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[Articles Home]  [Add Article]  

The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade

from Jim Griffith, WA7NDD on July 30, 2013
View comments about this article!

The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade
By Jim Griffith, WA7NDD

It was July of 2012 when the Old Man Go Box article published on eHam.net. I received many gracious comments for the article, and over fifty emails. I thank you all for the kind words. To get more details read the previous article. With Field Day approaching, I decided to upgrade the Old Man Go Box making it more useful for the event. Because of my mobility problems carrying individual pieces of equipment, then hooking it all up, just does not work for me. I am not a fan of wires strung all over anyway, so this idea works for me. My day of backpacks and heaving wire over a tree is over, and it comes fast!

Modifying the O.M.G.B brought some changes. I lost storage for coax and other things tucked in the box, the SCG DSP speaker became an external accessory. The additions include an HF Packer (modified) 30-watt amplifier, an MFJ 5 watt QRP wattmeter with an added 50-watt scale, power pole connection for external power to operate my computer and DSP speaker, and a Hendricks QRP Kits Battery Status Indicator. The center angled iron rails fitted together is the location of the home brew Power Pole Rig Runner supplying connections for the solar panel, accessories, external battery, and DC charger for internal 7amp hour battery.


Before


After

Above is the before and after pictures. The space under the radio in the left picture was used to store coax and other radio equipment. The right picture shows that space taken up by the amplifier and SWR Power meter, and battery. The control panel is made by placing the edges of two aluminum angle iron together. Where they meet, I used a nibbler to place notches in the lower edge for the power pole connectors, painted than pop-riveted back into place. The white pop-rivets show how the modification removing the lower aluminum angle was made. The control panel contains the, Ant. SO239, battery test button and LED, solar charger on/off, Internal/external battery, Acc. Power Pole (12 volts out), External Battery input, Solar Panel connection, and DC Charger for internal 7amp hour battery.

This is the HF Packer Amplifier Version 4 Revision 5. After I put the upgraded go box together, I put it on the air and all worked well. When running PSK-31 the amp did get very warm. Vergil of HF Packer, sales a model with a fan for those who run digital modes, I modified my amp with two fans from All Electronics, and 3 mm LEDs indicating the band the amp is set for. For more information, see the link, http://site.hfprojectsyahoo.com/home. My amp did 30-watts CW with 2.5 watts in from the FT-817. Because the Z-817 tuner is rated at 20 watts, I keep the drive down to 15-watts. Even at 15-watts on PSK-31, the amp gets very warm so I installed fans.

MFJ designed the MFJ 813 QRP SWR/Power meter for 5 watts full scale. I used my Kenwood TS-590S to calibrate a 50-watt scale on the meter. I was surprised that the 50-watt scale was very close to matching the 5-watt markings. I ordered a Hendricks QRP Kits Battery Status Indicator. The LED glows three colors Green, Orange, and Red. Green and Orange youre okay, Red the battery is at 11 volts. For more information, see the link, a href = "http://www.qrpkits.com/" target="_new">http://www.qrpkits.com/.

I carry a plastic toolbox containing my SCG DSP speaker, a HP 110 notebook computer running Windows XP and FLdigi, which fits the small 8 screen well. Also in the box is coax and my MFJ 259B, saves a lot of antenna tuning when it is hard to get around. The radio case still holds the Super Antenna MP-1.

This is the bottom of the modified frame to hold the battery, amp, and SWR meter. The terminal strip is the main connection point for all the power and switches. Mini automotive fuse holders protect the equipment. The top of the frame is shown below. Velcro straps cut to length, and wrapped around the equipment frame holds the equipment in place, a piece of sticky sided Velcro stuck to the equipment with the wrap over it holds it solid.

The photos show the frame mounted in the case and the case closed. The project frame worked well and very convenient in getting rid of the hook up time. So how did field day work out? After two months of modifying the go box including building the amplifier, modifying the frame, I was not able to participate in field day. The Old Man Go Box was just fine, the old man ended up with a bad sinus infection, of which I am still feeling the effects. I realize that one could use a radio with power and turner, but QRP with a little added kick when needed is fun, and will run for many hours with small power requirements.

Member Comments:
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The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by KG5KS on July 30, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Appreciate the update and looks like a solid portable setup.
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by W0FM on July 30, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
NIce job, Jim. What does the whole package weigh in at?

