eHam.net - Amateur Radio (Ham Radio) Community

Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net



[Articles Home]  [Add Article]  

160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces

Peter Kelleher (KC1SS) on January 20, 2013
View comments about this article!

There are as many variations of a 160 meter antenna as there are favorite frequencies! I have been hunting for the "right" antenna for the Top Band for a long time and to-date, I haven't found it.

What I have found is good, sound advice on the 160 meter skyhook that one needs to incorporate in an effective system. I set out to find an antenna that works (for me!).

I read McCoy, Demaw, Hare, Lau, Turrin, Orr and a host of other knowledgeable, experienced hams on the topic of getting our signals on the air. I also referenced the Forum article "160 meter Inverted L, Welcome to Winter" found here on the eHam.net site.

I came away with the three basic items needed for a good antenna: A feedline, coupler and wire. The feed line I used is coax, the coupler is a 1:1 balun and the wire is a 1/4 wavelength longwire.

The coax was desired to make the connection between the radio and the wire easy and contained, the balun was to keep the currents on the wire antenna and not on the coax and the wire length was what I had room to string up.

I did learn that the wire antenna requires a counterpoise to "work against", since the height of the 160 meter antenna is so very close to the ground in a typical urban residential lot. Driving a ground rod into the earth isn't the solution, since the earth is a poor conductor of RF.

I used two 143 foot counterpoises at 4 feet off the ground, separated by about 100 feet apart. The antenna is 130 feet long at about 30 feet off the ground. What I came away with is a nice, simple, functional antenna for 160 meters.

Pete KC1SS
KC1SS@localnet.com

Member Comments:
This article has expired. No more comments may be added.
 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by W4II on January 20, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Pete....

It was nice of you to post information regarding your antenna. For those who may be interested, you might clarfiy how the 130' long wire and counterpoise is configured. You refer to it as a long wire, but also reference an article on an inverted L. I'm guessing some folks are attempting to visualize how/where you connected the feed-line, common mode choke, and counterpoise to the "long wire". Or, is it simply an inverted L for 160m, using two elevated radials and fed at the bottom via the common mode choke? Most folks consider a true long wire to be at least a full wavelength long at the lowest frequency.

73 John W4II
 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by W4II on January 20, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Pete....

I see that you have a diagram posted on your QRZ.com page for those who are interested.

John W4II
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by K9MHZ on January 20, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
This belongs in the Forums section. No graphical depictions and a very incomplete description of your setup. Hardly an article, and unsatisfactory to say the least.


 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by N7KFD on January 20, 2013 Mail this to a friend!

Pete -

Thanks for sharing, not everyone needs pictures and details to understand what you're talking about. I've never worked 160 Meters mainly because I didn't have a yard big enough for an antenna but I might take a good look at your idea in the spring.

Jim
N7KFD
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KE6SLS on January 20, 2013 Mail this to a friend!

Not to be too picky, but a 130' of wire isn't a "long wire" for the top band. Random wire yes, long wire no.

73 om
 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KD0ACY on January 20, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
being a beginner I for one find you post great and am glad I found it.
Mike
 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by N8XI on January 21, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
You know Pete, I have never seen a design like this for a 160M antenna.
Experimenting and finding something that works for you, IMO, IS Amateur Radio!!

I am sure all the naysayers have found new ways to get on the air (NOT!)

I am using one of the "common" antenna designs for 160M :)

If I had the room I would try your design.

Thanks for explaining!!
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KC1SS on January 21, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Thank you for all the feedback on my post. I did include a diagram when I submitted the article. I don't know why it was not included in this posting, but I will look into it and see if I can get it updated. I do have it included in my QRZ.com listing. You may view it there until I figure out how to include it here.
http://www.qrz.com/db/KC1SS


73,
Pete KC1SS
 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by NZ4O on January 21, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
I think that from and RFI issue due to imbalance you would be better off with a simple dipole configuration.
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by W4VR on January 21, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
It's a cloud warmer, but at least it gets you on 160.
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KC1SS on January 21, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
I used the term Lonwire as a common name for the Random Wire antenna. Please refer to the website reference, below.


http://www.w8ji.com/long_wire_antenna.htm

73, Pete KC1SS
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KC1SS on January 21, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Hi, John,

Thank you for your feedback. I used the term loosely when I referred to the Longwire. What I did was take several different concepts of the 160 meter antenna and blended them to this design. I really don't know what one would call this. It is not an inverted "L", not a longwire, not a dipole, not a loop.....

