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[Articles Home]  [Add Article]  

222 Mhz the missing band

(KF2OK) on August 7, 2002
View comments about this article!

Yaesu will soon be selling the new FT-897, a new HF plus 6, 2 meter and 430 multimode radio.

The 897 will join the ranks of the FT-100, FT 847, FT 817 and the Icom 706, providing amateurs with yet another choice of a "all mode all band radio". Whats wrong with this picture?? 

The ham community is forever so concerned that our ham bands are in danger of being taken over by commercial interests and rightly so. 

But where are the comments or outrage toward the manufacturers for constantly excluding OUR ham bands like 222, 902 and 1.2 gig?? 

Why?? Because no one uses 222 or that 222 is not used in Japan or Europe? Isn't the US a big enough market that the major manufacturers can add another band or two?? 

Look, its OUR bands that the FCC authorized us to use, yet we are at the mercy of Yaesu, Icom, Kenwood and the others. By the way, when was the last time you saw a brand new 222 Mhz multimode radio for sale?? Hey how about it Ranger, Ten-Tec ??? 

If one remembers it wasn't all that long ago that we lost parts of the 220 band to commercial interests, in part because the band was under utilized. 

A good explanation was that there were not many radios that covered the 220 band. Radios were expensive $ 300 and we are talking handheld.

Thankfully due to Alinco and Pryme there are affordable and readily avaible 222 FM handhelds and FM mobile rigs, but where are the multimode radios?

What can we do? 

Write to the manufacturers and tell them you want the bands that YOU are licensed for. You want the 222 band included next time, you want a radio that also covers 902 Mhz AND 1.2 gig, and tell them that you should not have to mortgage the house to buy their rigs either.  Look, its your money, but its your bands too. 

Don't you have a right to use them, before..... we lose them ?

Member Comments:
This article has expired. No more comments may be added.
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by KA1BQJ on August 7, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
You make an excellent point. I've always wondered...Why aren't the 220, 902Mhz, etc., bands included?

Yaesu, ICOM and Kenwood - take notice of this!

I purchased a new HT earlier this year - the THF6A from Kenwood. The overriding factor for my purchase was the inclusion of 220! I wondered if Kenwood was testing the waters when they decided to add in 220? It's about time we all start to ask, "Why", and the manufactures need start providing "complete" radios with the full spectrum for those of us wanting it. The technology is certainly available to do it.

Regards,
Tom / KA1BQJ
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by WD8MGO on August 7, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
I have to agree with the writer about 220Mhz.
220 has not been a priority with me for equipment.
The only two I have used were the little Kenwood 220 hand held from the mid-1980s and selling an IC-3AT for a friend(he had no interest in keeping his prize from a local hamfest). From a sellers point of view at a hamfest with used VHF, UHF or VHF MARINE. 220 does not sell as well or at all. It is almost like this band and equipment are the BLACK SHEEP of the ham bands.
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by WD8MGO on August 7, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
I have to agree with the writer about 220Mhz.
220 has not been a priority with me for equipment.
The only two I have used were the little Kenwood 220 hand held from the mid-1980s and selling an IC-3AT for a friend(he had no interest in keeping his prize from a local hamfest). From a sellers point of view at a hamfest with used VHF, UHF or VHF MARINE. 220 does not sell as well or at all. It is almost like this band and equipment are the BLACK SHEEP of the ham bands.
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by KB7ZFB on August 7, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Friends and I have long discussed the lack of 220MHz equipment. Most recently, the FT-8900 by Yaesu has once again skipped this band, and for what, 10M FM? From a design standpoint I would think that adding another VHF band would have been easier than an HF one. Not to mention there are only about 4 repeater pairs for 10M! Would anyone put a 10M whip on their vehicle just for that?

I seem to remember SoCal having quite a few 220MHz repeaters, including linked ones that cover multiple states - but I'd also like to see some affordable equipment that would offer some the modern features (remote mounting, memories, etc.) for use in today's vehicles. New 2M rigs can be bought for $150, but the only 220MHz ones are several years old and go for more than that no matter how beat up they are!
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by KC2IEL on August 7, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
As we know the VX7 has an attempt at 222 Mhz. I guess the manufacturers don't feel that the increased costs of adding another band to be worth it.

