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Historical Events in Amateur Radio

Julio Menchaca (WP4OCA) on August 28, 2014
View comments about this article!

1894-1899-- Marconi conducts his wireless experiments in Europe and sends a message across the English Channel.

1901-Marconi sends a wireless signal across the Atlantic.

1900-1908--Thousands experiment with wireless. Few at this time are interested in it as a hobby only.

1904-J.A. Fleming develops the 2 element (Diode) vacuum tube.

1906-Lee deforest develops the 3 element (Triode) vacuum tube. R.A. Fessenden uses the Alexanderson Alternator to make the first voice & music transmissions.

1908-A possible beginning of amateur radio. Prior to this time, interest in wireless had primarily been either as an experimenter or as an entrepreneur. By 1908, definite hobby interests exist among users.

1909-The first radio clubs are formed. Spark and the long-waves (300-6000 meters)

1912-The Titanic disaster points out the need for Wireless Regulation. The Radio Act of 1912 is passed, which limits amateur radio stations to 200 meters.

1913-Edwin Armstrong develops the regenerative receiver and also discovers that the "Audion" (Triode) can oscillate. CW is born.

1914-The ARRL is organized by H.P. Maxim to help relay messages, given the limited range on 200 meters at that time. (25 miles). 1914-1917--The number of amateur radio stations increases. The ARRL starts a little magazine, called "QST".

1918-Major Armstrong develops the super heterodyne receiver while serving in France. C.W. is used by the military during the war.

1919-Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels tries to get the Navy a total monopoly on all wireless communications.

1920-"Amateur Police Radio" becomes popular. Amateurs operated as an intersystem police communications service to relay broadcasts of crimes and stolen vehicles.

1921-1922--The National Amateur Wireless Association becomes active. It's main success is the broadcast of the Dempsey-Carpenter fight. Many amateurs helped in this broadcast, from acting as relay stations to setting up receivers and loudspeakers in public places.

1923-The amateur radio census is at 12,000. Shortwave development continues. The MacMillan Arctic Expedition is the first to carry two way radio; an amateur 200 meter station.

1924-Amateur radio get new bands at 80, 40, 20, and 5 meters. Spark prohibited on the new bands.

1925-The International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) formed 1925.

1926-Radio Act of 1912 to be unenforceable in regards to broadcasting & the Shortwave radio.

1927-The Radio Act of 1927 creates the Federal Radio Commission.

1929-1936--Despite the Depression, Amateur Radio, low cost components make it possible to build a quality station . VHF phone operation becomes popular with the super regenerative receiver (developed by Armstrong) and the modulated oscillator. Phone operation begins to appear on some HF bands. But C.W. & crystal control are still number one.

1933-1934--The Communications Act of 1934 creates the Federal Communications Commission. Amateur radio Licenses are reorganized into Class A, Class B, and Class C. Major Edwin Armstrong develops wide-band FM.

1936-H.P. Maxim, founder of the ARRL & it's first President, dies.

1938-The Cairo Conference. Amateur radio lose the exclusive use of 40 meters, now shared with Broadcasters. The FCC gives us 2 new "UHF" bands, 2 1/2 meters (112 Mc) and 1 1/4 meters.

1939-1940--We are joined in the "UHF" range by two new users--the first FM Broadcast Band.

1942-1945--Except for the War Emergency Radio Service on 2 1/2 meters, no amateur radio operations take place. New "UHF" tubes and circuits are developed as a result of the war.

1945-A major battle develops over postwar frequency allocations. Major Armstrong (FM Broadcasting), and Brigadier General David Sarnoff (RCA/NBC Television), all fight over the low end of the VHF spectrum between 44-108. At one point, the FCC submits 3 Alternatives--one gives us a 7 meter band , two our 5 meter band , and three a 6 meter band . 6 meter band wins and is located between TV Ch 1 and Ch 2 .The FCC moves our 2 1/2 meter band to 144-148 MHz.

On November 15, 1945, amateurs are allowed back on the air--but just on 10 & 2 meters only. 1945-CQ magazine is first published.