I simply used many suggestions from various sources and I came up with this! It is more like a Lazy Lower-case "l" antenna, HI HI! I tune it with an antenna tuner at the radio. I get great reports from 800 miles away (Ohio/Vermont) and I use 100 Watts of power. I had such great success, I wanted to share it with others.

73, Pete KC1SS
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by AF6AU on January 21, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Be interesting if on a no wind night you hoisted that 130 foot radiator straight up with a weather balloon. Now you would have a 1/4 wave vertical. Too bad you have to keep that radiator only 30 feet off the ground.

JML AF6AU
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by N6AJR on January 21, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
What I have done recently is to buy "real" christmas trees each year and plant the in the back yary. as thes grow and get taller I have some great antenna supports in "perfect" position for a dipole or 3. and they cost about as much as a throw away tree.
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by N6AJR on January 21, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
yard
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by N4JTE on January 21, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Thank you for sharing, the qrz page diagram helped a lot.
Elegant solution for finding room for 160 band, as said, it's not gonna be pile up buster but neither are most 160 antennas, have fun with it and keep us posted on the results you achieve.
Regards,
Bob
 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KT4EP on January 21, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
It works for him, that's what matters. I viewed his qrz page diagram, also.
Tx for sharing this article Pete.
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by N3WAK on January 21, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Pete--Thanks for posting this antenna idea. I use an inverted L antenna for 160, fed with good coax about 60' long to an RF choke at the base; my 1/4 wave antenna is only 40' high sloping to 32', and I have 50+ crooked radials of varying length. My SWR is about 2:1 to 3.5:1, which I adjust with a tuner in the shack. At 160m, the loss in my coax is still very small. Your antenna works for you...and mine works for me. Antenna experimentation is sure lots of fun!

For the naysayers out there, like K9MHZ--why don't you cut Pete some slack? If you want photographs, or diagrams, or a longer, more detailed article--why don't you write the one you'd have liked to read? My feeling is that instead of criticizing, you should come up with the solution. Writing an article for the rest of us to enjoy would do just that.

One of these days, even I intend to write an article. The one I want to write is "Homebrew a Wire Antenna--a Primer for New Hams." So, that topic is already taken!

Thanks again, Pete. 73, Tony
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by W1JKA on January 22, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Re:N3WAK
Along with Pete go ahead and write your article anyway.K9MHZ aside, there are more than one of us that would be interested in such no matter where it is posted.
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by WB7TXG on January 22, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
So glad the antenna is working for you on 160..Experimenting is what makes ham radio so neat.. My 160 OCF is not supposed to work according to some experts.. However, it works just fine much to my delight..

Encourage you to continue to share your experiences and findings with others .. Hope to hear you on the bands some day..

WB7TXG 73
 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KB1GEJ on January 22, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
I have wanted to try 160 for a long time now, but I can't help wondering what the reward would be for committing the resources and time to put up a 45' high Inverted L powered by 100 watts. Isn't 160 like 75, where one rarely hears a CQ and most QSO are roundtables of OFs who have known each other since the flood? Is CW good enough for me to dust off the brass implement and give it a try?
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by K9MHZ on January 22, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
>>>>by N3WAK on January 21, 2013
For the naysayers out there, like K9MHZ--why don't you cut Pete some slack? If you want photographs, or diagrams, or a longer, more detailed article--why don't you write the one you'd have liked to read? My feeling is that instead of criticizing, you should come up with the solution. Writing an article for the rest of us to enjoy would do just that.

Thanks again, Pete. 73, Tony

RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces Reply
by W1JKA on January 22, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Re:N3WAK
Along with Pete go ahead and write your article anyway.K9MHZ aside, there are more than one of us that would be interested in such no matter where it is posted.<<<<





I think you guys are making my point. I too wanted to see Pete's idea. When technical articles are written in industry and for ham magazines, there is absolutely a format/protocol of how it's to be written and what's to be included. NO this isn't either of those, but at least show something to the reader, and if not, then just post it in one of the many topics in the Forums section.

Sorry if I came across as heavy-handed, but I wouldn't have called it "naysaying"....I wanted to see what Pete had to show us.

