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How to Improve Your CW Speed:

Jim "Elvis" Seifert (AD6WL) on November 24, 2010
View comments about this article!

You have just learned CW and now what? You may try listening on the bands and find that the speeds are just to fast for you to even think about trying to copy. This can get very discouraging for a new ham, or any ham who is just starting with CW.

Many new hams want to operate CW but often find the speeds they hear on the air to be very intimidating. You can just listen to the ARRL CW practice on the air but that gets boring after awhile. There is another option. There is a Yahoo group devoted to QRS CW.

This is a great opportunity for new hams to get together with other hams who operate at the same speed and for some of you experienced CW ops to share information with the group and QRS to make contacts with these new hams. I have found the best way to enjoy CW was to make contacts with other hams. After operating QRS for a while you will notice that your speed will start to increase. The website for the group is:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/QRS-CW/.

Here is a list of the unofficial QRS CW operating frequencies. These frequencies are only a guideline as a place for the group to meet and are not part of any band plan. If you hear a slow speed CQ out there then answer the call and enjoy a relaxed QSO at a slower speed.

1.850
3.700
7.124/7.050
10.125
14.050
21.150/21.125
24.8915
28.160

Most QRS activity seems to be on 7.050 & 14.050.

73, Jim
AD6WL

Member Comments:
This article has expired. No more comments may be added.
 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by AB3CX on November 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Many of the hams who enjoy and use CW regularly today are older generation hams, who learned CW as teens, typically age 12-14. Language, sports, musical, social and other skills are more naturally aquired in youth; not that adults can't do it, they certainly can. It's just more work, and maybe you won't achieve the level you might have. The preservation of a core of great CW ops into the future depends on recruiting young hams into the mode and getting them to practice it and develop those skills while they are still young. So elmer a young ham in your DX or contest station!! Back in the day, we were forced to learn and use CW, and it became my default mode. To emulate the top dogs on the air at the time, I listened to ARRL high speed CW practice and eventually got the certificate for 40 WPM. Even after a 30 year layoff from ham radio, my CW skills snapped right back, and I only attribute that to having started young and basically wired some part of my brain to the activity.
Speed is only one part of CW fluency. Being able to decipher what's going on in pileups with multiple signals depends on being able to decode multiple signals simultaneously, and discriminate the significant from the insignificant. Figuring out quickly who is talking to who, and who is not talking to who, understanding the rules of the road, and what is appropriate and what is not are as important as the difference between 15 and 25 WPM.
It's logical to think that the future of ham radio will include CW, but that digital modes will gradually assume more and more prominence and that CW will shrink in use proportionally. That's fixed in the rules of licensing now and very unlikely to go back the other way.
 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by VE6TL on November 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
There is no question that CW is a language and for those who have ever studied a foreign language, the key is, "if you don't use it, you lose it." Continuing the analogy a bit further, those that have done well with foreign languages generally have succeeded by immersing themselves in that environment as the brain struggles to make sense of the input. The other thing we know about learning languages is that the younger you are, the easier it is. Scientists have actually proven that children use a different part of the brain for learning languages than adults. This doesn't mean adults can't learn foreign languages or CW - it just requires more effort and practice. After a hiatus of over 25 years away from the hobby, I found I was able to recover my CW skills that I had learned as a teenager by doing lots of practice. At first, I started by listening to CW QSOs at slow speeds at writing everything down on paper - letter by letter. After a while, I found I was able to copy more and more in my head and relied on the paper less and less. But what really helped me was sending CW. I would sit there with a book and for about 20 minutes or so each day I would send CW with my paddle/keyer. When it become comfortable at a certain speed, I would increase it so it was more challenging. It only took a few weeks until I was back up to speeds that are typical of most QSOs for DXing or contesting. I figure that by the brain hearing all those sounds and patterns generated by sending CW, it also improves the ability to receive CW. Perhaps the main point is to just keep at it on a regular basis, whatever seems to work best.
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by AB9NZ on November 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Morse proficiency is such a wonderful thing. Learning something like telegraphy, tig welding, riding a unicycle, or mastering tying a turks-head knot give the kind of deep satisfaction that will never be found in buying something. Best of 73 de Tom AB9NZ http://radiotelegrapher.posterous.com/
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by W5ESE on November 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Good article, but I have one minor quibble; if you go to 3700 KHz looking to make CW contacts, you're not likely to have much luck. It's in the phone band these days, since the regrettable "Novice Refarming"
FCC ruling.

