennas \are tuned up for the bottom of the band.
When summer ends, the QRN on the top band starts to drop and the ops who have been summering on the higher bands start returning to chew the rag..
Look for me around 1820 or 3550 or down lower on those bands73...JD
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter?  
by WA2JJH on November 7, 2010 Mail this to a friend!


Seqway into the topic. Is may shack and my self ready for the winter. My roof is 100 meters above sea level.
The great winds of the hudson river has destroyed ANY antenna
I put up.

So before each winter, I simply use the old dipole made with 4 conductor 16 guage or lower flat insulated wire.
I get good results. Many with ribbon multicable verticals, dipoles or inverted V's swear by the cheapskate disposable's

For Vertical support a have a PVC pole that is 5 four foot
poles. I like using PVC mast segments. They stack together in seconds. I do drill a hole for a nut and bolt. This is dual purpose.
The 20 foot PVC pool is about the max for me. However If I decide to go with 40 foot. The nuts and bolts can also be used for guy wires. Just add insulator and a turnbuckle at 25 feet.

Cut out a small section of conductor on all 4 conductors.
I Cut at 8.5 feet, 12,14, and 18 feet.
The counterpoise is about the same but I add 10%. That just drops down off the roof.
I get 2:1 or better on 10,12,15,20,and 40M. I do add 2-4 6 guage copper wire's at the top of the antennna. Each one is 4 foot long. I am getting a virtual very low Q trap.
I added radials too in the many ones I have had. Add radials about 10 feet above my roof.
I buy a set of 10/11 meter fiberglass loaded radials. The 10 M radials are only four foot long. However there is 9 feet of wire inside then very loosly coiled.
One can even put 2 of those cheapo CB groundplane radials in series. Result my 20M radials are only eight foot long.
This year I went nuts. The 10M radials give me an 8 foot plus diameter. I took 33 feet of ribbon. Soldered at both ends.
The 4 33 foot conductors in parallel will present ultra low Q.
I added another 33 foot 4 conductor flat.
What makes them work so well is that instead of 1 circle only 10 feet above a roof is that the two 33 foot radials are half above my roof. The other eight feet are cable tied to the end of the 10M radials. More than 1/2 of the 33 feet drop down from the radials. The 2 S shaped radials are around 90 feet above sea level.

The wind and ice do a number on the multicore/band ribbon cable. The vertical ribbon always attracts ice. Not a total loss. I i I used thick PVC for the support. The ribbon radiator is cable tied to the PVC pole.

The PVC and loaded radials are saved for the next spring antenna installation. The mangled ribbon radiator and counterpoise, I throw away in the recycled garbage can.
One can get the 4 conductor rotor cable cheap.

EVERY SINGLE store purchased vertical I tried in the past will only last for 2 winters. 14AVQ, 18V, a comet mutibander, and the infamous P.O.S Deluxe IMAX-2000 gave excellent coverage
a single mode.
The Imax-2000 famous from ebay is a 5/8 wave for 10-12M only. The 24foot 5/8 wave is done by the first section is a 16 foot U in the first 8 foot segment. REMOVE THE GAMMA MATCH.
If you do not, the antenna becomes a short cicuit above 15M.
You can decide only to connect the hot inner conductor to the pl-259. Then feed the radials and counterpoise fron the sheild.

One should use a current balun. The DX engineering current
Baluns, I heard good things about. Some say it's much to pay for a balun. However the $12 Baluns melt at 100W. They are not much better than the useless baluns inside MFJs tuners.
However, the $79 handles more than legal limit.
I would hope to get Better feed point symetry. Increased BW, a far better EQUAL distribution of transfered power, and some claim exceptional TVI/RFI reduction. As good as an RF coax choke......... Perhaps both. Balun at feed point, few turns of coax, then an coax in/out coax choke near the rig. one in shack?
However my shack TV does not go scewball. Not sure, but I used to get into the phone lines. No compaints from my neighbors since I wrapped the coax at the antenna end around a metal vent pipe, I used 10 turns on a 6" dia. vent pipe.

Imax-2000's are crap. Yes, I got euphoric when I removed the gamma match/lightning protector.
Before ice build up broke it, I had a solid 24 feet of radiator, radials and drop down counterpoise(the ribbon cable). .
A homebrewers performance/RFI cure all/noise floor reducer/match box enhancher. $79 bux seems great, if all that is done,


This winter I think the all PVC masting and 14 guage 4 conductor ribbon counterpoise, 2 10M loaded radials with a proper feedpoint interface(current balun) I just strapped it to the PVC pole.
I would like to hear about anti-ice tactics. I have heard everything. Vaseline, vegetable oil, ethylene glycol(automobile antifreeze, add layers of plastic wrap coated with rubber or elmers glue.
I think it is funny that the homebrew lasted
\

===








 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter?  
by NF6V on November 8, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Do it guys!