Looks like Pete later added that he had trouble posting some of the diagrams, etc. Understandable.

Best,
Brad, K9MHZ

 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by N4JTE on January 22, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Eham articles is a very tricky place for antenna articles, tough crowd, been there did that many times.
I have lost a very important diagram or illustration from what I submitted on occasion to what shows up.
Plenty of referances to his QRZ page for diagram to explain his design.
His compromise design is EXACTLEY what he stated in his title and I found his solution to his situation very usuable and important info for the 160 experimenter.
Bob
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KD5FOY on January 24, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Thanks for taking the time and effort to explain your antenna setup. Experimenting is a major part of ham radio to a lot of us.
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by K9MHZ on January 24, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
You've got to give Pete a lot of credit for at least trying to post about something productive and positive.

Contrast that with the earlier ridiculous topic of paranormals on ham radio, or that "rock star" hipster girl in Pueblo, Colorado who's a new ham and was announcing herself on here looking for a fan club or something.

Never a dull moment.

 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by TTOMAS59 on January 24, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Do the counterpoises run in the same general directions as the antenna wire or or in the opposite direction? Thanks
 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by TTOMAS59 on January 24, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Also why not use a 9:1 unun for impedance matching to the coax?
 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by TTOMAS59 on January 24, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Don't you want a 130 ft antenna to work on multiple bands? That's why the unun for matching purposes.
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KC1SS on January 25, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Take a look at my QRZ.COM page. The longwire runs through the center of my backyard. The counterpoises run below the longwire, in the same direction, separated by 100 feet (50 feet to each side of the longwire).

I simply wanted to isolate the antenna from the coax and this is why I used the 1:1 balun. I suppose one can try a 9:1, too!

73, Pete KC1SS
 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by W4DSN on January 25, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Paul -

I have a similar antenna. It is about 143' in an inverted V, the pivot point being about 30' above ground, and about 1/4 of the way. (I tried to make the angle close to 90 degrees.) The wire is Home Depot #14. Note that the antenna is really a 1/4 wave, not a random wire or a long wire. If everything is cut right, it is resonant.

My counterpoise is a single wire about 150' long, running on the ground directly under the inverted V. I trimmed it for minimum SWR. It is under 2:1 SWR from about 1.750 to 1.875 Mhz. I get great signal reports, especially when I use my Drake L7. It takes 1 KW with no problem. I do not use a tuner, don't believe in them! Tune the antenna, not the coax and you will be happy with the result.

I am not sure why you have the two counterpoises? I think one would be enough, but I would be interested in hearing if you arrived at this through experimentation. I also wonder if elevating them 4' is necessary.
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KC1SS on January 26, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Hi, Paul,

Well, the time I had to install the antenna was limited, so I followed an old sage's advice: put up as much wire as you can and leave it alone! That is how I got the 130 feet of wire in the air. As I read various articles, I was seeing lots of text dedicated to "as many radials as you can". Well, I had a fence surrounding an area that my three dogs love to play in, so I simply placed the radials on top to the wooden fence. As far as any technical reason for anything I did, it was more the "practice of the art" than anything else. As you may be aware, many think of electronics as an "art" rather than a "science". So, there you have it; I simply took all that I read and came up with this antenna. Restating what I said originally, there are as many antenna ideas as there are favorite frequencies!

73 and Good DX,

Pete KC1SS
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by W4DSN on January 26, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Pete -

Sorry for the confusion on the name! That is what I love about antenna building, you get better results through experimentation than calculation! What you did was totally logical, you used what was there and it worked. I took a different approach and got similar results. Hopefully, somebody will take what you did and what I did and come up with even a better idea.

Good work, thanks!

Gene
W4DSN
 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KA6WKE on January 27, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Excellent idea for a top band antenna. I don't have as much linear space as you do so I use my 40M loop with a L-match tuner. It fits in a standard suburban lot. You can read about the configuration here: http://www.ka6wke.net/l-match
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by EI4KE on January 28, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Perhaps you could write us a little article on what antenna you use on 160m? A diagram / measurements and an a-z book of instructions would also be usefull for those of us who are a little slow in the brain department.....
Personaaly I use a 135' doublet for all bands, on 160m I join both ends of the 450 ohm feeder to one leg of the palstar, join the station rf earth to the other and let fly,,,, 400 watts ,, no rf in the shack ,,,,,,, some rf out to europe,,hi,,..... not very efficient but gets me out ..... 50 odd countries on a band I rarely use,,,,,,
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by EI4KE on January 28, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
The above post was in reply to K9mhz and to all other nay sayers on the forum,,,,, thanks for the article and gl gd dx 73 Seamus
 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by K2JX on January 29, 2013 Mail this to a friend!

