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[Articles Home]  [Add Article]  

Zuster Buitehuis-Effect

Frans Mittertreiner (PA0KDW) on August 22, 2012
View comments about this article!

I am a pretty old ham. Not yet reached 100 years of age, that is my next goal, possibly I will be the oldest ham on earth for a short time.

That will prove that RF in the shack is not harmful, just as my aunt Abigale became 103 years old nearly 104, before she died in a traffic accident because her opinion was that everyone has to stop his vehicle for an old woman Dutch crossing the road, and she was smoking each day of her life two 20-pack of cigarettes since she was 27. That was to damp her eagerness mind short after just married, and after that her husband died after exactly 40 years marriage under strange circumstances, which triggered investigation by police, but that investigation just dies out by lack of data to fund their suspicions. She became addicted to the tobacco.

My call sign is PA0KDW, the handle is Frans, the only mode I use is CW, at present they call that A1A, amazing, isn't it? I was a long time QRT due to TVI, but nowadays they made Television digital. And digital is yes or no, one or zero, and hence is far less dependent on intermediate levels, so I can sent again with my old, just as I am, equipment. -- Receiver home brew, 200 Hz wide on 3 dB points and 240 Hz on 60 dB points. All tubes of course. -- Every desirable band available by changing plug-in coils. My proud. Hence not able to receive phone, and nowadays you can listen to phone conversation on youtubedotcom, and I decided that I am missing nothing. -- Nothing at all.

I think right now I am in the position to pass some knowledge of the past to you, young guys, active because just retired, when you are able to receive CW, otherwise I declare that you are not a real radio amateur and I refuse permission to read any further.

So you are a CW guy or you are dishonest. Practice learns that give you the same rights, That is the basic of present-day economy, taxes and what have you.

Well in 1922 radio was just new. The receivers were no heterodyne, but just 0-V-1 or 1-V-1. The gain and selectivity were optimized by feedback. The point of optimum gain and selectivity was very critical, adjusted by hand, and so the set could start oscillating, the carrier you produced was received by others. The howling sound was called Mexican Hound. Probably because nobody knew how a Mexican Hound was howling. When they have any hounds there, because when I should be a Mexican Hound and get their food rests to consume, I should die by consistently refusing or also by eating it. -- And howling during all my short life. You bet.

There was a lady called Zuster Buitenhuis. Zuster means she was a professional care taker for the ill people and Buitenhuis, you have to pronounce as boy ten house. In Dutch it means "outside the house"

Her profession was highly underpaid so the gals were looking for some additional income. And Zuster Buitenhuis throws the ball on supernatural phenomena. She proved for a large audience that people have a magnetic fluid aura with the same properties as electromagnetic waves that pass walls and are invisible. A radio receiver, then new for nearly 100% of the public, was on the podium and adjusted near oscillating. Her hand was obviously detected by a loud howling with different pitch as function of the distance. People were perplexed. Also other people could do the same and a glass of warm water had no effect, this was additional proof that the warmth of their hands couldn't be the reason.

This all was a big show and also were her profits, until a radio technician was in the audience, standing up and explaining her a crook.

From that time on, the familiar hand effect was also named the Zuster Buitenhuis effect, and from about 1950 the effect was extended to indicate all kind of strange phenomena that could not be easily explained, due to side effects in the development of new electronic circuits.

So guys, by now you know what the Zuster Buitenhuis effect means. and what zbe the accompanying CW abbreviation really means.

Frans

Member Comments:
This article has expired. No more comments may be added.
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by K5END on August 22, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Interesting and unique article! Thanks for posting.

_ _ ... ... _ _

 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by F8WBD on August 22, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Curious article, intriguing read.
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by TTOMAS59 on August 22, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Sounds like capacitance effect.
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by AE7UT on August 22, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Bedanked voor dat stukje van historie. Het spijt mij, mijne slechte Nederlands. Maar ik wilde je zeggen dat ik het heel leuk vonde. Ik woonde naar Dilbeek voor een paar jaaren.

Sorry.... bad Dutch but hey I try.

73
Stan AE7UT
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by W2MV on August 22, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Dank U zeer!

Alan, W2MV
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by KE6EE on August 22, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Beautiful tale, so well-told.
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by K8QV on August 22, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
"I think right now I am in the position to pass some knowledge of the past to you, young guys, active because just retired, when you are able to receive CW, otherwise I declare that you are not a real radio amateur and I refuse permission to read any further."