I currently don't own any units that work on 222 Mhz, but I've heard from others that it has a lower noise floor than 2m or 70 cm/ less intermod, gets out of buildings better than 2m & isn't easily monitored by the casual scanner listener (when's the last time you saw 222 Mhz on a low cost scanner?). It has been suggested that this would make an ideal frequency for ARES/RACES/EMCOMM. Let's keep the band alive - use it or loose it!
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by KC7LSP on August 7, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
One member said, "...lower noise floor than 2m..." and, "... isn't easily monitored by the casual scanner listener" Music to my ears.

I've always LOVED a quiet simplex frequency to talk to friends. I might add my wife likes the radio quiet, period. :) I usually stay away from repeaters. A good 2m/220 rig would really make me a happy camper.
 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by KB0NLY on August 7, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
After reading all the comments here i too have really been awe struck a tthe thought of 222. Come to think of it i haven't seen any scanners for sale in any local electronics stores that cover the band. And i sure don't see many used 222 radios available, guess the band just never was made use of in my area. I would think it would be a very nice band to chat on, being that there wouldn't be every scanner owner in town listening to you talk about your latest radio or antenna purchase (a friend got a new 2m/440 mobile stolen from his car cause some scanner listeners heard him talking about it) and the intermod point i can see also.
 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by N9HRJ on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
I think the problem with 220, at least since I have been a ham is "Why?"

First, let me state that I'm not trying to be arrogant. I agree that the lack of equipment on 220 is a problem, but even if there were all-mode equipment available, I'm not sure anyone would scramble to buy it.

Most people above 50Mhz are operating FM voice, and FM voice sounds pretty much the same regardless of frequency. Most people I talk to about 220 simly shrug their shoulders and say "Why would I use it?"

Remember the 220 bumper stickers "220 MHZ...use it"?

Why? Why use 220? Just because it's there? Why simply use the 1.25 meter band just to make a contact? Why not 2m?

2m is our VHF band, 440 is our UHF. 440 makes sense since it is used for sattelite, ATV, etc. But 220 puzzles me.

Again, I'm not trying to be a jerk. Whn I first became a Ham, in the late 80's, 220 was a hot topic and we lost some spectrum. Now 222 MHZ is the low end of the band. Over the years, through a lot of discussions, the "Why" argument I'd heard over and over again became my own.

Maybe you guys could shed some light on why to use 222. The only argument I have ever heard FOR using 222 was simply "use it or loose it". But, my problem is, I'm not going to buy another rig just for 220.

If the big three made 2m/220/440 rigs, would I use 220? Probably, but that would mean extra costs too, and we already have an expensive hobby.

Anyway, I'm not trying to start a war here, but I am curious to hear what you guys think. I can think of a million reasons to use 1.2 GHZ vs. 2.4 GHZ (i.e. building penetration), or reasons to use 900. (lots of space for ATV freeing up 440, etc) But I can't think of a single reason to use 220 vs 144!

Help me out!

-Bill
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by N9AJA on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
It's sad to say, but it's a simple case of supply and demand...the only shred of memory that any of us hold from those days in high school economics class.

Remember when DVD players first came out (generally about 3 years ago)? They were expensive and there weren't many DVDs available. There were very few stores that rented DVD movies, too, much less sold them. As a consumer owning a DVD player at the time it was ideal: if a video store actually DID rent DVDs, there was little competition for the newly released movies since so few people had a DVD player.

Two things happened because of this scenario: (1) As more people bought the high-priced DVD players the prices started to drop and there was more media available. Now the use of DVD players is widespread and is arguably the new standard. (2) The previous widespread format, VHS video tapes, is now much cheaper, both the player/recorders and the media.

This same thing happened with LP records and CDs about 15 years ago, and this same thing will happen with our televisions of today and HDTVs of tomorrow.

So how do these scenarios relate to the discussion of the 1.25m band? When hams start buying and using 220 MHz equipment, the price for radios will start to drop. "Early" adopters (in the modern sense) will enjoy barren bands (like on 440 in many locales) until these bands become active after many people purchase usable rigs. There is a direct relationship of the amount of activity to the price & availability of equipment.

So what is to stop the lack of use of 220 presently from becoming a relatively high traffic band like 2m? It's not really the price of equipment...it's the availability. It's like a stand-off between hams and the manufacturers...hams don't want to pay the high price and the manufacturers don't want to take the chance making radios that hams won't buy. Their likelihood of losing money in such a venture is much higher than any hope of making money. This stalemate will prevent 220 from becoming what it should be.