Hi Pete,

Good article, I use a similiar random wire, long wire what ever and it works well on top band. Mine is 100 feet long, fed through DX Engineering's end fed wire balun by a short length of RG-213U to my station tuner. I drove an 8'copper ground rod below the Balun for static drain and lightning protection. I don't use a counterpoise. My lot is 50 X 150, 100' feet above sea level which for Long Isand is somewhat high.

I have no RFI and the wire loads up easily with the tuner. I am a long time Ham and back in my early days we'd strip the wire from a TV set "fly back" and use that for antennas, putting as much wire up as space allowed. Then connect the end directly into my Johnson Viking Adventurer, no tuner. Hundreds of us "kids" worked other Hams with a basic set up as described in the late 60's. The only set back was Channel 2 TV which was wiped out by TVI, so I stayed QRT during TV times !

But the end result is if your installation works for you using what you have to work with really is the essence of amateur radio. Have fun maybe I'll hear you on 160 sometime.

73/de K2JX
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KB2CPW on January 29, 2013 Mail this to a friend!

The gentleman (thank you BTW) posts an antenna which gets him on 160 and it works. Why must the "usual suspects" come along and kick him in the N@ds with stupid or pedantic comments. Try the antenna, you might learn something.. Otherwise post your self designed antenna so we can kick you back..
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by W5WSS on January 30, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Kc1ss Hello, Your antenna is a Horizontal wire antenna.

The length that you are using is closer to a resistive radiation, non inductive match for a range of the band.

The radials are a better than Earth surface place for rf to complete this antenna which is end fed.

One radial directly underneath the antenna wire will perform the function.

One can elevate the far end upwards slope and fine tune the match.

The 1:1 current Balun and coaxial cable is an excellent choice for this application Provided the antenna cable in the un matched zone is held to a lessor loss condition for example a remote tuner located at the tuner would serve the function.

You can press this system into multi band service being mindful of Tuner settings and avoiding the halfwave lengths.

Enjoy the nice design 73

 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by W5WSS on January 30, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
A tuner located at the antenna feed point meant to say.
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by W5WSS on January 30, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Also I would leave the radial/s isolated from the earth surface using non conductive anchors this greatly reduces common mode noise ingress because it helps the system balance,and I would definetly apply a wander lead and earthing rod along with a strain releif between the antenna wire and the equipment.
The wander lead should be connected to the antenna wire outside the shack and redirect any static electricity spikes and for thunderstorm potential.
 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by W1EMQ on February 2, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Interesting article, but except for the length of a full-size wire for 160, these measurements do not seem for "limited space" suburban lots unless the wires have a jog or two. I live on a 100x200 foot lot but do not have a clear 143' run let alone space to run counterpoise wires 4' off the ground. (On a former 50x100 suburan lot I did string an 80m dipole but with bends at the ends to get it to fit). I'm considering building W6SAI's 20' 160m vertical, which is wire wound 10 turns to the inch on 4" diameter PVC, topped with a 4' circular wire mesh capacitive "hat," and a minimum of four small radials. I've never been on 160 in 55 years of hamming, so ANY antenna - wire or vertical - that would work on Top Band would be fine with me.
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KC1SS on February 3, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Hi, Charles,
Thank you for your comments. I do not have the 143 foot radials/counterpoises in a straight line. What I learned from my reading of the named authors is to put up "what-you-can" "where-you-can"! I have learned over the years that antennas do not need to be straight or symmetrical. It is ideal to have the wires high, straight and cut to the desired lengths, but this is ham radio. There are no hard/fast rules if you can get on the air and enjoy our hobby.
73,
Pete KC1SS
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by N1BHH on February 3, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
I for one, would have gone with just a plain old ordinary dipole, which in reality your antenna is, with an extra wire. I think you complicated your installation a bit too much. Two pieces of wire, 130 feet each, one on each terminal of the balun going off in different directions would suffice.