Wow! Americans aren't allowed to say something like that - it would be politically incorrect, regardless of any truth. Neither can we admit people can smoke and still live! You're a wild man!!! Thank you!

Very nice article.
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by AE5QB on August 22, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
I'm sorry, language barrier not withstanding, is there a point to this article? I have no clue what he is trying to say. Is this a no-code bashing or is there something deeper to what appears to me to be pointless ramblings?

I would say from the lack of responses, and I may be incorrect, that a whole lot of other readers are in a fog as well.

If someone can summarize this article in one or two sentences, I'd appreciate it.

73,

Tom
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by AB9TA on August 22, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
OoooKay, what the heck was THAT all about?

"...when you are able to receive CW, otherwise I declare that you are not a real radio amateur ... So you are a CW guy or you are dishonest..."

Oh wait, it makes sense now, the confused and aimless doddering from a follower of the ancient Cult of Obsolescence, i.e., Morose Code, i.e., Cretaceous Wave.

"Zipyer Buttinthehouse-Effect", Indeed!

Best Regards from the 21st Century..
73!
Bill AB9TA
 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by KE5JPP on August 22, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
CW... so 1900's

Gene
 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by WX7G on August 22, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
CW forever.
 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by AD5ZC on August 22, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
I didn't read it since I was not allowed permission??
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by WB4LCN on August 22, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
"That's the way it was, AND WE LIKED IT!"
 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by K8QV on August 22, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
It's interesting how the newcomers to the hobby often opine that the old timers don't mentor them. Then every time an old timer tries to Elmer them by showing them the value of CW and the bond it creates, how hard work makes the ticket something of value, how actually knowing your craft and its history are things that give it lasting value - they are decried as Luddites, snobs, and out of touch fools. I guess the old, experienced hams should stick to teaching the newbies how the 2 meter xcvr PTT works and where the best deals are on the latest computers and orange vests.
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by AA4Q on August 22, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
I'm pretty sure the 1 to 2 sentence summary is:

"The capacitance effect of your hand destabilizing a regenerative receiver is hereby nicknamed the "Zuster Buitenhuis Effect". And here's the story why."



AA4Q


 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by K5END on August 23, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
K8QV, you nailed it and said it well.

73

 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by W5GNB on August 23, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Yea!! I read it as
"Without CW, it's just CB"

Very interesting and Criptic article.... THANKS for the challenge of interpretation.... HIHI....
 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by W4KVU on August 23, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
"Without CW, it's just CB"
Bingo
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by KF4LVC on August 23, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Very interesting article! It makes me think that this could have been how the theremin was first conceived.
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by TTOMAS59 on August 23, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
lets have a food fight
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by N1DVJ on August 23, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
"otherwise I declare that you are not a real radio amateur and I refuse permission to read any further"

Sounds like a lid to me...
 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by NX6C on August 23, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Wisdom handed out for free. Excellent!
I particularly like the;
"
... otherwise I declare that you are not a real radio amateur and I refuse permission to read any further.
So you are a CW guy or you are dishonest. Practice learns that give you the same rights, That is the basis of present-day economy, taxes and what have you.
"
Thank You!
Ted
NX6C

 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by N8CMQ on August 23, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Depends on your age/experience level.
It reminds me of when I was a young boy, and the adults would say I would understand when I got older...
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by AI7RR on August 23, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Live long and prosper, Frans.

73, Roger
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by VE8NX on August 23, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
So, what's the dutch word for "troll"?

 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by PA5MW on August 24, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
it is: "respectloze canadees"
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by KB4QAA on August 24, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Thanks Frans, it's nice to hear the perspectives and history from other countries! Bill
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by K9CTB on August 24, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
I love it when the codeless extras come out of the woodwork because they think someone took a swipe at 'em.

Personally, I think taking the code and written exams in front of an FCC examiner is the only *real* way to become a ham. I say that because I had to do it.

I think an honest General ticket, as earned by the above method is far more valid than any codeless multiple-choice extra "test" that you get all the answers to from a $10.00 book, anyway ;-p

73,
k9ctb
 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by N1DVJ on August 24, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Well, I'm not a codeless extra, but I'll still say the guys a lid.