There are several 220 repeaters in my area, and most do not use CTCSS tones...there's no need. And that's a bonus if you want to use the old rock-bound rigs (crystal) like the many Midlands floating around out there. Some of the clubs put their autopatch on their 220 repeater since it sees little use and is more "private". And the 1.25m band is a great band for local area coverage, enjoying both the benefits of the 2m band and the 70cm band.

My advice: we should start using 220 as much as we can. Look for old rigs at hamfests...even if it's a crystal rig. Dig out those 220 radios that you have lying around from days gone by and fire them up. Start out by scheduling contacts. Then run a net and publicize it with all of the area clubs within range of the repeater. 220 can also be a great option for use in emergency communications when a "private" band/frequency is sought.

73,
Rob/N9AJA
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by N2RWE on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
I do, for the most part also blame the manufacturers for not including 220 in more radios. But lest us not forget that they have tried in the past, rather unsuccessfully. Icom made the IC-3AT, which wasn't exactly a best seller. That was followed up by the IC-3SAT, again not a best seller, but these babies fetch a good $150+ 10 years after they were made on e-Bay (I have a couple, anyone want one?). The SAT line was re-vamped once again in the early 90's the the P-series HT, and the P3AT being the 220 version which really didn't sell well (These are hard to find now).

But Icom didn't limit themselves to mono-band HT's either. They also made a rather wierd-looking trio of dual-band HT's, the WxxAT series. The W21AT was the traditional 2m/440, but the V21AT sported 2m/220 and again wasn't a very hot seller, despite having 2 meters. (The X21AT was 440/1.2)

I applaud Kenwood for the TH-F6A.. This radio is selling like hotcakes which I hope Kenwood takes as a sign that they're doing something right. The funny thing around here is that I know several people who bought this little HT, and most of them mentioned 220 at 5 watts as one of the main reasons for purchasing it. Hmmm.. That is a strong statement here considering there are only two 220 repeaters within a 75 mile radius of town. As soon as I sell off my collection of mono-band HT's I too will make the jump to the F6. I use 220 now, and plan on continuing to do so.

The bottom line is that both the 220MHz and 902MHz band don't stand much of a chance of ever being widely used unless the major manufacturers start including these bands into their so-called All-Band tranceivers.

FYI: Ten-Tec does make a 220MHz mobile radio kit which looks rather interesting and may make for a good winter project.
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by N2NFG on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
I have to agree with Bill, N9HRJ. Why? The way I see it, 2 meters is underpopulated. I travel between the Raleigh NC area and the Hudson River Valley of NY several times a year. I can either take the I-95 route through many major metropolitan areas, or go up through West Virginia and PA. Either way, I can raise at LEAST 30 repeaters. In the six years I have been traveling these routes, I have had perhaps ten QSOs. Thats right, TEN. Repeated calls on .52 simplex have NEVER netted a QSO! Seems that folks on 2 meter repeaters really don't want to talk to outsiders traveling through, or else they just aren't monitoring the frequency. Either way, I haven't noticed an over population on 2 meters, and why oh why would I want a radio capable of 220 when I can't even raise a QSO on 2 meters? In the heavily populated Raleigh area, there are several 2 meter repeaters to chose from. They get pretty heavy use at the usual drive times, but there doesn't seem to be a line of folks waiting to get in. Why pay for another VHF band to talk to the same people you can easily talk to on 2 meters? OK, you say, but what you want is an all mode radio that covers 220. Again, I ask, why? In our local club, many of the members have purchased the Yeasu 847. Outside of satellite QSOs, established 2 meter nets, or skeds, random SSB contacts are a rare occurance unless it's a contest weekend or a really big band opening. Which brings us around to the really serious VHF/UHF operator. Most of these guys use transverters hooked up to high end HF rigs. Big antennas on big towers. Yet one of the members of the local chapter of PVRC (a contest club)recently sold off all of his high tech VHF/UHF equipment. (yes, 220 also). Why? He said he was tired of pouring money into a black hole. We have to ask ourselves if we really even need 220. The honest answer is...probably not. 2 meters and 440 are under used as it is. 73, Bob
 