I'm down here in VK3 looking for you and I want to work you this winter!

Tweak things up and get on the air!

Cheers
Steve VK3TDX
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by K8ELR on November 11, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
I am waiting for a snow STORM to put up the dipole and vertical I built this summer.

73
Jim K8ELR
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by KC0NIB on November 14, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
I'm good. Ground mounted HF6V and guyed - Check. Coax to this antenna buried under yard up to the house and in good condition all ends. Check. SWR; check. Side of house mounted UHF/VHF dual band; stable and good SWR check. We're good.

Radio party. Bring it!!!

73!

Jeff
KC0NIB
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by K1CJS on November 15, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
I'm good too--antennas taken down and stripped, ready to be put back up, and all rigs except for the mobile packed away for the move I expect to be making shortly.

No worries, and I be happy!
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter?  
by W2MV on November 16, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
One of the best antennas I ever put up was as a young ham: a 40 meter dipole during a snow storm on the roof of the apartment bldg I lived in at the time. Oh yes, it was at night and so cold that I had to come in every 10 minutes to warm up.
Soldering the PL-259, connecting it to my Drake R-4C, and hearing lots of signals, was my reward!
For some reason, every contact made with that particular antenna was special.
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by M1WML on November 25, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
like a wise old ham operator told me:- put it up right sleep tight at night..
 
RE: Are You Ready For Winter? mobile/H-T proactive  
by WA2JJH on November 26, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Perhaps tips old and new to deal with weather proofing.
Mobile ops. Here is a true but sad mobile in winter event.

About 30 Years ago a friend N2PM-SK, died in his Mobile.
He did have one of the first Dual band 40W out 2M/70cm.
He had a few heart operations in the past.

Got into his car, and he tried to start it. It was very cold and Pauls car batt. was almost dead. The DC starter motor could not get enough curent.

He got on the nearest 2M repeater. All that was heard was poor old Paul gasping, and not able to give his location. Back then, If the repeater did not have a phone patch, 2 would call 911. All traffic would stop. Those with synth rather then xtal contolled radio's, would QSY to the input freq. of the repeater.
The intent was to to get signal strengths from as many other
hams. Two hams had beams. Only one could get full quieting RX of Pauls mobile. The input was silent. ONLY IF......I dunno. We had the people but not enough time! Paul died, the cold, the stress and he was 83 years YOUNG!!!
Looking back -- 3 signal strenghs, one could get a rough triangelation of a location on any map of the local area.

Pauls car batt went dead, as we all hoped to find 3 or more hams with 2M Beam antenna's. As most know with 3 directional antenna's, a Triangalated location is a point of 3 graphed
Paul Died. for back up. Then again, very few hams could afford to shell out the additional money for the 6 channel Wilson H-T, after they got an HF rig.
Pauls mobile was the first
synthesised mobile/over the shoulder portable. Remember the old Wison WE-800? 1 Watt out on penlight batts and rubber helix 1/4 wave. In your Car 4W out to the shared BNC

The bottom line is some today get their new cars with the dual batt/premium extra amperage alternator.
Most hams have a dual band H-T and a 50W+ dual or tribander.
All the smart cell phones have GPS with Google Map and Satelight vew. (It is not anywhere realtime) I zoomed right in to the top of my 5 story walk up. I did see a blurry image of my antenna.)Max zoom in for consumer GPS.
Many this winter will get lost or need directions for holiday dinner. You may want to have an extra car batt in the trunk.

The prices of 12VDC to 110 VAC Inverters are cheap. Using the newest generation in CMOS Power FETs and IC's for regulation.
Light weight Torroidal transformers step up the power of the CMOS Switching transistors to a well regulated real sine wave.
Result 90%+ eff. Light, small, and no more TO-3 transistor cases exposed to the elements.
I paid $30 for 200W. It is the size of a pack of cancerettes!!!!!
Lithium Polymer Batts have extreme power density. I see cheap laptop batts use lithium Polymer.
Ready for winter....sure. Do I like the cold-n-snow.....NO!!!!!!!

Looking back, some non ham barked at the table......"How come your silly dead friend not have a Cellphone!!!!! Even homeless people got em, the under-grad college E.E. future wannebe shouted!!!!!
Back then cell phones were $1.50/minute to use. Only very well off folk could afford to buy the luggable 3W lunch box sized portable 800mhz analog Motorola only portable. I explained nicely to the 20 year old (My friends oldest son)
(in my mind. only....You spoiled Little "Trust-fund baby")
 
Are You Ready For Winter?  
by WS2L on December 2, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
These are the times I'm happy that my Landlord would only let me put up a vertical in the back yard. If I have to make repairs or chip ice off the coils and such they are all at ground level. Worst case scenario I can pull it out of the ground, bring it in the house through the back door and work on it inside if necessary.
 
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