And for your info, over my ham career, or whatever you want to call it, I've had 4 Swans that have seen NOTHING but straight key inserted into the things. Ok, ONE of them I DID plug in a mic just to see if it worked, but I never worked a contact with it.

Ham radio is changing. CW is a neat mode that can be a lot of fun, but it's past it's time, and it's role as a necessary skill is long gone.

Don't malign CW, but don't worship at the alter of a god that is long gone...

If you want to brag, show me some technical skill, not that you can shake your wrist in front of someone at a specific speed.
 
Zuster Buitenhuis-Effect  
by PA0LPS on August 24, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Nice article, describing an aspect of radio history that is not generally known.
FYI, a PA0-prefix indicates that Frans obtained his license before 1975.
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by N1KDO on August 24, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
This effect was utilized to great effect (ha!) by one Leon Theremin, who's strange instrument bears his name to this day. I'm glad they don't call it the "Zuster Buitehuis", because Theremin is already hard enough to pronounce.
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by K9CTB on August 24, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Ah ... no offense, Mike. I'm not even an extra of any type. But I can see from the comments that there are some of them here. Just a tongue-in-cheek jab at 'em, I guess. I had to EARN my 13 w.p.m certificate in a REAL FCC office -- something I'm rather proud of, along with the thousands of others who did the same thing.

73,
K9CTB
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by N7KFD on August 24, 2012 Mail this to a friend!

I had to pass a 13 wpm code test, it was at a VEC session. Do I use CW, sometimes. Do I use the mic that came with my rig, sometimes. I also use and enjoy digital modes. My point is, what difference does it make? Is it really about what mode you use to make contacts and new friends? I operate from 2 meters to 80 meters and enjoy just about everyone I talk to no matter what mode.

Perhaps we should concentrate our efforts on getting more people to be radio operators rather than radio owners. Key up and say "Hi" to someone, mode doesn't matter, band doesn't matter. Just have fun!
 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by KW6LA on August 24, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
I do think both sides have a point here. We donít start our cars with a crank anymore and the digital technology is amazing ! Case and point, we old timers got hosed when the FCC
thru out Morse the bath water and gave NOTHING in return. So the newbieís, please see our point ! CW is an acquired skill and one must be very dedicated and disciplined to master
it. It has been a tradition in Ham radio since the very beginning and those that have used Morse Code are very proud of their achievement. Now digital / or PSK - - is wonderful technology
but hard to find a lot of skill and tradition in using macros. To each their own, but maybe one day the no-code Extras will see the point when they let CBerís use AM in their spectrum.

KW6LA / T2

 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by K8QV on August 25, 2012 Mail this to a friend!


"Ham radio is changing. CW is a neat mode that can be a lot of fun, but it's past it's time, and it's role as a necessary skill is long gone."


Past its time? Technically speaking, ham radio in general is past its time. Oil painting is not 'past its time' simply because digital photography was invented. Equestrian endeavor is not 'past its time' even though the automobile is with us today. All of amateur radio is an antiquated relic when compared to modern communication technology. It's a hobby, like knitting or shooting muzzle loaders. None of the aforementioned pastimes are 'necessary skills' but they are still fun to do.

 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by N1DVJ on August 25, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Ham radio still has lots of life, but CW isn't gonna be anywhere near the driving force or the metric by which it is judged.

Yeah, there are a lot of people still stuck in the past, but then look at classic cars, history re-enactments, and old fairs.

But just because I like old guns doesn't mean I can't have an AR15. Just because I list Vincent or Arial doesn't mean I can have a new Honda or Kawasaki. My favorite car in my life was one of the 1968 Mustangs I owned years ago. Now I have a new one.

I have to admit though that I am irked by those that use the past to insist it remain the metric for modern evaluation. I can do slow CW, and while I admire the skill of a 25wpm operator, I think that same operator is an ass when he looks down on a newbie just because he can't do cw. Can that high speed operator design a PLL with dual modulus pre-scaler? Can the operator make a POCSAG encoder? Can that operator even begin to understand how to make a PIC microcontroller take the place the place of a diode array of an old Icom radio they picked up at a yard sale?

Unfortunately a LOT of them are like I said. They look down on others that don't have that one specific skill. And it's a skill that is no longer an important metric in the hobby.