1946-The military leaves our HF bands in stages, amateur radio operators gradually get their frequencies back, all except for 160 meters, which will be used for the LORAN Radio navigation system. The FCC creates the Tenth Call District (using the numeral -0-), and realigns the District boundaries. War surplus equipment finds its way into the ham radio market.

1947-The Atlantic City Conference--Amateurs lose the top 300 kc of 10 meters , and will lose 14.35--14.4 on 20 meters. But they will gain a new band at 15 meters in the future. To compensate ham radio for their loss, the FCC allows them to use the 11 meter band on a shared basis with Industrial, Scientific & Medical devices. TVI is starting to become a problem--the ARRL determines that Ch 2 is very vulnerable to TVI & recommends it be eliminated, but the FCC removes Ch 1 instead. The Transistor is developed by Bell Labs.

1948-Single Sideband is fully described in the amateur radio publications.

1951-The FCC completely reorganizes the amateur license system. The Class A, B, & C Licenses are replaced by the Advanced, General, & Conditional Class respectively. Three new license classes are created--the Amateur Extra, Novice & Technician. The Technician Class is created for experimentation, not communication, and has privileges only above 220 MHz Novices are given limited HF CW sub-bands, 75 watts, crystal control only. They may also use phone on 145--147 MHz It is a one year, non renewable license.

1952-The FCC allows phone operation on 40 meters, which had been CW only. The 15 meter band is opened. The Advanced Class is withdrawn from new applicants, although present holders can continue to renew, and the "exclusive" 75 & 20 meter phone bands are opened to Generals & Conditionals. Everyone, Conditional & above, has the same privileges.

1953-The FCC starts issuing "K" calls to amateur radio operators in the 48 States due to the increased ham radio population.

1954-Depressed and broke from his patent fights with RCA over FM, Major Edwin Armstrong commits suicide. His wife continues the fight, winning the last battle in 1967, when the Supreme Court rules that Armstrong did indeed invent FM.

1955-Technicians are given 6 meter privileges to help populate the band & encourage experimentation. The ARRL & most ham radio operators oppose 2 meters for Technicians. Wayne Greene becomes editor of CQ magazine.

1956-1960--A gradual technical revolution on 2 fronts: Transistors find their way into the ham radio shack, first in power supplies, then audio sections, then receivers and finally QRP transmitters. But most equipment was still 100% tubes. Also, SSB is catching up on AM in terms of popularity. By the 1960's, SSB pulls ahead of AM.

1957-Sputnik, the first artificial satellite, is launched by the USSR. Amateurs copy it's beacon on 20 & 40 Mc.

1958-Explorer is launched by the US. Amateurs copy it's signal on 108 Mc. The ham radio population is 160,000--3 times the 1946 total. The FCC has to issue "WA" calls in the 2nd & 6th call areas, as the "W" & "K" 1x3 prefixes have run out. Slow Scan TV is first described in QST. In September, amateurs lose their shared use of 11 meters, as Class D CB is born.

1959-The Geneva Conference held, no major amateur changes. Technicians get the middle part of 2 meters (145-147 Mc), but not without some controversy over the purpose of the license. The FCC restates their "experimental, not communication" policy.

1960-Wayne Greene fired as CQ editor, forms 73 magazine.

1961-OSCAR I, the first amateur radio satellite, is launched. Thousands of Amateurs copy it's 50 mw beacon on 144 Mc.

1962-CONELRAD is replaced by the Emergency Broadcast System. Amateurs no longer have to monitor 640 or 1240 kc while operating their stations.

1963-The ARRL, responding to some complaints about Generals being allowed on 75 & 20 phone, proposes an "incentive licensing" system. Under the ARRL proposal, Generals & Conditionals would lose 75, 40, 20 & 15 meter phone privileges over a 2 year period. The Building Fund, to construct the ARRL Headquarters at 225 Main St., Newington, is in full swing. The amateur radio population is over 200,000, but CB licenses now outnumber hams.

1964-Herbert Hoover dies at the age of 90. As Secretary of Commerce in the 1920's, and President of the United States from 1929-1933, his strong support of amateur radio was invaluable. He lived long enough to see his son (Herbert Hoover, Jr, W6ZH) elected President of the ARRL.