Terry WFM
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by N6AJR on July 30, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Good job. It has most everything you need. With radios in the shack, the car (900 mhz kenwood and a ft 857d) and 5 radios in the pick up (2m ,440, 6m, 220 mhz,900 mhz, 1.2 ghz , and 160 to10m on hf, and antennas) . I decided my need for a go box was redundant, so I took it apart. But a go box is a handy thing and I have seen them go from a small lunch box size , to one set up on a furniture dolly, to one setting on a 2 axle enclosed trailer. If you work with ems or other safety types then your need are more significant.

build what you need, and enjoy. your set up is very clean and done nicely
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by N0PSH on July 30, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Nice! Yup I'd like to know the weight also.
TNX,
AL
 
The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by K9ZF on July 30, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Looks great!

I am planning to do something similar with my FT897D soon. I have this rig dedicated to Portable / Rover / Field Day use, so setting it up in a "go box" would work well.

73
Dan

--
K9ZF
Amateur Radio Emergency Service, Clark County Indiana. EM78el
former K9ZF /R no budget Rover ***QRP-l #1269
Check out the Rover Resource Page at:
<http://www.qsl.net/n9rla>
List Administrator for: InHam+grid-loc+ham-books
Ask me how to join the Indiana Ham Mailing list!
 
The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by AB9TX on July 31, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
A Kenwood TS 2000x might be even more portable, no external amp or tuner needed.
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by OE9FWV on July 31, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
but you need more power supply for the TS-2000 and in sum it will probably be heavier. I think 30 W is a good compromise if you have to carry the whole thing.
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by K6AER on July 31, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
You can always turn down the power to use less current. I agree the TS-2000 shack-in-the-box with HF, VHF & UHF is a great emergency rig. You can buy one used for under $1000. A good Lithium 20 amp battery will give you over 10 hours of use with the HF power set at 25 watts out.

A dipole tossed over trees and you are ready to go.

Another reason for using the TS-2000 is the radio is a solid die cast chassis and is very rugged.

A small DPS-25 25 amp switch mode charger power supply and you can charge the battery and run the radio at full power.
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by OE9FWV on July 31, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
my main concern is the current drain in RX.

Current Drain (Less than) Transmit:
20.5 A ( HF, 6m, 2m), 18 A (70cm), 9 A (23cm)
Standby: 2.6 A

2.6A standby is too much for my taste when on batteries.

Your mileage may vary.
 
The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by N5TWB on July 31, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
As an adjunct to the pending questions on the weight, perhaps you can clarify if you really meant "iron" when you state the materials as "angle iron". My observation of the shapes/thickness of the angle materials that they are actually aluminum. I hope so for the weight factor.
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by N5TWB on July 31, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Never mind, I see that, later in the article, you begin to use the ever-so-clear naming technique of "aluminum angle iron".
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by AB9TX on July 31, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Werner, but when you add up all the peripherals the idle current is probably similar. Having owned the Kenwood- it is an amazing radio. It also sports a nifty handle on the side and can operate on its side...
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by K6AER on July 31, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
I agree with AB9TX

With your communication ratio as 50% receive and 50% transmit the receive current is at best 10% of your battery life. Just get a solar charge set up for 5-6 amps of charge current. 14V times 6A would require only a 60 watt panel. You can buy 120 watt panel for about $200.

Every one tries to creep along on the minimal battery and charge supply. You don't know the depth of an emergency. Why plane for 8 hours of operation when it might last for many rainy days.

This is where that Harbor Freight generator comes in real handy.
 
The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by W0LTL on July 31, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
FT897 does all modes, QRP to 100 Watts and with internal power supply is self contained exxcept for a tuner.
 
The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by N4UED on July 31, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
They had a contest at the Raleigh Ham Fest . It was someone their with a portable case like this one . It won first prize . You did a great job on your kit . Chuck N4UED
 
The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by WA7NDD on July 31, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Thank you for all the comments. The box, including antennas, components, and 7 amp hour battery weighs around 15 pounds, and can be lifted with one handle. As for the comments on the TS-2000, I am sure it is a nice radio. I have a TS-590S, and even though it is loaded with all you need, it does not have VHF or UHF, and I would not take it portable. But I think some are missing the point. Its called the Old Man Go Box for a reason. I lost my normal mobility so I use an electric three-wheel cart a lot. The box fits on my walker and cart just fine, and cant be dinged up moving it about compared to a TS-2000. Compared to other emergency go boxes Ive seen, I can lift this one, the others require a strong back, mine got broke, and most did not have and internal battery.
Thank You WA7NDD
 
The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by K1CJS on August 1, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Nice job. The design allows for what you want and need--and that is the criteria for many of these boxes. What the need is and what the owner wants in it.