I think folks would have more luck around 3555 KHz
or thereabouts.

Scott
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by N5XM on November 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
It's important to remember that anything worth having takes time to acquire. Part of it is building a CW vocabulary, and this takes time. Always do your best to use proper spacing between characters and words. Work on both sending and recieving skills. There are many ways to improve, but do something every day. Your stamina will build over time. Listen to on-air QSOs that are faster than you can copy, but don't worry about how much you can copy. Get used to hearing the tempo and spacing. Then find a slower QSO and you will find it easier to copy. Get on the air and do the best you can. There are a lot of Qs on the air under 20 wpm, so get in them. Work on your fist, as you will find the better your sending, the less likely another op will want to say 73 and end the contact. Good luck
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by NG9W on November 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
I believe CW is still a permitted mode on ALL bands except 60 meters. In the 80 meter band phone is NOT permitted between 3500 and 3600 kHz. So one could certainly do CW on 3700 kHz quite legally.
 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by WX7K on November 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
There is also the Staright Key Century Club (SKCC) out there. They advertise that they have ops monitoring 7.114 who are willing to go slow for anyone wanting to practice and improve. I have made numerous contacts on that frequency, but late at night it is often not monitored.

I am returning to CW after a 6 year absence. I find it hard getting my speed back, but as has been said there is no substitute for getting on the air regularly. Also, accuracy is much preferred over speed. I could care less if you are sending a 35 wpm if I can't tell your dits and dahs aprat or if you send the same letter differently each time.

Bottom line, be accurate and the speed will come.
 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by W1ITT on November 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
People are different, and various methods bring success. I have found that attempting to copy beyond my ability gives good results in increasing CW copy speed. Listening to the W1AW transmission that start fast at 35 wpm, then go progressively slower works well. At first, you'll be lucky to get a few odd letters, then words will start appearing. When they decrease to 30 and 25 wpm you'll grab a few more. And things will get better after a week or three of work.
In the good old days when they still had Coast Stations, I used to listen to WCC out of Chatham Massachusetts at 2300 Eastern time on 2026 khz (it may have been kc back then). They used to run a press synopsis of the day's news at 30 or 35 wpm for a few minutes. It seemed to be more useful than cruising the bands listening for QRQ stations, some of whom have less than perfect fists. I'm not aware of any stations regularly offering very fast...above 35 wpm...on a regular basis, but there is software that takes care of that, although there is something more fun about copying off the air.
As with any other worthwhile pursuit, it takes time and effort,
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by KE5FRF on November 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Good advice here, but a minor quibble myself on one thing that wasn't said but could have been.

If the QRQ CW speeds are intimidating to someone who is trying to build up his/her speed (which it always is), pigeon-holing into QRS watering holes is not going to do much to change that. You'll hit a "wall" of comfort and quite possibly not break that wall.

The challenge is to find the fastest QSO that you can somewhat copy (perhaps 60-70%)---turn down the lights, put on the cans, put your feet up, close your eyes, and LISTEN to the exchanges. Pick out what you can copy and if you do this for a month, you'll find that you can make sense of the QSO. You might even try meeting someone at that speed if you've practiced sending (another must because they go hand in hand).

Eventually you'll be 3 or 4 WPM faster and not even know it. Put away the straight key and bring out the bug or keyer. Now, hunt some faster QSOs to listen to, and eventually jump into.