The real shame of this whole situation is that CW is fun. Those that take the small amount of time involved to just get a basic introduction usually find it's extremely addicting. Unfortunately the attitude some of the operators take as previously pointed out totally kills any chance of introducing CW to these newbies. They'd rather do without than enter in the conflict with the 'old farts' who they feel are just going to die off anyway.
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by KB4XV on August 25, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Re K9CTB- You are right. I have taken test at the FCC office and at Ve sessions. The stress level at the FCC office was about 100 times stronger than at the VE session.
 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by N0SYA on August 25, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
As they say over there; sempty tree!
 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by K0RS on August 25, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Unbelievable. A guys writes a humorous article and a bunch of paranoid lids immediately turn it into a pro/anti CW argument. Will you guys who are too stupid or lazy to learn CW please drop your specious lines of reasoning? Get over your small...er..."member" syndrome.

The FCC dropped the CW requirement. Do you still not get it? You won. You have your "super CB" and you're still not happy.
 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by K8QV on August 25, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
You know, not every old timer stuck with CW as their mode of choice. Many abandoned it in favor of AM, SSB, or VHF experimentation or something else. The real value of Morse Code and CW operation as a requirement for all hams was the common bonding experience of it. Mastering (or just getting through) the code requirement was an accomplishment that every ham shared. It literally made it a brotherhood (sisters included, too!). Every member of the amateur radio community had something in common with the others.

CW is not the best mode for every purpose, and some simply don't like to use it. Nevertheless, it served a larger purpose. If for some reason people are unable to learn code anymore, perhaps we should find some other common requirement that all hams can share as one group; memorizing the correct multiple choice answers to a few questions just doesn't do it. We need another common accomplishment we can share. Unfortunately, I see the FCC set on a path to eventually eliminate any special knowledge or skill in order to obtain operating privileges.
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by PA0BLAH on August 25, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
PA5MV: ROFHI

There is a typo in the title I suppose, the name was Buitenhuis as said in the text.

The lady actually invented the Theremin.

Bob 30
 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by LA9XSA on August 26, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
The article "Not Your Typical Story...Or So I Think" by K1DDN and "Zuster Buitehuis-Effect" by PA0KDW seem to me to be perfect companions to each other. About equally well written, with completely opposite perspectives. Uploading them both to the same server could have led to reaction akin to matter meeting anti-matter, but unfortunately not.
 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by W8AAZ on August 26, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
I still don't understand why hams take the forum articles to heart and get insulted or spend an inordinate amount of time criticising the writers on here. Not like they are getting payed to write something that sticks in your craw, or at least you think it does. Or taking someones suggestion writings and picking them apart technically and calling them an idiot or such. Reminds me of the battles between loudmouths and jammers on 75M. In which case I turn the dial or the switch, not jumping in the fray.
 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by N1DVJ on August 28, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Well, just read what he said:

"you are able to receive CW, otherwise I declare that you are not a real radio amateur and I refuse permission to read any further"

I can honestly say that if he said that to my face I'd respond with something rhymed with "Duck You!" And I'd be pretty darn loud and adamant how I said it, right back in his face.

But he further goes on to say:

"So you are a CW guy or you are dishonest"

Call me dishonest? I'll call him a crazy old fart that belongs to retire from the ranks of ham radio. He has no place among modern hams. Yep, that's my opinion, but I think it's far less controversial that directly and openly calling other 'not a real ham' or flatly declaring them to be dishonest.

How did the rest of you put up with the garbage this guy spewed out? Did you really read it? Or did you just pass it by and with the justification that he's just and old and harmless ham?
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by NU1O on August 30, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
A refreshing article. Nice to see somebody speak his mind without worrying about the PC police. Society has become overly polite due to political correctness and it makes life boring.

Thanks for explaining ZBE and nice to see an article from outside the USA.
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by PA0BLAH on August 31, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Hahahaha,

I know the writer personally, he is living in an elderly people ressort right now, and once in a year I visit and meet him personally in an eye ball QSO.

He is an unbelievable bright guy, as far as I - feeling a dumbo compared with him - can see, and he (for example) is still programming with his nearly blind eyes in VHDL the latest fpga's on evaluation boards, showing me what he wrought with his mind. It makes me baffled.

You guys, insofar humiliating him, which is in fact creating a label on yourself
not on him, you have to look up in wikipedia and google (VHDL, FPGA) what he is doing while you are spelling out the CW characters in phone with your alfa bravo charlie foxtrot.