222 Mhz -- Bigger Question -- All Mode VHF/UHF Rad  
by INITZERO on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Before I run too far off-topic, let me agree with
KB7ZFB on the new Yaesu FT-8900...

http://www.yaesu.com/amateur/ft8900.html

Why on earth did they put 10M in that radio? I'm not
a big Yaesu fan (Kenwood and Icom are my friends) but
I would have driven over to AES and bought that rig
the day it was released if they had stuck 220 mHz,
900mHz *or* (not and) 1.2 gHz in place of 10M. (In
Florida, 220mHz and 1.2 gHz are viable bands though
there isn't much 900mHz that I've found.)

Why can't the manufactures see that there are many
hams in the United States that have no interest in
HF and are unlikely to ever upgrade past Tech? Lots
of those hams (me included) would spend loads on
50mHz+ gear if it was there to buy.

(I'm a tech who has passed the General written exam
and am studying for the Extra written exam but have
no interest in learning code nor using HF. That was
not bait for a code discussion, by the way, just a
note that I'm really only interested in VHF/UHF. God
bless those who like HF and can pound brass at 45
words a minute.)

Techs can only buy so many dual-band FM rigs. If the
manufactures want to sell us more stuff, they have got
to offer us more toys on which to spend money... which
brings me to today's complaint...

I think there is only one VHF/UHF rig currently in
production that is all-mode, the Icom IC-910H. Sure,
there are a handful of HF/VHF/UHF rigs that have all
modes included but then I am stuck paying for a bunch
of functionality that I will never use.

If they can put 160M-1.2gHz in an all-mode rig
(Kenwood's TS-2000), why can't they put 50mHz-1.2gHz
in an all-mode rig? (Not much point in going higher
since above that you'll probably be using transverters
at the antenna anyway.)

If the IC-910H had 6M, 220 mHz, 900mHz and 1.2 gHz,
in addition to 2M and 70CM, I'd buy it tomorrow at its
current price point ($1,200 compared to the TS-2000's
$1,800). However, for just 2M and 70CM, it's not worth
the $1,200 going rate.

To the manufactures... Give me something to spend
money (other than the same old dual-band rig) on and
I will.

Matt (k4mls)
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by K5LXP on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
The reason is very simple. The overriding issue with the manufacturers is the 220 band is only a north american allocation. Hams in the USA aren't the only customers they build equipment for, in order to recoup the costs of developing and marketing product, it needs to be saleable in all markets. I don't think the Kenwood tribander with 220 is going to be a big hit in europe or asia. The same issue also applies to all the "DC-daylight" rigs out there like the Icom 706. Technically you could probably make these type of radios work on 220, but the added component, development and certification costs to incorporate 220 in those rigs can't be justified for the limited market they can be sold in. And all of that component cost and development effort is wasted for units sold outside the U.S., serving only to make the unit more expensive. So, unless you can convice a radio manufacturer they're going to sell many thousands of units in the U.S. alone, you're not going to see much 220 gear. My guess is their market research agrees with me.

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
k5lxp@arrl.net
 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by WB2WIK on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
The market is pretty small, as experimental marketing has determined time and again. I've been on 135cm since the mid-1960's, originally using an American-made Gonset Communicator IV (quite a nice rig, but "AM" only). I also had a Tecraft 6360 20W transmitter and companion receiving converter, and used that for a while, and on and on. I currently have the 220 MHz module in my Yaesu FT736R, one of the only mulitmode rigs ever made to work 220 MHz CW/SSB/FM all in one rig. Thousands and thousands of FT736R's were sold over a period of more than ten years, and Yaesu said they could almost count on one hand how many 220 MHz modules were sold.

I think it's true that 2m, which has propagation essentially identical to 135cm, is underused and 220 MHz access is almost a needless frill. I can tune across the 2m band in New York City, Chicago, Dallas, Orlando or Los Angeles (as I do, frequently) and hear perhaps 10% of all simplex and repeater frequencies with any activity, at any time of day or night.

10m FM, on the other hand, is actually quite "packed," and when the band opens, as it regularly does, the few repeater channels, plus the 29.6 MHz calling frequency, are so loaded with activity it's impossible to tell what's going on.

I'd like to see more equipment available for 135cm, but based on past marketing it just doesn't seem widely accepted, even when readily available.