For a new op, 12 WPM is "QRQ". 20 WPM is "what the heck?"...Unfortunately, some older ops stay in that realm too because they pigeon-hole themselves. It doesn't take much more than persistance and practice for 20 WPM to eventually become QRS, reading QST while you QSO material.
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by KE5FRF on November 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Forgot to mention something that popped into my mind while writing my reply. I've been a dedicated CW op since not long after licensing. I routinely work most anyone I hear on the bands, though there are some TRULY QRQ guys in the 50+ range with keyboards that I someday strive to "run with". One of the most enjoyable ops to work is W9FAM, Vern. He's sending, often in that 50 WPM range, but he has an interesting way of spacing (not quite farnsworth, but not quite standard) that makes his fist copyable even to a 35-40 WPM op. If you are looking to really become fast at CW, find Vern on the band and work him. He'll give you a work-out that will truly improve your skill and confidence.
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by N4JTE on November 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
No offense to the "author" but I was hoping for an article, not a link, oh well, I'll get over it and eat some more turkey !
 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by KJ1H on November 24, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Send at the speed you want to receive, especially when calling CQ. If answering a CQ call, answer it at the speed the other station is sending. Don't be afraid to ask the other station to QRS. If you are asked to QRS, then slow down, no matter how slow you may already be sending.

The person who copies CW slowest should be the one in charge of how fast the QSO goes. That's not to say the slower op can't push their envelope a little bit by sending slightly faster than they can copy (most people find sending easier anyway). If it's too fast, just slow down and send "PSE QRS." There's no reason for anyone to not QRS when asked.

I've been off HF for probably 15 years or so. The thing I'm looking forward to most about getting back on in the near future is operating CW. I'm sure my speed will not be what it once was at first, but I'll regain it the way I learned in the first place - practice through QSOs. Though no longer a requirement, I believe CW will always be an important part of ham radio.
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by N2EY on November 25, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Good stuff, but a couple of points:

1) Yes, it's legal to operate CW on 3.700 MHz (if you have the license class for it), but it's not good practice since 75 was expanded. And your success rate in finding slow CW QSOs will be very low. Much better to look around 3.550 MHz or so. Any US licensed ham can operate CW there, regardless of license class.

2) Having slow CW QSOs will help your overall CW skillset (Morse is a set of skills, not just one). But if it's speed you're after, you need practice that pushes your capabilities. One does not learn to run faster by walking a lot.

3) Contests can be a good way to improve your CW skills. They offer intense activity in a relatively short time.

4) CW is a lot more fun if your station is designed for it. A good CW rig with a sharp filter, slow tuning rate, defeatable AGC, RIT and other features is a lot more fun to use than an SSB rig that happens to have a key jack. A good solid op table with lots of room for you to stretch out an rest your arm as you send can be a big improvement over a cramped setup. A lot of CW ops prefer 'phones, others like a speaker. Lighting, seating and other comforts can make a big difference too.

73 de Jim, N2EY
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by N2EY on November 25, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Good stuff, but a couple of points:

1) Yes, it's legal to operate CW on 3.700 MHz (if you have the license class for it), but it's not good practice since 75 was expanded. And your success rate in finding slow CW QSOs will be very low. Much better to look around 3.550 MHz or so. Any US licensed ham can operate CW there, regardless of license class.

2) Having slow CW QSOs will help your overall CW skillset (Morse is a set of skills, not just one). But if it's speed you're after, you need practice that pushes your capabilities. One does not learn to run faster by walking a lot.

3) Contests can be a good way to improve your CW skills. They offer intense activity in a relatively short time.

4) CW is a lot more fun if your station is designed for it. A good CW rig with a sharp filter, slow tuning rate, defeatable AGC, RIT and other features is a lot more fun to use than an SSB rig that happens to have a key jack. A good solid op table with lots of room for you to stretch out an rest your arm as you send can be a big improvement over a cramped setup. A lot of CW ops prefer 'phones, others like a speaker. Lighting, seating and other comforts can make a big difference too.

73 de Jim, N2EY
 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by KB2DHG on November 25, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Nice post... improve your CW speed? One word PRACTICE!

CW is a fantastic craft... Truly a great mode...
Remember, IF YOU DON'T KNOW CW YOU DON'T KNOW DIT
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by N4OI on November 25, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
One more thought -- do not be discouraged if you are outside the "profile" -- younger, gifted in languages and music.

I have been a ham for 8 years and work solely CW mode -- very comfortable rag chewing at around 25 wpm or so.