CU in CW (nil agn hi)

 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by N1DVJ on August 31, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
He may be VERY intelligent. And if he's still doing arrays and programming after retirement, more power to him. In fact, if I were able, I'd probably like to meet him.

I can respect what he is in that regard, and even admire it to a certain extent.

But I've mean people in the computer industry that are absolutely brilliant, and I admire their engineering skills, but I still think they are social or moral idiots for some of the stands they take on issues.

And that's about where I place your friend with the attitude about 'real' hams and calling people dishonest.

But then, he (and you) are free to think the same of me. Go right ahead.
 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by PA0BLAH on August 31, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
OK, thanks for your fast comment.

Well I think you are basically right, There is a significant correlation between the way people (miss)behave social and the grade of brightness.

I think there are two reasons for that:

1. When you are feeble (not mentally strong) you have to behave yourself social in a group in order to survive, it will at time become a second nature.

2. You alienate from social interaction because you experience people as stupid, playing their standard records as vocal interaction, that they basically do not understand. (Talking like a chicken without head, translation of Dutch proverb)

Finally remark: it is the task of a nation to explore the talents of their inhabitants to the utmost, in order to survive and not becoming in slavery of other nations, as shown in the long long human history.
Slavery can be physical, that is past history, but also economical (that is a fact the case nowadays) by paying low wages and importing goods for ridiculous low prices compared with your own wages, leaving te producers no way out of this economic slavery.
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by PA0BLAH on August 31, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
I wrote "no way out of this slavery."

But there is: Keep producing at low cost and living in poverty, Do not change the value of your money, develop yourself as country, invest your earnings in engineering education. You will finally kill in that way the high tech industry of the rich country, mining, aircrafts, shipbuilding, electronics, civil engineering, and after that the educational institutes that produced the required engineers in that country, because freshman don't flow in when they can't finally get a job after their education.
Those rich countries keep buying imported products that they can't make anylonger by themself, and you as poor nation invest the earned money, before it inflates, in the core business like banks, and infrastructure of the rich country.

That is what is happening right now.

Do you not believe that? Then your eyes are closed.
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by KF7PCL on August 31, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Let me start that I am licensed as a no-code extra but learned CW on my own and I have QSL cards to prove it.

"I think right now I am in the position to pass some knowledge of the past to you, young guys, active because just retired, when you are able to receive CW, otherwise I declare that you are not a real radio amateur and I refuse permission to read any further."

I feel this comment is inappropriate. It indicates that the writer of the article is likely a snob.

Even supposing I did not know code, how could you "refuse" me from reading the article? For what its worth, I didn't even see that sentence the first time I read the article because I usually jump alittle further down to find out what the core of the article is about and I would be willing to bet many other readers do the same.

I only noticed this absurd sentence after reading the comments after the argument. And the only thing more disturbing then the original non-sense remark is some of the other commentators that agreed with it.

Also please explain what knowing CW has to do with honesty?

Remember if we do not get more people in amateur radio, it WILL die out.
 
Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by KF7PCL on August 31, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
Note the last post was not intended to insult the intelligence of the original poster.

He seems very intelligent and the comment from PA0BLAH claiming that he programs FPGAs at that age is very impressive.

I program microcontrollers as well as PCs but have limited experience with Field Programmable Gate Arrays.

I also agree that RF is not harmful considering how many hams make it to 80+ years of age. Infact I think maybe either the RF itself or the interaction with other people may help extend the lifespan of hams.

This still does not give him permission to make broad statements like this.
 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by AC7CW on September 18, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
My first rxvr was a regen. I had an audio filter externally and besides that I had DSP. The DSP was between my ears though. I recall listening to noise and faint signals until I nearly passed out at times, such fatigue, I think I might have worked stations that weren't really there sometimes... I do recall doing some work in the radio and leaving something ungrounded. The hand capacitance effect was awful, I had to fix that before even thinking of trying to get on the air.
 
RE: Zuster Buitehuis-Effect  
by KC9UUU on October 3, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
I am not sure if I understood your message but I have a hearing problem and use a reader to help me with the code because of my hearing. So is that you think being dishonest is? I happen to be 70 years old a long tine
interested in Amateur Radio and I think if your interested you should use all the things that will help
you to enjoy your hobby. That's why I think that
the help you get from your friendly Elmer is what makes
this a great hobby.
If I miss understood I am sorry.

Ron
 
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