1965-The FCC comes out with it's own incentive licensing proposal.

1969 -The FCC removes the ability for a Technician to hold a Novice license at the same time. The ARRL announces a new policy, they now consider Technicians to be communicators and petition the FCC to give them full VHF privileges, a 10 meter segment from 29.5-29.7 Mc, and Novice CW sub bands.

1970-The amateur radio population is 250,000 but stagnant.2 meter FM is starting to boom. New equipment designed for the amateur radio market joins the surplus wide band commercial radios which were converted for use on 146.94. "Mhz" & "khz" replace "Mc" & "kc".

1972-A national 2 meter FM band plan was announced,146.52 MHz was chosen as the national simplex frequency.

1974-The Electronics Industry Association proposed a new "Class E CB" using 2 MHz of our 220 band.

1975-1976--A new repeater sub band is established at 144.5-145.5 MHz.Technicians now have 144.5-148 MHz on 2 meters, and finally have Novice privileges. Novices are given a power increase to 250 watts. The "mail order" Technician license is eliminated--applicants must appear at a FCC examination site.

1977-The FCC expands CB radio from 23 to 40 channels. Hundreds of hams purchase "obsolete" 23 channel CB sets at fire sale prices and convert them to 10 meters.

1978-Technicians finally get all privileges above 50 MHz, and can obtain a RACES Station authorization. The amateur radio population stands at 350,000. "Packet" radio first appears on the ham bands, on an experimental basis.

1979-The World Administrative Radio Conference, or WARC-79, takes place in Geneva. The ARRL, IARU & other groups have been preparing for years.

1980-Spread Spectrum appears on an experimental basis, and the FCC authorizes ASCII on the ham radio bands.

1983- Owen Garriott, W5LFL, becomes the first amateur radio operator to be on board a Space Shuttle. He makes hundreds of QSO's on 2 meters.

1984-The FCC stopped giving examinations, turning the duty over to the new Volunteer Examiner Program. The amateur radio population is up to 410,000.

1987-Novices & Technicians get 10 meter SSB privileges from 28.3-28.5 MHz Novices also get phone operation on portions of 220 & 1296 MHz The Element 3 written exam is broken into 2 segments--3A (Technician) and 3B (General). Technicians who passed their exam prior to March 1987 get permanent credit towards the General written exam.

1990-1991--MARS (military affiliate radio network) operations increased as amateurs became involved in Operation Desert Shield/Storm. Tens of thousands of Americans discover Shortwave Radio, to get the latest news.

1991-Amateur Radio gets it's first code free license--the "No Code Technician". "Regular" Technicians are renamed "Technician Plus". The first all amateur Shuttle, the "Atlantis", goes into space.

1991-1998--Amateur Radio grows from 500,000 to over 710,000.

Copyright 2011 by The Ham Radio Files.
All rights reserved. c

Member Comments:
This article has expired. No more comments may be added.
 
Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by G3RZP on August 28, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
Although the superheterodyne receiver is credited to Edwin Armstrong, the principle was suggested although using a tuneable IF - by a Frenchman, Lucien Levy in 1909, but the technology to make it was not available. Independently, Meissner in Germany patented the superheterodyne idea six months before Armstrong, but never built one to prove it in practice!

In 1933, articles on SSB appeared in the American R9 magazine, and a few amateurs were actually using it experimentally in the US pre WW2.

Probably the first amateur proposal for a crystal controlled front end tuneable IF receiver was in the last issue of the RSGB's T & R Bulletin before it became the 'RSGB Bulletin' - that was the June 1942 issue.

Not amateur radio, but the cavity magnetron had been patented in Russia in 1930......
 
Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by KB2DHG on August 28, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
WOW I really enjoyed this. Thank you
 
Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by KE6SLS on August 28, 2014 Mail this to a friend!

Kind of stopped suddenly there.

Other things like dropping CW. Loosing the Advanced class. Adding the 60m channels. Last farming of bands by operator class.

That was fun.

tu om. 73


J
 
Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by KE6SLS on August 28, 2014 Mail this to a friend!

