eHam.net - Amateur Radio (Ham Radio) Community

Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net



[Articles Home]  [Add Article]  

A Century of Amateur Radio and the ARRL:

from The ARRL Letter on July 24, 2014
Website: http://www.arrl.org/
Add a comment about this article!

A Century of Amateur Radio and the ARRL:

During the decade of the 1960s and subsequently, Gus Browning, W4BPD, traveled the world and operated from over 100 countries, many of them extremely rare ones and sometimes the first ham operation for that country. Gus was an ordinary guy, always a gentleman, and an unflappable pileup operator. He was the first DXer elected to the DX Hall of Fame.

On December 12, 1961, OSCAR 1, the first Amateur Radio satellite, was launched into orbit. OSCAR 2 followed on June 2, 1962. Both paved the way for the amateur satellites that followed.

By 1963, the US ham population had reached a quarter of a million, although at that time there were more CB operators than hams.

During the 1960s, repeater operation began on 2 meters. At first, there was a fair amount of confusion -- questions of legality had to be sorted out by the FCC, a lot of hams thought channelized operation wasn't a good thing, equipment had to be developed, etc. But eventually things settled down, and repeater operation on 2 meters took off, with repeater operation on other VHF/UHF ham bands and 6 meters soon to follow.

On March 27, 1964, a magnitude 9.2 earthquake and the resulting tsunami http://redoubtreporter.wordpress.com/2012/08/29/radio-to-the-rescue-ham-operators-establish-link-with-world-after-earthquake/ struck Alaska and caused extensive damages in many parts of the state. As in most natural and man-made disasters, hams were quick to put together emergency communication links to help with disaster relief.

Late in 1967, incentive licensing returned to ham radio. This had been an on-again/off-again issue with FCC for about 15 years. -- Al Brogdon, W1AB

Source:

The ARRL Letter

There are no comments on this article: Post One

Email Subscription
My Subscriptions
Subscriptions Help

Other News Articles
IARU Region 3 and APT Agreement:
Breakall Sends Students on a 'Fox Hunt' to Learn Ham Radio:
Ham Radio Towers Stolen In Effort:
Amateur Radio Operators to Converge In Claremore on March 13-14:
YL 33: The First Female Ham Radio Operators, and Their Awesome Legacy: