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FCC Reduces New Jersey Ham's Forfeiture from $20,000 to $16,000:

from The ARRL Letter on December 13, 2012
Website: http://www.arrl.org/
View comments about this article!

FCC Reduces New Jersey Ham's Forfeiture from $20,000 to $16,000:

After unsuccessfully appealing to the FCC to cancel his $20,000 forfeiture, Joaquim Barbosa, N2KBJ, of Elizabeth, New Jersey must pay $16,000 for "willfully and repeatedly violating Section 301 of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended by operating a radio transmitting equipment on the frequency 296.550 MHz without Commission authorization."

The FCC noted in the Forfeiture Order that based on the examination process involved in pursuing an amateur license, "amateur licensees are expected to have an understanding of radio operations and pertinent FCC regulations, including Part 97 of the FCC's rules governing the Amateur Radio Service. Licensed amateur operators know that they are authorized to operate only on the frequencies listed in Section 97.301 of the rules, as designated by their operator class and license. Pursuant to the Table of Allocations, the 267-322 MHz band -- the band that Barbosa was operating in -- is allocated solely for federal government use, which we continue to believe Barbosa knew (or should have known) was not authorized for non-government use." Read more here http://www.arrl.org/news/fcc-finds-new-jersey-ham-violated-communication-act-reduces-forfeiture-from-20-000-to-16-000.

Source:

The ARRL Letter

Member Comments:
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FCC Reduces New Jersey Ham's Forfeiture from $20,000 to $16,  
by W6EM on December 16, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
And, just what was this guy doing on a UHF military frequency? The article doesn't say, but he was probably using a US military satellite UHF repeater. Apparently, a very popular activity in Brazil. Lots of it going on, I hear.

Seems to me, I remember a federal statute that makes it a federal crime, a felony, I think, to interfere with US government communications. Perhaps using a satellite repeater might be construed that way, especially if the US military owners couldn't use it while this guy and his Brazillian friends were using it.

I guess he wasn't accused of that, but could very easily have been.

Guess he won't be receiving his amateur license renewal anytime soon.
 
FCC Reduces New Jersey Ham's Forfeiture from $20,000 to $16,  
by AB9TA on December 16, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
I don't understand why they reduced the amount at all.. It's not like this is some sort of gray area, or I-stumbled-a-little-over-the-band-edge type of things..
He deserves the full amount just for committing Aggrivated Knuckleheadedness..
Hams should stay firmly in the ham bands!!!!

73!
Bill AB9TA
 
RE: FCC Reduces New Jersey Ham's Forfeiture from $20,000 to  
by KA2FIR on December 19, 2012 Mail this to a friend!
These PY/W hams in my area have 2 meters and 440 littered with crossband repeaters. I remember years ago they were on a repeater input causing interference. I emailed the guy but he ignored me. I think it's time for the NY field office to shutdown these illegal operations. I'm sure he was using FLTSAT-8. Come to think of it I bet he was uplinking the local crap I hear on 2/440. Go home.
 
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