Kind of stopped suddenly there.

Other things like dropping CW. Loosing the Advanced class. Adding the 60m channels. Last farming of bands by operator class.

That was fun.

tu om. 73


J
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by N8BOA on August 28, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
You missed a very important event
I have carefully read all of the events but did not see Patrick Coady gets Novice lenience WN8NUG 1972
 
Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by JOHNZ on August 28, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
The author has published false/less than accurate information in two instances, one major & one minor.

A minor mistake is made for the 1942-45 time frame.

The author correctly states that U.S. amateurs were ordered off the air during WWII. War Emergency Radio Service (WERS) operators were essentially amateur radio operators in local communities. There was no such thing as an individual WERS licenese. The WERS license was issued to local governments. In addition to WERS, a select small group of amateurs were authorized by the U.S. government to operate in support of the war time emergency. They acted as auxiliary government monitoring stations, looking for spy activity, unauthorized radio transmissions, etc. They reported directly to the U.S. War Department and were authorized to transmit, when directed, on certain frequencies, in support of their assignments. This authorization was in writing and granted on an individual basis. I was in possession of a written authorization (not me personally, I am too young) and donated same to the Southern Appalachian Radio Museum in Asheville, North Carolina. The patriotic efforts of these skilled individuals is not widely known. They served in silence.

A major mistake is made for the year 1963.

The belief that general class amateurs caused a problem on 75 & 20 meters is a myth, an outright falsehood, created by the liars at the ARRL. The ARRL planted this disinformation, and the myth continues to this day. The ham population was much smaller in 1963, and civility on the ham bands, with the exception of a few miscreants, was practiced by virtually all hams. The ARRL used lies and deception to justify their incentive licensing program. The sole purpose of which was to create income for the ARRL to finance absurd $alaries for ARRL HQ staff. Incentive licensing was strictly an ARRL scheme to finance lavish $alaraies for ARRL staff. The majority of amateurs in 1963 were against incentive licensing, but the selfish ARRL bullies got their way, and the cash flowed into the Newington coffers. Incentive licensing was one of many early acts of selfish treachery perpetrated by the ARRL on a naive uninformed amateur community. To believe otherwise is to believe in the propaganda of historical revisionism that the ARRL spews out in its publications.

 
Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by N0IU on August 28, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
Or you could go here: http://www.ac6v.com/history.htm
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by N7KFD on August 28, 2014 Mail this to a friend!


N8BOA Patrick - don't feel bad he missed KC7APQ in December of 1994 also (hi, hi).

 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by K3FHP on August 29, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
Except at AC6V they left out the league's nefarious involvement and made it look like it was FCC's idea. I have been a life member over 40 years but will never forgive them for taking my privileges away for their profit. I earned my licences though advanced with 13wpm cw and testing in front of an FCC examiner, not someone studies a book for a month and goes to the ham down the street and is an EXTRA. I could easily pass the worthess exam but have resisted. I pass a 13wpm exam in front of an FCC examiner and the New Age Extra has no cw exam....in fact.....doesn't even know what morse letters are but gets to operate in the 25khz I am restricted from. What kind of 'INCENTIVE' licensing program is THAT?
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by N0IU on August 29, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
@ K3FHP -
"I earned my licences though advanced with 13wpm cw and testing in front of an FCC examiner, not someone studies a book for a month and goes to the ham down the street and is an EXTRA. I could easily pass the worthess exam but have resisted. I pass a 13wpm exam in front of an FCC examiner and the New Age Extra has no cw exam....in fact.....doesn't even know what morse letters are but gets to operate in the 25khz I am restricted from."

I don't understand this at all! By not upgrading, you are only hurting yourself. You are the one restricting yourself from those extra 25 KHz, not the ARRL or the FCC. So you passed a 13 wpm code test in front of an FCC examiner, big deal. Do you really think someone is going to see that you hold an Advanced Class license and say, "Wow, he is someone really special because he passed a 13 wpm code test!" Do you really think the fact that you passed a 13 wpm code test is actually going to impress someone?