You don't have to make them straight, they can be bent in many shapes, "Z", "Y" but the classic "T" shaped flat top dipole works well.

With a 1:1 balun you don't need "counterpoises" because the dipole with two equal amounts of wire is a balanced antenna. And as high as is practicable is the best place for it.
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by K9MHZ on February 4, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
It looks all he had to work with was approx. 130/140 feet in one direction (?), which would preclude opposing dipole legs. I'm just wondering if those "counterpoises" drove the takeoff angle more vertically than with a conventional dipole?

 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KC1SS on February 4, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Brad,

Thank you for your feedback. I have had a couple of reply posts stating I should have had a dipole instead of my design, but I think they missed my point. I do have a dipole elsewhere on my property that is 130 feet overall and it will not play well on 160 meters. This is exactly why I decided to try the 130 foot wire and the 143 foot counterpoises below it. If I had the space, of course I would put up a dipole, but my original statement was I didn't have room for anything other than this design.

73,
Pete KC1SS
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by K9MHZ on February 4, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Well, I'm envious of your 143 foot space. Man, I need to move.

 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by YL2TF on February 10, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
N3WAK, get a real license, amateur extra given away at the cost of processing fee of $15. Now, long wire by definition starts at 3 lambda, at approx. 5 it folds on itself, thus described antenna can be called truncated vertical at the most, since sum of vectors will produce some kind of angled semi-vertical radiator with counterpoise system.
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KF7VXA on February 15, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Interesting post. I have never thought about even working 160 due to the lengths of wire involved, but you tried something different and are making contacts, good for you !

Can't see why some always have to find something wrong with everything unless they have done it themselves, just the way the world is. You keep running wire and having fun while some others spend hours trying to figure something out to the Nth degree instead of making some great contacts.

John
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KG9H on February 15, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
It is great to hear that people keep trying new things. I use a similar antenna (very narrow lot here in Antioch, IL) and run it 30 feet up, 120 feet parallel to the ground. It is fed with an MFJ-925 tuner (yes.. it is an indoor tuner, in a plastic box!!) and feed it with coax. I have a ground rod there and a few wires for counterpoise. The tuner is outside, bias-T inside by the radio. Works 160-6 meters. With 5-100 watts I have a ball! Long wire? Short wire? Wire!!
Frank KG9H
 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KU2US on February 21, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
I use a 102' G5RV! Works for me!
 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by W8VFM on February 23, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Pete: A great post and drawing on your QRZ site. This is a great hobby and we learn so much from others experiments that we can use if we have similar situations. I am glad ham radio antenna's are not an "exact science". I come from the days of pi- network finals and long wires starting at the output of the final tank coil. How we made so many contacts with that simple design still amazes me! Keep experimenting and having fun! That's ham radio.
Ned W8VFM (58 years of radio fun)
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by KC1SS on February 24, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Well, the 2013 i60 meter contest was fun! 150 contacts, 25 multipliers in 5 hours with 100 watts! I simply had a blast! From Vermont, the antenna reached Illinois, Wisconsin, Alabama, Florida, Prince Edward Island, Ontario, Quebec and everything in between! This served the purpose it was built to do. Thank you for your support and I hope you try this antenna or another of your own design. 160 meters is not dead! The contests we have educate us all on how our station and the bands really perform. Get on the air and have fun!
73,
Pete KC1SS
 
160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by WT0V on March 2, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
I have a 80 meter horizontal loop and have great results 80 thru 10 and feed it with coax!This antenna works great on 160,just feed center conductor of PL259 into back of your HF rig,with a good ground my tuner tunes fast no RF in shack.Give this a try.de WT0V
 
RE: 160 Meter Longwire for Limited Spaces  
by N8FNR on March 3, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
If you put a remote tuner at the base of the wire it will match it to any desired frequency on 160.
I use a long wire also for 160 and have a SGC-239 Smartuner at the base of it to match the wire. http://www.sgcworld.com/239ProductPage.html The only thing "bad" about it is that you can only run 80W continuous (CW, RTTY etc) with it. But it does work pretty well and I used this setup to work a lot of DX on all of the HF bands until I put up a SteppIR vertical.

Zack
N8FNR
 
Email Subscription
You are not subscribed to discussions on this article.

Subscribe!
My Subscriptions
Subscriptions Help

Other Antennas Articles
6 Band Wire Antenna