Taught myself beginning at age 50 (i.e., old guy) and have never picked up any languages and certainly not musically inclined.

So the moral is: don't let the "profile" get you down -- have fun!

73 es God Bless de Ken - N4OI
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by W6MQI on November 25, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
IF YOU DON'T KNOW CW YOU DON'T KNOW DIT

I'm surprised no one has put this on the front of a tee shirt or ball cap I like it.
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by KB6QXM on November 26, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
This would be a nice for a T-shirt:

I said KNOW CODE not NO CODE

 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by W8FU on November 26, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Two of the best things I found to help increase my CW speed are unfortunately not available today. I used to listen to coastal stations sending messages to ships as well as press text. That really helped a lot and was somewhat more interesting than W1AW practice. Unfortunately, there are no longer any coastal stations using CW but ARRL code practice does remain useful. The other exercise I found to be very helpful was to participate in CW traffic nets which not only improved my speed but also accuracy. Although there is not much traffic remaining on the CW nets there still is some and it remains a good opportunity for practice. There are CW traffic nets operating at both higher speeds and lower speeds.

I agree that it is important to make an effort to send good clean CW. That can also help with reception. Above all, it is important to have fun when operating CW. As your proficiency improves you will find that you are no longer copying individual letters but words and phrases. Interestingly, as your speed improves it becomes more difficult to copy slower speed CW because the brain does not integrate individual letters into words as well.

Good luck.

Bruce-W8FU
 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by W8WZ on November 26, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
I love CW and got my Extra back when you had to pass the 20 WPM test. Back then there were lots of "Novice" classes to teach people CW and lots of people always working to improve their speed to pass the 13 WPM test to get their general, and the 20 to get their extra.

It is harder for hams to learn code today because such classes and groups of people learning together don't seem to be as popular. However, there are some things around today that were not around back then.

One of them is "Podcasts". I listen to a 25 WPM CW podcast every day called "Quote of the day" http://www.morseresource.com/podcasts.php


The podcast is available in 30, 25, 20, 15, 10 and i think 5 WPM versions. It syncs to my Ipod and I always have it. If I'm sitting on the train bored, I just flip to a podcast and listen to the quote of the day in CW and it helps me keep in practice.

 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by W8WZ on November 26, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
I love CW and got my Extra back when you had to pass the 20 WPM test. Back then there were lots of "Novice" classes to teach people CW and lots of people always working to improve their speed to pass the 13 WPM test to get their general, and the 20 to get their extra.

It is harder for hams to learn code today because such classes and groups of people learning together don't seem to be as popular. However, there are some things around today that were not around back then.

One of them is "Podcasts". I listen to a 25 WPM CW podcast every day called "Quote of the day" http://www.morseresource.com/podcasts.php


The podcast is available in 30, 25, 20, 15, 10 and i think 5 WPM versions. It syncs to my Ipod and I always have it. If I'm sitting on the train bored, I just flip to a podcast and listen to the quote of the day in CW and it helps me keep in practice.

 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by W7DDD on November 27, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Hey, I'm there!!! I dropped CW 50 years ago - could do about 20-25. I decided to start up again. My brain was still wired for about 18 letters - no problemo. The other 8 letters - BIG problemo! Anyhow, I got all the code stuffed back in the right grey cells.

As someone mentioned, I got that under control by merely sending. I remember doing that as a kid. I send magazine articles, and the license plate of the guy in front of me at a red lite. I can send pretty good!!! Maybe 20-25 wpm.

My problem is RECEIVING. I'm hopeless. (My wife is French, and I have the same problem there - I can read a French newspaper, and talk - but when the other person answers, I go belly up instantly.) I tried assorted decoding programs - most were poor - free or paid. The best I found was Multi-PSK by F6CTE, which I highly recommend.

I tried every learning program out there. They are pretty good at learning the code but the best by far for me is another French product: CW_Player. I can't rave enough about this program.

Learn the code, and then take the Quiz's - starting with Nbr 1 (you can make up your own to add to the 20 excellent pre-packaged ones.) The beauty is - it's interactive. Listen to the code and then enter the character. It keeps track of your score and tells you which ones you need to work on.