I seems very shallow and petty to me that someone would judge me in a negative light because of my license class. Besides, I got into amateur radio for my own personal pleasure and enjoyment. Why would I need to prove to anyone that I passed a 13 wpm code test? What good would it do me? And furthermore, why would I even care what anyone else thought about me? I had to prove to three examiners that I could copy code at 13 wpm and that was it! If you really want to impress someone with your knowledge of Morse code, get on the air and have a real QSO with someone using CW.
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by N5SOM on August 29, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
Why do we as a society need to belittle individuals. Everyone in this hobby has had put forth an effort to gain the knowledge to enjoy, and yes, pass licensing requirements.
I agree that the ARRL has not always represented the true interests of the amateur radio community, but there are several areas that without the organization we wouldn't have acquired spectrum befits. I call for a moratorium on personal attacks. Like Mom use to say, "You kids had better learn to try and get along together. "
Thanks for refreshing my memories. It was a good time as I realized my dreams of becoming a "ham" operator. 73
 
Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by PC1MH on August 29, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
Historical Events in Amateur Radio should be Historical Events in American Amateur Radio.

Example: We got our no-morse requirement many years before the Americans did.

The amount of amateurs never increased from 500,000 to over 710,000 as in the 80's there where already more than a million HAMs in Japan only. It should be American amateur radio grows from 500,000 to over 710,000.

The writer is an American and we readers are HAMs. You'd expect a ham to be aware of the fact that hams come from all over the world and not just from that country between Canada en Mexico.
 
Many Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by AI2IA on August 29, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
To all the thin skinned folks, a simple mental correction that you can perform to the title is to add the word "Many" or the word "Some" to the title of this topic. It will make you feel better.

We rightfully proud citizens of the greatest republic in the world normally go about our daily routines as if we were the only people on earth, though mostly in our own neighborhoods, and that is perfectly natural and good.

Folks is other countries go about their business in much the same way. Only idle ideologues and doctrine people with too much time on their hands feel strongly emotionally motivated to tell other people how to live. The funny part is that all this idle talk never convinces anyone to change their ways. Even the very best, if there is a best, of textbook style blah blah means nothing at all. Only actions convince people. Words are mostly vanity, especially on eHam.net.
 
Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by WA1RNE on August 29, 2014 Mail this to a friend!

I believe there are a couple of corrections needed in the timeline concerning Incentive Licensing and the Advanced Class license.


According to AC6V's webpage and W6VRC.org, Incentive Licensing was first proposed in 1963 and became effective November 22, 1968.


Although the Advanced Class license was withdrawn in 1952, it was re-instated in '68 with incentive licensing.

The FCC stopped issuing Advanced Class licenses starting in 2000 but became a grandfathered operator class which can still be renewed to this day.

Also worth noting is the "WA" call prefix were issued in the '57 to '62 time frame to keep up with the growing numbers of amateurs in certain districts.


...WA1RNE
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by KB4QAA on August 29, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
@K3FHP: You couldn't properly tune an alcohol quenched spark gap transmitter to save your life! You're not a 'real ham". ;)

<<K3FHP -
"I earned my licences though advanced with 13wpm cw and testing in front of an FCC examiner, not someone studies a book for a month and goes to the ham down the street and is an EXTRA. I could easily pass the worthess exam but have resisted. I pass a 13wpm exam in front of an FCC examiner and the New Age Extra has no cw exam....in fact.....doesn't even know what morse letters are but gets to operate in the 25khz I am restricted from.">>
 
Some folks refuse to accept the facts.  
by AI2IA on August 29, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
It would make absolutely no difference whatsoever if the FCC consolidated all the classes of ham licenses into just one license and called it the Amateur Radio License, and had only one multiple choice test.

Those proud folks refuse to understand that:

HAM RADIO IS WHAT YOU MAKE IT FOR YOURSELF.

It is not your class of license. It is not all those fine certificates on your wall. It is not your expensive antenna or rig. It is not the fact that all you have is one little H/T.

It is what you do with what have.

End of message.

