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The Teenage Radio Enthusiasts Who Helped Win World War II:

from bbc.co.uk on July 6, 2013
Website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-23162846
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The Teenage Radio Enthusiasts Who Helped Win World War II:

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The Teenage Radio Enthusiasts Who Helped Win World War II:  
by AB9H on July 6, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
Every time has its heroes, but unfortunately some are falling forgotten. Here is a link about two young HAM-s, twin brothers, from Srebrenica, who have fallen during aggression over Bosnia and a genocide over Bosnian people committed by serbian forces.

"Postcard From The Grave
By: Emir Suljagic
Memories of Sead and Senad

Them two were, at least in my eyes, the soul of the city when it was sentenced to pitilessness, and when everything around us was in deadly silence. Sead and Senad Dautbasic were, as I thought, we all should have been. Serious, and strict to others, but even more strict to themselves. They were the greatest fanatics among radio amateurs that I had ever met. I saw them everyday for more than two years and it continued to amuse me how people confused one with the other. Of course only after I could tell them apart.They were those rare type of people that war couldn’t ruin. Their honesty was frightening, sense for duties rare, as the way they completed their job. More than once I watched as they almost with disgust -- during a time when every crumb of food was precious -- refused gifts from the villagers in exchange for speaking with their families. Both quiet, I had a feeling that they could only confess to each other; we, the others, were strangers, and they were mysterious to me as they were the first time I met them... (open a link to read more
http://www.ab9h.com/articles.html
 
The Teenage Radio Enthusiasts Who Helped Win World War II:  
by AB9H on July 10, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
http://www.qrz.com/db/E718S
 
The Teenage Radio Enthusiasts Who Helped Win World War II:  
by AB9H on July 11, 2013 Mail this to a friend!
The following article was written by Mr. Emir Suljagic, writer, survivor of a Srebrenica Genocide, July 11, 1995 in Eastern Bosnia, depicting the role of Radio-Amateurs during aggression over Bosnia. Unfortunately, today, 18 years after, those HAM's are being forgotten by all of the ruling authorities in Bosnia, local and International! I am posting this article to pay homage to all the HAM's fallen during aggression over Bosnia! 73, Joe, AB9H

Postcard From The Grave
By: Emir Suljagic
Memories of Sead and Senad

Them two were, at least in my eyes, the soul of the city when it was sentenced to pitilessness, and when everything around us was in deadly silence. Sead and Senad Dautbasic were, as I thought, we all should have been. Serious, and strict to others, but even more strict to themselves. They were the greatest fanatics among radio amateurs that I had ever met. I saw them everyday for more than two years and it continued to amuse me how people confused one with the other. Of course only after I could tell them apart.

They were those rare type of people that war couldn’t ruin. Their honesty was frightening, sense for duties rare, as the way they completed their job. More than once I watched as they almost with disgust -- during a time when every crumb of food was precious -- refused gifts from the villagers in exchange for speaking with their families. Both quiet, I had a feeling that they could only confess to each other; we, the others, were strangers, and they were mysterious to me as they were the first time I met them.

The next two years I watched them making plans, wish they had this and that -- to me this was all the same strange -- so that in the summer of 1994 they could keenly begin to work. I don’t know how it was possible to do that, but day after day they stretched the wire from hilltop to hilltop above the narrow Srebrenica valley, rise some strange metal poles on the roof of the post office, and at the end, again they were disappointed, because the signal, or whatever, wasn’t as “strong” as they wished. But that antenna was, for sure, the biggest one in the country at the moment.

Thanks only to them, during all those years I was able to speak to the rest of my family; and I wasn’t the only one. Sead and Senad never looked for a reward. Patiently they waited, when it was available, the end of the month and their “pay”: a few kilograms of flour and something of some orange powder, for which, until it was mixed in water it wasn’t clear that it was juice. All that time they were in the same faded pants, and shoes they got from the Humanitarian Aid. They never drank coffee or smoked, but every pack of coffee they ever got from me or Mr. Nuhanovic they took to Nasir Sulejmanovic, our electrician, whom for close friends would say, that “together with a soldering iron he weighed 10 kilograms”.

Sometime after the “fiasco” with the antenna, someone discovered in one of the storage rooms a whole pile of Energoinvest’s computers type Iris 8.1, which was some ancient version of Tetris. We all franticly had played the game in which yellowish figures spun around, too fast for the naked eye to keep up with, on a black background. Twins, but we all saw them as one, soon became the undefeated champions of this strange sport, a sport which took us to some type of normality.

When the Serbs attacked Srebrenica for the last time, they moved the station from room to room, trying to move away from the shelling. The last time I saw them they were in a small room up under the stairwell, where with great hardship they managed to turn the radio on. Nihad Catic, the only reporter left, read his last report from Srebrenica. Sead and Senad were sitting next to him. I am sure that, one or the other, as always, after Nihad had finished his report, reached for some button on the radio, and said: “E, dobro!” (O.K.), looked at each other, satisfied that they had successfully finished the report. For the last time
 
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