All I can say is - it is beyond fantastic. I picked up more in one hour than I had in months of trying. It's actually fun!!! Work through the lessons, then jack up the speed.

It's so good, I actually ordered a Bengali key for my Xmas present. I'm gonna go back to code. Get on-the-air for Straight Key nite! An old dog who just learned a new trick!!!

Bob B.

P.S. Thank you - Merci Beaucoup F6DQM
 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by WD9FUM on November 27, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Carl, thank you for the info on the CW podcast.
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by KF7ATL on November 28, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
If you are looking for slow-speed contacts, check out the Straight Key Century Club (SKCC). The web page is found at www.skccgroup.com. Members are more that happy to work QRS ops and are very patient and helpful. The suggested Elmer frequency (that is monitored by members) is 7114. They even sponsor monthly sprints, which are like a contest only less formal and slower paced (and mostly for fun).

Garth, KF7ATL
SKCC #5914T
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by W8WZ on November 29, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
You are welcome!
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by W8WZ on November 29, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
You are welcome!
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by K4RLL on December 5, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
I agree 100% with W1ITT. When I was boning up for the extra code exam, I would listen to W1AW at 35 wpm without writing. I always heard that you could copy whole words in your head but I was skeptical. Words like 'the' 'and' 'this' all of a sudden I was able to copy in my head. By the time the speed got down to 20wpm, it actually seemed slow. About 3 weeks of W1AW 2-3 times a night and I was able to ace the code exam.
 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by W2CSH on December 8, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
I have used http://aa9pw.com/morsecode/ web site for a few years. It will let you read magazines and periodicals sent in code or concentrate on characters, numbers and letters of choice. He recently developed an iPhone app that is very good so you can practice anywhere.
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by K3ZL on December 8, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
You are right. I learned cw when I was in the 7th grade, and at that time it was pretty easy for me to do. After many years of work and raising kids during which I was mostly inactive in hamming, I got pretty rusty. Now at my age, with a little hearing loss, I find it more difficult to get my cw skills back. However, thanks to the ARRL code practice files, I am doing much better. Each night I download several mp3 files from their web site ( http://www.arrl.org/code-practice-files ), and listen to them the next day. After several weeks, I began to notice that "hey, it's coming back". Hope this helps.
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by K4DPK on December 16, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
In learning/using a foreign languange, or in building CW speed, one of the important things you learn is to think in that language.

I've elmered quite a few folks over the years, and they've all told me this helped their CW proficiency the most:

Whenever you can, say, while driving, mowing grass or just walking in the neighborhood or even watching TV, whenever you see a sign, license plate or anything written down....run it through your head as fast as you can.

This gets you started associating letters with Morse characters, and then sharpens the rate at which you do it. That improves both your sending and receiving. You can spend a lot more time doing this than you can practicing when you have to be near a source of CW.

That is one of the most important things you can do to build code speed, and you don't even need a key or an oscillator.

Phil C. Sr.
k4dpk

 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by KV1P on December 20, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
As Nike says Just DO IT!
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by K3ROJ on December 20, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
One way is to listen to other hams chatting or work some of the CW contests. It may take a few times to copy a DX stations call but eventually it will come to you. Sending is always easy once you can receive 20 WPM or more. Many hams during contests use 30 to 45 WPM and at times a call such as XY2ZPQ for example can be frustrating but hang in there. It is now scientifically proven that Morse Code increases your IQ and helps your brain with tasks such as music and even math. In Europe they are starting to teach Morse Code to the visually impaired since it is easier for them to copy code in their head than to fumble with Braile reading. One school in England is using an Italian made key by Begali and transfers text from books to Morse Code onto CD's at 50 WPM. I think the FCC and the ARRL made a big mistake eliminating Morse Code in testing. Perhaps we can have Morse testing again once we have a Ham in charge of the FCC?
 
RE: How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by K6SDW on December 28, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
Ham since the mid-60's ..... I have a suggestion, may be all you hotshot CW OP's slow down once a week and work a newbie CW OP giving them plenty of encouragement, instead of showing off!! .... I'm very fortunate to have been a novice in the 60's where every night there was wall-to-wall CW from 4-5 wpm to infinity ..... now, I hardly ever hear CW traffic on 80 - a lot more on 40 but not enuff QRS traffic. I know it's very discouraging for new hams considering CW not to hear really slow speed traffic so they can practice their speed and break thru the magic 13-wpm barrier.