BTW, the "adding 220 is easy" theory isn't true. Unfortunately, most of the power amplifying devices used in VHF-UHF amateur gear today are thick film hybrids, or modules, which are designed for about 20% overall operating bandwidth, about all that's achievable without a lot of feedback and very poor efficiency. So, currently, the Toshiba and other popular hybrid power amplifier modules available don't cover 220 MHz, at all. I think there's a 220 MHz ICOM-specific module. It's likely to be expensive, since it would be manufactured in far smaller quantities than the 150 and 450 MHz modules. "Economy of scale" in manufacturing is definitely a concern, which is why most 220 MHz equipment always has been more expensive than similar gear for 2m or 70cm.

WB2WIK/6
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by W8MMQ on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
I own the ADI line of mobile radios, the AR-147 (2m) the AR-247 (220) and the AR-447 (440). These are very affordable radios, and they are not bad units. Very similar in operation and performance to the equivalent Kenwoods. The 220 band is a nice band to operate, often quiet, and it is similar to two meters, propogation-wise. It really is a shame there isn't more equipment out there. But, when it comes right down to it, I believe that it is definately an economic issue. These large companies (corporations) are in the business to make money. They sell their radios and the designs around the world. When the United States is one of the only (or the only?) country with the 220 amateur band, they do not see this as very profitable.
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by KC7LSP on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
I'm afraind you guys are right about the economics of the situation. We have to face reality. Ham Radio is a dying hobby. The younger kids are into cellphones and the Internet. Old fashioned radio does not get them excited as it's not "cutting edge" anymore.

With roughly 650,000 licensed amateurs in the US, and not all of them active or even operating on VHF, what small percentage of them would buy a 220 rig?

I guess it's take what we can get and love it.

 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by KA9OKT on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
"What can we do?"

Build your own! We're hams! We studied all the electronics theory to get our license. There are construction articles in the ARRL handbook, QST and many other magazines. You don't even have to design it yourself! QST May 2001 has instructions on how to modify a Tentec 1210 to work on 222 Mhz. July 93 QEX has an article about a 222 transverter. January 1990 QST has one also.

It's time to warm up your soldering irons and get to work. Don't blame the manufacturers. If a band is underutilized, we're the ones to blame.

73
Jay
KA9OKT
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by WB8NUT on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
I never did understand why the rat shack did not go after 6, 220, etc. They have the ability to produce a very low cost rig and mass market it. Rigs like this at the right price would blow out and more people would jump on board. I also suggested to RS that they make other single band HF rigs like the 10 meter rig they had. Single band at $150 would blow out. No real ingenuity among the ham manufacturers.
 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by KB0NLY on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
I have to agree with WB8NUT, if the rat shack would offer some more radios it would give some of us budget bound ham's a big break. I used to own a rat shack 2m and a 70cm mobile, eventually sold them to another new ham and moved on to yaesu and icom and so forth. There was nothing wrong with them, affordable and dependable, sure some of the specs weren't up to the par of the big three, but then the price was nearly half of the big three also. It would have been nice to see radio shcak come out with a 6m radio!

 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by AB0TJ on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Here's how I see it... It's kinda a loose-loose situation, because, nobody uses 220 and others because "nobody else does". And the manufactures don't put 220 and others in the rigs because nobody uses it, so it's a downward spiral and one of the two groups are going to have to stop the spiral: us or them. The problem with that is, there is no incentive for us to stop it because it just plain costs too much. So, maybe we can try to get the big three to include 220 and others in future rigs, then useage will increase, and then more manufactures will put 220 and others in the rigs, so now the spiral is reversed. Useage of SSB on 2 meters have risen quite a bit because people buy rigs like the Icom 746 and they use it 'because it's there'.