I had a DJ rack box that opened at the front and the back. It wasn't very heavy, so I wanted to see what I could build into it. There was room for 144/440 rig, a small scanner, a small HF rig and a switcher power supply with room left over for speakers, a switching and connection panel and a LED light bar for night/darkened area use. Since I had a battery box already built, so I wasn't worried about including any batteries.

I put all the gear into the case without assembling anything--and it weighed so much that I forgot about building it! I could lift and carry it, but any carrying over uneven ground or longer distances was out of the question. Smaller and lighter is definitely better, and yours fits the bill in both categories. 73!
 
The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by WS4E on August 1, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Here is a link to the original article becuase it was not in this one for some reason:

http://www.eham.net/articles/28564
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by AB9TX on August 1, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Well, i am an "old Man"- and reading a tiny F817 display would be a challenge. The TS200 is physically smaller than your go rack kit- but you have a point in that it could get scratched up.. The weight of the Kenwood is around 20 lbs.

Ergonomically the Kenwood would be better, and can do both UHF/VHF and HF at the same time! ---Or you can turn off the 2nd receiver to run at reduced current. Mine ran about 1.8 amps in receive mode. The Kenwood also has a nifty remote control head you could mount on your scooter handlebars... ")

Now I miss that radio-- sigh

Great job on the rack mount by the way...

Earl
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by K8QV on August 2, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
If I had the money, time and skills to build a deluxe portable station such as this, I probably would. In the mean time, the same can be accomplished rather simply.

Portable to me means lightweight and simple to deploy. I have an IC-703, battery, coax, EFHW wire for 20m, spool of 50# braided fishing line and a lead weight, Heil single headset and small Vibroplex paddles. It all mounts/stores in a Playmate personal cooler, and the lid even doubles as a desktop. I can operate for quite some time with this simple, instant setup. If I'm feeling motivated I can bring another small case with a tripod, Buddipole and extra battery/power supply.

Of course "when all else fails" the orange vest, blinky lights, badges, patches and HT can be worn on the body. :)
 
The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by VE3XQQ on August 3, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Excellent!! It is good to see creativity and invention culminating into such a fine end result.

My 'deployment kit' is an old 50 cal ammo box with an ICOM 718, YAESU 707 tuner and an Alinco switching PS. It is heavy as all get out but it works. This is my home staion that is on rails, so all I do is slide the whole kit and kaboodle out from one to the other.

This meets my needs as only have one hf rig and the vhf is in the car.

Again, great article thanks for taking the time to put this article out for all to see.
 
Being colorful helps being safe.  
by AI2IA on August 3, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
This thread is a good opportunity to bring up some points about safety and emcomm/event participation.

Here is my suggestion: You can never be too colorful to be safe. Any kind of events, emergency or community events, can bring numbers of people, vehicles, and youngsters.

Over the years I have found that wearing vests, hats, even at night or in the rain, blinking lights, really promotes safety and attracts attention for those who need to see you such as lost youngsters, or people with injuries. So, please don't feel goofy wearing attention getting gear! It is also for your own safety when vehicles are on the move and you and/or they are in unfamiliar locations. I have friends and family who have been struck by vehicles at highway locations even with traffic lights present.

Also, a word about ID badges. These help you explain why you are at a scene or event, and distinguish you from regular attendees. They show that you are not loitering, or butting your nose in people's participation, but are there to help, if needed. So, if event sponsors offer you an ID badge of some sort, do take it and display it so both participants and if need be, law enforcement know why you are hanging around.

Personally, if nothing else were available than a tall, orange, cone shapped hat with a bell on it and a flashing light at night, as long as it had a chin strap,I would take it and use it. It would help to keep me alive to participate in the next event.

As for the naysayers, remember that they are too wrapped up in themselves to even consider safety and good practice. Be friendly. Be helpful. Be unassuming and courteous, and go home alive feeling that you did a good service, because you did.
 