U guys want to help preserve the CW mode then take the time to Elmer a newbie.

Just me 2 cents - let the flaming begin!
 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by K5RIX on December 30, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
I agree with KE5FRF. Once I got the 5 WPM going OK between my ears, it was useful to listen to W1AW, maritime shore stations, and random traffic/QSO's on the ham bands. After a surprisingly short period of time, I was copying a lot better, and could sort of recognize a "good" fist. Good fists are the ones that are easier to copy! Then just keep after it, making all the QSO's you can. Don't neglect sending skills. Try to mimic the W1AW bulletins, and you cannot go wrong. It's too bad the shore stations are gone, as it was great to copy the mid-ocean weather forecasts and such. Just dig into it and spend some time, and you will be copying 99% of anything you hear before you realize the reality of your brain training!
 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by K5RIX on December 30, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
W8FU made the observation that shore stations no longer operate, and I did not credit that. My apology.
 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by OK1RR on December 31, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
I would prefer off-air method. Use Morse Runner by VE3NEA which is one of the best Windows software, for Linux is an excellent choice the qrq by DJ1YFK. There is a lot of programs to send out a text file in Morse code. Use it to improve your reception skills of an open text into your head. Don't rely on a 'ham text' consisting of abbreviations and Q-signals. To copy and UNDERSTAND the open text is a must. You don't need to copy and remember exactly the text being sent out, to understand is the trick.

Use AC6V links collection and Google. To improve your sending skills, record your practice oscillator to a file. Audacity is the good choice, you can use also a small MP3 player with recording capability.

Why off-air? When attending an event, you are mostly prepared and appropriately dressed. You will probably not go somewhere in dirty oiled pants from your garage. An on-air chat IS an event, so be prepared! There is an ethic dimension, many guys spreading a false presumption that the skilled CW operator is obliged to QRS. Actually, QRS is a goodwill act but not an obligation. Although almost every CW operator is prepared to slow down his speed to an acceptable value, it is quite unfair to decipher someone's call sign at 40 wpm with a decoder and call him at 5 wpm. QRS from 40 to 20 wpm is acceptable but to 5 wpm not! Be considerate, please!

How long you should practice off-air? I believe, you should not leave the software and MP3 player until you master 25 wpm.
 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by K5RIX on December 31, 2010 Mail this to a friend!
OK1RR; spoken like the pure European bureaucrat. I get on frequency and I don't care who studied it. Committees are for under achievers. Make QSO's and enjoy. Neglect the faux guilt trip.
 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by W6TJP on January 5, 2011 Mail this to a friend!
Code Quick that's been around since 1980 has a new product that allows newbies to practice their code just like on the air QSOs. The new program, called Cody Morris, is an adaptation of the A.L.I.C.E. Artificial Intelligence designed by Richard Wallace, Turing Award Winner for Artificial Intelligence. Dr. Wallace says that this use of IA is the most innovative in ten years! (http://www.alicebot.org) The new tool lets you send CQs, exchange info, ask questions, and discuss anything in Morse code from 2.5WPM through 35WPM. The user sets the speed. Realize that you are talking to a machine ham and you will have some fun. Cody can discuss almost all topics and especially ham oriented ones. A great way to learn the Q-signals and be ready for on the air action. http://www.cq2k.com
Jerry Wheeler W6TJP
 
How to Improve Your CW Speed:  
by KB9CFH on January 5, 2011 Mail this to a friend!
Has anyone checked out CwCom ?
It's a program for CW over the internet. It's a deceient program. You might have to get a buddy to talk to the first couple of times because of the amount of usage but if you stay on it people will find you from around the world, some with call signs and some that are just getting into it. It also has had a "NEWSBOT" that sends the news in CW and also some other practice. It's a program that I wish more people intrested in CW would look into because not all of us are able to hang antennas and get on the air.
 
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