Ray Mullin, ai2ia
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by N1DVJ on August 30, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
@K3FHP
"I earned my licences though advanced with 13wpm cw and testing in front of an FCC examiner, not someone studies a book for a month and goes to the ham down the street and is an EXTRA. I could easily pass the worthess exam but have resisted. I pass a 13wpm exam in front of an FCC examiner and the New Age Extra has no cw exam"

Wow, I just want to say "WWWAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHH!!!"

Are we supposed to cry for you? Or bow down and prostrate ourselves?
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by K3FHP on August 30, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
Right, except that the ARRL origins of incentive licensing are redacted from the AC6V version, a treason I will never completely forgive them for and for the creation of the "Thirty days in Ham Radio EXTRA" operators(no offense intended to many of these fine people).
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by K3FHP on August 30, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
No need to cry, bowing down will be sufficient. I just wanted to point out how so many things in our society have been watered down to the least common denominator while the rest of the world is growing up around and over us.
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by N0IU on August 30, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
@ K3FHP
"I just wanted to point out how so many things in our society have been watered down to the least common denominator while the rest of the world is growing up around and over us."

And by holding on to your Advanced license with your self-imposed restrictions, exactly how does this prove your point?

The FCC does not care what license class you hold.

The ARRL does not care what license class you hold.

And most importantly, NO ONE ELSE cares!

If someone thinks less of me because I am an Extra, that is entirely their problem, not mine. I don't give a rodent's posterior what anyone else thinks about me based on my license class. Why would I?

I have been an Advanced. It did not make me better looking and more attractive to women. It did not put any money into my bank account. It did not get me a promotion at work.

So go ahead and hold on to your Advanced license. That is just that much less QRM I have to deal with in the portions of the bands I legitimately earned when I got my Extra.
 
Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by JOHNZ on August 30, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
The Bishop of Newington requests that your September tithes be sent in as soon as possible.

Your tithes are needed for the final push of RM-11708.

Don't know what FCC RM-11708 is? Don't worry, just send in your checks.


 
Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by N7KFD on August 30, 2014 Mail this to a friend!

Julio - I enjoyed reading your article. There are a lot of things you covered that I didn't know about. Thank you for taking the time to put this together, what YOU posted was informative and educational for MOST of us.

Jim
N7KFD

 
Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by AE5QB on August 30, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
I would just add, for some interesting and nostalgic reading, go to the ARRL archives and start reading some of the early QST magazines. They are very entertaining and interesting. You will laugh when you see that many of the complaints, sans the no code argument, are not much different than today's gripes. Enjoy! Most of us are old timers and don't have much time left on this green earth. Forgive yourself and others and enjoy this hobby while you still can. Don't die a bitter ole man.

73,

Tom
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by K0BG on August 30, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
You left out an important item in 1948. Besides the SSB article (not the first time covered in QST by the way), the FCC changed the rules, and allowed mobile operation on all HF bands.

Alan, KBG
www.k0bg.com
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by W8IFI on August 30, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
A nice informative article. Some errors? So what? Some peoples days aren't complete if they can't find a reason to point out flaws, bring up negative comments, show off their arrogance,and brag about their credentials and apparently might not even have a license.

Keep nice articles like this coming folks!!
 
Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by LA2TD on August 31, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
The WARC-bands was allocated by the 1979 ITU Conference
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by N0IU on August 31, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
From the AC6V history timeline:

"In 1978-1979, Technicians receive all privileges above 50 MHz. Novice licenses are renewable. The World Administrative Radio Conference, (WARC-79) grants Amateurs three new bands at 10, 18, and 24 MHz, to be phased in over the next 10 years. 30 meter power to be limited to 200 Watts."
 
Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by WB4QNG on August 31, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
I think it is a very good article. Sad part is I lived through a lot of it. As for as the debate over cw and the new licensing system it is just old old debate. If I was getting my license today I would be an extra just to get the band width. I must admit years ago when I met an extra I did bow down to him. I was impressed.
 
If you're a ham, then you are ham radio history.  
by AI2IA on August 31, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
Yes, it is very thrilling to look at a catalog of radio history however complete or incomplete. It is a long time line of very real progress. This article is a good one.

