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Ham Radio Enthusiasts Keeping Old Technology Alive:

from cbc.ca on January 12, 2013
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Ham Radio Enthusiasts Keeping Old Technology Alive:

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Ham Radio Enthusiasts Keeping Old Technology Alive:  
by AI2IA on January 12, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
...keeping old technology alive?
Where is the "old technology"?

Media writers consistently persist in this myth of old ham technology.

No components, no radio gear, no antennas, no benefits of communication in ham radio fit the mental image of "old technology."

This is an example of media writers' ignorance and/or conspiracy to drive sincere inquiry away from a valuable resource, learning tool, and endeavor that encourages scientific progress.

I doubt that in Red China they would refer to ham radio as "old technology."

When all else fails ...........
 
Ham Radio Enthusiasts Keeping Old Technology Alive:  
by W3DCB on January 13, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
As noted in the other comment posted so far, "Media writers consistently persist in this myth of old ham technology." What old technology? Radio is in every aspect of this "new" technology. Guests often visit my station and marvel at my station consisting of SDR and some of the most advanced digital and solid state technology which incorporates several i7 computers with streaming and remote functions, advanced DSP radios such as an FTdx9000D, an IC-7800, FT-2000, TS-2000, IC-910H and others running various digital modes and satellite. When I was a kid, PLL frequency control became viable and was even incorporated in commercially available stereo receivers. I was able to watch as radios and TV went from tubes to solid state. I remember when color TV was far too expensive for regular people to afford...I could not have imagined a radio like an IC-7800 when I was a kid much less an SDR radio like the Flex-6700 that I have on order...Old technology?
 
RE: Ham Radio Enthusiasts Keeping Old Technology Alive:  
by NN4RH on January 13, 2013 Mail this to a friend!


Hmmm.

To talk to someone in particular via ham radio you need 10 - 20 pounds of equipment, lots of cables, an antenna system; the cooperation of the sun and the ionosphere, and is only possible a few hours a day; you're likely to be interfered with by electrical devices around you and other stations; and you need a schedule set up in advance probably by some means other than ham radio.

Meanwhile, a cell phone weighs a couple ounces, is smaller than the microphone on most ham rigs; can be used any time of the day or night to talk to anyone anywhere in the world, and requires no special skills, there's a perfectly readable signal, and all you need is the phone number.

I can send and receive almost inconceivable amounts of data and information, almost instantly, with 100% reliability, from anywhere with a wireless internet access, with a device that weighs about a pound and can run for 8 hours on an internal battery that weighs an ounce. To send the same data via ham radio without AC power, I'd need many pounds worth of radio, a separate computer, an interface, and a couple hundred pounds of batteries, feedline, antenna, and would have to use a mode immune to the fluctuations of propagation, no interference, and would take days or weeks to do.

Ham radio follows technology, mostly by decades, it is not in the forefront.
 
RE: Ham Radio Enthusiasts Keeping Old Technology Alive:  
by K0KUZ on January 13, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Yup. Just this morning my XYL said she could not understand why I needed a license and all that radio equipment just to talk to folks when I have a cell phone that works much better and will do the same thing?
 
Ham Radio Enthusiasts Keeping Old Technology Alive:  
by WA7RBC on January 13, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
I think if we try to pass off amateur radio as modern technology we're going to lose the argument.

Instead, let's focus on the fact that using the technology we do requires skill and practice--and in this we find enjoymnet. That's an argument we can easily win. Plus we might interest a few young people too!
 
Ham Radio Enthusiasts Keeping Old Technology Alive:  
by KB2VEC on January 14, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
First off cell phones are just a form of repeater use which ham radio was using long before cell phones became a must have. For the past fifty years or maybe more you could call anybody any where in the world with the old land line, still nothing new. Ham radio is not dependent on other means to forward the message, we go direct through the air, no cell towers or other means you have to pay for. Now I know I am going to get a lot of crap for this posting so save your time and energy and dont bother giving me any hell about about it because I dont give a damn what you think .
 
Ham Radio Enthusiasts Keeping Old Technology Alive:  
by W6JAK on January 14, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
The wheel is ancient technology. Let's see some headlines like, "BMW, Mercedes, Lexus keeping old technology alive."
 
Ham Radio Enthusiasts Keeping Old Technology Alive:  
by VE6BGM on January 14, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Certainly, cell phones have their place. One aspect that cell phones don't have is the ability to listen to more than 1 coversation, with more than 1 person most of the time. I use ham radio as an exercise to learn more about electronics, both reading and listening. Cell phones are too expensive and slow to allow one to do this. But like a cell phone, if I don't like the coversation, I can turn it off, or switch frequencies. And cell phones don't entertain me near as much.
 
Ham Radio Enthusiasts Keeping Old Technology Alive:  
by KP4FAR on January 20, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Most hams use state of the art technology, not old technology. Yes cell phones are easier to use and lightweight. Wait until a good nasty solar flare takes out a few satellites. Then we will see how good radio still is. Like someone else said, cell phones are just transmitters working through a repeater. Basically old technology too isn't it? The problem here is that if the repeater goes belly up, everything is lost.
 
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