RE: Being colorful helps being safe.  
by JOHNZ on August 4, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
@AI2IA
Other than a mental health facility, a hamfest is the only place one can see grown men parading around wearing orange cone-shaped hats with a bell and flashing lights on the top and a chin strap to secure said hat in place.
 
RE: Being colorful helps being safe.  
by K8QV on August 4, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
<<< Other than a mental health facility, a hamfest is the only place one can see grown men parading around wearing orange cone-shaped hats with a bell and flashing lights on the top and a chin strap to secure said hat in place. >>>


Come on, all the emergency hotshots wear those. Just look at the uniforms of the police, paramedics, firemen, uh, wait........
 
The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by ALCO141 on August 5, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
nice job.

alex
kc9pwt
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by KD8GTP on August 6, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
I like it ! A clean setup, no hanging wires to tangle or trip you or others. Everything is upfront, in easy reach. I say GOOD job :)
Please keep in mind that a go box is only as good as your emergency response vehicle. The go box is of no use if you can't make it to the emergency scene quickly. As another post says, flashing lights are for safety, both yours and others. A strobe lightbar is a good choice. Under grill strobs, dash lights, deck lights, all these provide safety for both you and the public as well as clearing traffic as you proceed to the emergency scene. An orange cone shaped hat with flashing lights is a joke, but a well 'lighted' vehicle will get you to the scene quickly and safely. As the other poster says, it is safety for both you and the public. And don't be ashamed to wear a badge, it lets others know that you are a emergency responder.
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by JOHNZ on August 7, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
@KD8GTP
Ah yes, tnx for bringing back memories of growing up in a tiny rural town. All the "first responder" volunteers would see who could get to the fire house first to drive the fire truck with all the flashing lights and siren, as it careened down the road running cars off the road into the ditch, speeding to farmer Jethro's barn fire. Other disappointed volunteers would have to drive their own vehicles, equipped with dozens of flashing lights and wailing sirens and large signs saying "fireman." As hoses were strung to a nearby creek, others would set up the tubs of cold beer for the volunteers to get refreshed, while spraying water in all directions. The obese and staggering falling down "fire chief" after a couple hours of partying would declare the fire out and everyone would celebrate with BBQ and kegs of iced beer, fortified with vodka. With the fire out, the first responder volunteers would return home, drunk driving and swerving all over the road. Nothing like seeing a falling down drunk in his bright orange vest, badge, and metal fireman's hat with chin strap! One year they caught Bubba-the-volunteer deliberately setting fires, because it was a slow year.
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by W5GNB on August 7, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Hey JOHNZ...
Sounds like you have been here to My town before...you have described the Perfect scenario for the Em-Comm gang around here.....

Personally, whenever the "MAD-MAX" syndrome begins (And it Won't be long according to the present political climate), I will Not be fooling around with any stupid Radios.
I will be locking myself into the bunker and standing by with my LARGE guns with home-loaded Hot charged Ammo waiting for some sorry, worthless neighbor to Steal my FOOD!!!!!
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by KD8GTP on August 10, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Only wackers are into these go box things. A lot of the ARES clowns here in Ohio have them mounted in their trunks. Gives the hobby a bad name is all I can say :(
 
RAY IS CRAZY  
by WB9QEL on August 10, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
If I want to wear a cone on my head with a chin strap I will. You guys need to lighten up a little on Ray, he's nuts.

73
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by K9MHZ on August 13, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
A go box...how special. Where are you going to go with the go box?

Why don't you sell that stuff and invest in a bike...that's one of those nifty gadgets that will get you out in the normal world and may even improve your health.

A go box...LOL.
 
I recommend a (Grab and Go) Manpack  
by W4KYR on August 14, 2013 Mail this to a friend!

I recommend a (Grab and Go) Manpack. Like the VX 1210, PRC, Army Manpack Radio setups. Go Boxes are good, but 'Grab and Go' Manpacks are really ready to go.

Whats the difference? With a Grab and Go Manpack just grab the radio lift the antenna and press on and you are on the air. No Connecting anything, everything is self contained. No connecting power supplies, hooking up connections or positioning the equipment.

For instance with the Vertex VX 1210 it can hang on your door knob by its shoulder strap and ready to go when you are. Everything is connected all together, batteries, tuner, antenna, mic. Now, not everyone can afford a Vertex VX 1210 with all the accessories ($1500 to $2000+) or a really good PRC Manpack...I certainly can't.