Along the way, do not forget that you are part of ham radio history. You are in it. You operate in it, build in it, assemble if you will in it, study in it, share in it, and stand ready to help others in it in one way or another.

Always, always, always keep in mind that ham radio is what you make it for yourself. Complaining about the golden past, the present, or the future will get you absolutely nowhere.

If you are going to get any goodness out of ham radio, it is going to be gotten by yourself motivated by your attitude.

Ham radio literally is in your hands.

Now that fact is a great privilege for which we all need to be thankful.

Vy 73,
de Ray, ai2ia
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by KT4WO on August 31, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
RE:"Do you really think someone is going to see that you hold an Advanced Class license and say, "Wow, he is someone really special because he passed a 13 wpm code test!""


YES.....I do....I was in the same boat.

So YES...the Advanced class IS something special!!!!
I should have never upgraded.

KT4WO

PS---Most new "Extras" can't build a damn dipole!!!
Bunch of CB'ers is all the new crowd is.

 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by N0IU on August 31, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
RE: "So YES...the Advanced class IS something special!!!!
I should have never upgraded."

Really? Why do you feel that way?

How exactly has your life been negatively impacted since you have upgraded? Has anyone actually refused to engage in a QSO with you because they saw you were an Extra? Has anyone ever questioned your right to work the "lower 25" because they thought you were only an Advanced who did not belong there?

Is your self esteem that low that it really matters to you how other people judge you based on your license class? And besides, do you really think other people even care enough to judge you based on your license class? Besides, what is the worst thing that would happen if someone said, "You suck because you are an Extra!"?

I find that the people who hang on to their Advanced ticket (or who are sorry they upgraded!) are primarily those who don't use CW. Your profile says that your proudest accomplishment in amateur radio is passing your 5 and 13 wpm code tests. Yeah, I was proud of passing those tests (as well as the 20 wpm test), but I just viewed them as hurdles I needed to get over in order to earn additional privileges. In actuality, passing the Advanced written test was a much greater accomplishment than passing the code test!

After I got my General, I continued to sharpen my CW skills. By the time I sat for my 20 wpm code test, I was ready for it. That was nearly 20 years ago and now my "comfort zone" with CW is 30-35 wpm. I am sure those people who I talk to at that speed don't say, "I bet he is an ex-CBer" (which I am not) or "I bet he can't build a dipole" (which I can).

If you want people to admire you, look up to you, regard you in high esteem and really truly think of you as someone special, work on your CW and get your speed up and engage in a real conversation with someone.

But the bottom line is that if someone lumps me in the group of ex-CBers who can't build a dipole, so what? That's their problem, not mine! Personally, I enjoy having access to the entire amateur radio spectrum. Too bad that you don't!



 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by W6EIJ on August 31, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
Thank you - interesting post and fun reading about things I had long forgotten. My grandfather was a ham in the teens, and later became W2CRN - he had some very interesting stories of what it was like in the spark days.

Ham radio evolves but there will always be people to grouse about something.

K3FHP - "I earned my licences though advanced with 13wpm cw and testing in front of an FCC examiner, not someone studies a book for a month and goes to the ham down the street and is an EXTRA. I could easily pass the worthess exam but have resisted. I pass a 13wpm exam in front of an FCC examiner and the New Age Extra has no cw exam....in fact.....doesn't even know what morse letters are but gets to operate in the 25khz I am restricted from."

Well each to his own. I took the extra in 1978 with a 20wpm cw test in front of an FCC examiner like everyone else at that time. I'm sure there are lots of people today taking the modern extra exam who could have easily passed the one I took. But the modern exam is the only option for these younger people because many applicants were not even alive when the code test and the 2 year requirement were dropped.
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by N1DVJ on September 1, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
RE:"Do you really think someone is going to see that you hold an Advanced Class license and say, "Wow, he is someone really special because he passed a 13 wpm code test!""

YES.....I do....I was in the same boat.

So YES...the Advanced class IS something special!!!!
I should have never upgraded.

PS---Most new "Extras" can't build a damn dipole!!!
Bunch of CB'ers is all the new crowd is.
----------------------------------------------------
Wow, you sound like a cantankerous arrogant old f@rt!