But the good news is you can 'roll your own'. On E-Bay, they sell those "Radio Carriers" for $159+/- and using your existing equipment you can make your own Grab and Go Manpack. You can mount a FT 817, tuner, battery and antenna on to the "Radio Carrier" frame and you have a Grab and Go Manpack.

In addition you can use other radios too, like the IC-703, SGC-2020 even the FT 857 and IC 706MkIIG. And if you want you can even design your own Manpack like this resourceful ham did.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zPwxPXRA4Q


Google "FT 897 Manpack" under Google IMAGES and you will see quite a lot of these 'home made' Manpack carriers. Some of them look pretty good. You can make a real light Manpack with just a FT 817, tuner, batteries and a already mounted portable HF antenna. Or make it it heavier duty like the FT897 seen in the Youtube video. Imagination, creativity and $$$ are the only limitations.
 
RE: I recommend a (Grab and Go) Manpack  
by K8QV on August 14, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
As I said earlier, I have a complete station mounted/stored in a Playmate cooler. Not rocket science. I have this kit because I like to occasionally go out to the beach or a park and play radio with no preparation. As far as "disaster" communications, the victims of disaster much prefer you bring water, food and clothing rather than a box of expensive hobby equipment. Conical orange hats with blinking lights are optional, of course.
 
The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by WA7NDD on August 15, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
It seems to me, the comments on my project have gone where they were not intended, at least by me. It is obvious some have not been involved in a serious disaster, I have! In 1976, a quiet Saturday morning when one would have thought nothing could go wrong, the Teton Dam northeast of Rexburg Idaho suddenly broke. The flood killed several people, wiped out several small towns, and flooded major cities. One minute your fine, the next minute, with no warning, you have a disaster. It only took three hours for the State Police Repeater to burn up. Phone offices were flooded along with the underground conduits containing phone lines. No cell phones in those days, amateur radio became the sole provider of communications for three days between Civil Defense Directors in three cities.

I just attended a conference on Emergency Preparedness. The keynote speakers paid job was to provide disaster communications. He told us that in every major disaster, hurricanes, earthquakes, and floods the first communications to quit are cell phones. If you dont think that is true, try to use your cell phone near and large gathering of people, say a Boy Scout Jamboree, Rock Concert. You will find that about 200 cell phone calls will plug up the system without a disaster. No, we do not wear cone hats, but I rather suspect that some of the comments made here are by those who wear pointy ones.
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by JOHNZ on August 15, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
@WA7NDD
Relax Jim, your project is worthy, and your time is well spent, versus sitting in a bar drinking or shooting up something, and I bet you don't waste your time constantly bickering with other hams. Sadly though, we hams believe we are far more important than we are in the real world. I mean really, who would be dumb enough to live in the shadow of a major dam that could wash us away in minutes? That was 1976, today, professional responders have back ups to back ups, and hams are regarded as a nuisance. Really. See my story about growing up in a tiny rural town over 50 years ago. That county is now an industrialized center with a residential population near one million. No more volunteer fire fighter Bubbas. They were replaced with professional first responders, supplemented by a cadre of on call paraprofessional volunteers who qualify and received the same training as the full time professionals. No hams needed or desired. In fact, last time I was home, I saw a few hams in yellow vests and hats milling around on the town square for a parade. They had handi-talkies and cell phones that they used to call 911 with. Any grade school kid can be trained to do that. Like contests though, to each his own, and hams will continue to falsely believe our hobby is far more vital and important than it really is.
 
IT'S A HOBBY  
by WB9QEL on August 15, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Folks in this hobby will argue over anything to make their point that it's not a hobby. Cone hats, disrespectful posts. Are you guys crazy, it's just a hobby for goodness sake.

I just dropped my smoke on the carpet, gotta go!!

73's





 
RE: IT'S A HOBBY  
by K8QV on August 15, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Just a hobby?!?!? Blasphemy!!!
 
RE: IT'S A HOBBY  
by KF5DEY on August 16, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
I had to double check that I wasn't reading some pre-teen video game chat...I haven't seen this much hate spewn in a long time.

The author of this thread mentioned that he had a injured back and was confined to a mobility device...so no he can't go out and ride a bike.

Also there was a time when people were responsible for not only themselves, but would take care of their neighbors...putting up a building, helping out when the neighbor was sick, helping put out fires...