Brain proud and always have to show it off. I'll bet you're just a charmer on the ham bands and at club meetings.

I've met hams like you. Arrogant and alway trying to be the technical 'wheel' in any discussion because they can shake their wrist with skill. While some of their skills may be worthy, I've also heard one of these 'extra wizzards' talking about cutting the 'lock' link on his first PLL rig because he thought it would open up more channels. Or a case where they were amazed at the discovery that a good alkaline battery lasted longer than his nicad.

Well, you may have specific knowledge that is more than the average ham, but it's more than likely in narrow spikes of application. Do you even know what a PLL is? Design one. Something a little harder? Dual-modulus prescaler? Can you design a PIN diode switcher?

Just because you feel superior to the CBers to me just indicates that's who you compare yourself to. And you belong back there.
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by KD5RGJ on September 1, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
WHO IS PATRICK COADY?
KD5RGJ
SPENCER HUDSON
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by N0IU on September 1, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
N8BOA was making a joke...

HE is Patrick Coady!
 
Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by AJ4CU on September 2, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
Very nice list however no mention at all of Nikola Tesla who demonstrated a radio controlled submarine long before the hack Marconi stole his patents....
It's a shame how little people either ignore or do not take the time to learn about this great man.

73 all
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by WX7G on September 2, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
Very good! Another addition would be the use of wireless telegraphy during the Anglo-Boer war, 1899-1902.
 
Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by W0CBF on September 2, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
Hasn't anything happened since 1998?
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by K4WGE on September 2, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
"Very nice list however no mention at all of Nikola Tesla who demonstrated a radio controlled submarine long before the hack Marconi stole his patents....
It's a shame how little people either ignore or do not take the time to learn about this great man."

Maybe the arrogance implicit in your remark explains the lack of interest among "the little people"?

I thought it was Edison who stole Tesla's ideas...

Tesla is called "The Father of RC" which is more connected to amateur radio than weapons systems.
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by N3HAM on September 2, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
Marconi a 'hack'? I'm sure the survivors of the Titanic wouldn't have thought so, along with those over the decades who have had their maydays answered.
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by N0IU on September 2, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
"Very nice list however no mention at all of Nikola Tesla..."

I have great admiration for Mr. Tesla. I just wish I could afford to buy one of his cars!
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by K4WGE on September 2, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
"It's a shame how little people either ignore or do not take the time to learn about this great man."

That sentence just begs for an edit. You mean to say it's a shame how little credit people have given to Tesla over the years.

 
Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by KE7AUB on September 3, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
Nice little list.

Add:

1927 - Washington Radio Conference. Amateur Radio Service recognized by International Treaty. U.S. Amateurs lose 2/3's of their frequencies, but the rest of the World's Amateurs get the 1/3 left, they never had to begin with.

1979 - WARC, yes, Amateurs got the WARC bands, but.. The UK actually got 7100-7300 removed from ITU Region 2 allocation. Then at the big vote to approve this de-allocation, ITU 2 Region members one by one asked for a footnote allowing their Amateurs to use 7100-7300. An entire ITU region was effectively in open rebellion. Never happened before.

The 7100-7300 de-allocation in ITU region 2 was dropped - hi hi..

Why would all ITU Region 2 Government Reps do this? They all recalled the invaluable service Amateur Radio played in the immediate aftermath of the Great Guatemalan Earthquake of 1976.
 
RE: Historical Events in Amateur Radio  
by N1DVJ on September 3, 2014 Mail this to a friend!
"I thought it was Edison who stole Tesla's ideas... "

From what I've read, there was a lot of bad blood between Tesla and Edison. Most of it centered on a comment Edison made that he's pay xxx dollars for something. Tesla turned around and did it. Edison then said it was an 'off hand' remark and he wasn't serious. Quite possible, but he kept the idea.

Tesla hated Edison. He later hooked up with Westinghouse and I've read that Tesla waived rights and royalties (worth millions, even back then) just to do things that would bury Edison. He won, we have AC, and the standard that Tesla designed at Niagra is STILL in use today. From what I understand, the actual generators are still in use.
 
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