I grew up in the 80's and I saw these things...including the fact that the only fire departments around were volunteer.

There are people out there who geek out over the things they really like...movies, airplanes, sports, religion, politics, why is it wrong to geek out over radios?

To city dwellers with their latte shops and yoga classes, this is just a hobby...but there are plenty of people outside cellphone coverage and questionable (if any) landline phone who use radio as their only means of communication.

Stop the hate, I would think it is beneath you.

As to the project, I think it is neat, I don't need one right now, but I think I would copy the design if I did.

Thanks
 
The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by WV8P on August 17, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
VERY Impressive!!! This has started me thinking for a Go Box.

73 OM
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by KD8GTP on August 17, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
I want one to !!
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by K9MHZ on August 19, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
>>>>by KF5DEY on August 16, 2013
The author of this thread mentioned that he had a injured back and was confined to a mobility device...so no he can't go out and ride a bike<<<<

I think you pinned down the silly irony of this all on your won.


The issue isn't "hate" as many of you millennials always cry when you can't handle disagreement or opposing points-of-view. It's about fostering a positive public image of ham radio. Badges, LED bars, helmets, police wannabe uniforms and vehicles, officious behavior.....all very strange and just begs for ridicule or worse.

We have lots of bandwidth that needs protecting, and the League promotes EMCOMM as a way of countering big-money interests....that's actually good, IMHO. Message handling for health and welfare when yes, cell systems go down....all good. But this obsession with being in the middle of things, being on the front lines, trying to look official when you're anything but.....it's just plain nuts. And it always seems to attract an element that never amounted to much otherwise....something of an easy second chance to feel important.

Hey, if this guy wants to mount some expensive gear in an orange box and wait for the big one to hit, then God bless him....
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by NM0O on August 24, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
It is obvious that there are some folks who like to wear multiple portables on military vests and be officious. It would, however, be nice for others of us not to be painted with the same brush - as "wackers."

Over the past 34 years, I have been involved in various kinds of public service/safety communications, from fires in California to bike/foot races and SAR. While I have seen wannabes in some of those events, I am not one of them.

The only lights on my vehicle are the ones the manufacturer put there, and I have one portable assigned by the OEM, one I bought, and a photo ID issued by my city. The wannabes wash out pretty quickly; they don't know how to function when police, fire, and OEM are trying to get things done.
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by KD8GTP on August 25, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Jon,
There are a number of people in this hobby who just can't get it through their heads that this is just a hobby. I also collect z scale model trains, Marklin. I went to a model train show last year and guess what I saw. A half dozen grown men wearing train engineer outfits. These are 'train wackers'. These guys hang out at train yards, switching stations, etc, just as ARES clowns hang out at fire stations, police stations, etc.
I was ashamed to be seen at this model train show, these guys give us model train collectors a bad name. So what I'm trying to say is this. These clowns, ARES, storm watchers, whatever you call yourselves who run around pretending to be emergency responders give us ham hobbyist a bad name, make us all look like ARES clowns. just as the wanna be a train engineer wackers at the train show give the train hobby people a bad name. Take the light bars off your cars, get rid of the emergency communications officer badges( you are not emergency communications officers) dump the ARES clown patches and grow up.
GOD Bless
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by K9MHZ on August 25, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
GTP.....Amen!

 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by KE4ZHN on August 26, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
KD8GTP - Man did you hit that nail on the head! Sorry if it ruffles feathers, but the guys walking around in orange vests wearing 20 HT's on their belt trying to look important are an embarrassment to amateur radio. And to themselves.
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by K5YJX on August 28, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Back to the point though, wasn't this about his project? I think it's neat that he built it, and put effort into putting something together. What's wrong with that?
 
RE: The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by K9MHZ on September 4, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
What's "wrong with that" has already been posted over and over....albeit a veer away from the OP's original topic. It's just a plea to stop the ridiculousness, and to try and at least look and act normal to the uninformed.

Once again, with respect to the OP and his little project, God bless him if that's what he wants to do.

 
The Old Man Go Box -- Upgrade  
by ZL2TW on September 17, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Hi all, for those who are giving this guy a hard time, did you note his introductory comment:

"With Field Day approaching, I decided to upgrade the Old Man Go Box making it more useful for the event"

He wants to use it for field day, not to chase disasters etc. I think some apologies to this guy are in order.
 
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