Just my take on it. Hopefully reps from the big three (and other companies) will read this.
And, note, when I say 'nobody', I don't really mean nobody, just a smaller group of the ham community. And, I'm not saying that they don't count... you get my point :-)

73,
Alex AB0TJ
 
RE: 222 Mhz -- Bigger Question -- All Mode VHF/UHF  
by KG4PTZ on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Amen brother!! 10M FM is a joke, at best. I was going to get one of those 8900's, but when I found there was no AM or SSB, I laughed heartily and moved on. Around here in central VA, 2M is heavily used (just listen to the 147.075 machine if you don't believe me), but 440 is almost dead, except for a few links to 2M machines. Most folks don't even mention 222 as a ham band. Most of the lower part of the old 220-221.9999MHz region of this band is already eaten up with little portable CW transmitters, mounted to the collars of many of our state dogs (American foxhounds). So, yes, someone is using this band, but no it is not the ham community. Regarding those multiband all-mode rigs, bring it on, but get ready to make a nice new antenna tuner, unless you want to drive a porcupine-car. Meanwhile, I shall now study CW to get down on HF.
73,
Kenny Lewis, Jr.
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by JJ1BDX on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Just to clarify that Japanese hams do want all bands as North Americans do - 222MHz is surely one of them, as well as 3575 or up to 3900kHz, 7100-7300 kHz, 146-148MHz, 420-430 and/or 440-450MHz, or whatever legally not authorized here. The issue is that adding 222MHz and 900MHz bands for transmission is not an easy thing to do for a ready-made transceiver.

I agree with an opinion that Japanese vendors need to research what the ham radio market in North America really needs, but I think it's a matter of the production cost.

73 de JJ1BDX/3 Kenji Rikitake
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by KB9YUR on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Instead of 222, how about a simple 6 & 2m HT with SSB capabilities for under $300 ?!?
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by N9DG on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
The 222 MHz band situation is but one good example of how the amateur radio equipment manufactures are leading the radio buying populace around by the nose. First they foist an ever increasing number of totally mediocre RF performing rigs upon us for all the bands. Then they convince many that bells and whistles alone are all you need in order to have a ďgoodĒ radio. The radio manufactures can do this simply because many Hams donít demand better, they equate bells and whistles with good performance, which is more often than not totally untrue. If ham radio buyers were more demanding of better basic RF performance the manufacture would build them, until then they wonít, same for 222 MHz gear.

So what to do about getting on 222? First donít wait for the major gear makers to come up with something, they wonít, instead go out and buy a transverter in an either a kit or pre-assembled form, yes they do exist, Down East Microwave for example. You can even modify the existing Ten Tec 2M unit to go on 222 with minimal work. But be careful because you may suddenly find that MODERN transverters will out perform most of those all band wonder boxes by a significant margin, provided they are coupled to a good IF radio. Iím actually in the process of converting to all transverters for 6M and up SSB/CW/etc. weak signal work, simply because of their superior RX RF performance. Yes it is a bit more work to get the station on the air with transverters but it is worth it. It can change that nearby 60 dB over S9 signal that seemingly covers 20KHz of the band into one that is in reality only 3-4 KHz or so wide. Yes many of the multiband / multimode radios do get crunched that bad!

While 222 weak signal part of the maybe pretty quiet much of the time it is still well worth effort of get onto if your are into VHF contesting. For me 222 MHz only trails 432 MHz by a grid or two and perhaps a handful of QSOís, using roughly comparable power, feedlines, and antennas. Also during 2M tropo openings and VHF contests there will be many people asking if you have 222 and/or above.

It is also important not base your perceptions about any given VHF/UHF bandís activity level on the FM part of the band alone. Put up a horizontal polarized antenna with a modest amount of gain and get on SSB/CW you will find an entirely different world that you will rarely hear with that omnidirectional vertical and FM. So yes there are ways to get onto 222 if you look for them rather than waiting for them to come to you.

 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by KB9IGG on August 8, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
we as hams have told icom in person at dayton.they said in japan 220 is the police band.yes it would be great to have allmode 220 rig.i use 220 it is an excellent band no intermod,
 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by WB2WIK on August 9, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
220's a good weak-signal band, but not better than two meters, which is already underpopulated virtually everywhere in North America.

The "no intermod" comment had to be from someone who doesn't live very close to a Channel 13-TV transmitter! I have (lived close), and it takes no end of very high-Q notch filters to get rid of Channel 13's video...but it was worth it, and made the band very usable.

WB2WIK/6
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by K0RGR on August 9, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
I've always enjoyed 222 Mhz.. Years ago a friend and I did a lot of experimenting with 222 vs. 146 vs. 440.
We had a repeater with co-located 2, 220, and 440 repeaters. We found many differences in propagation and coverage between the three bands. Overall, 220 Mhz. often performed better than either 2 meters or UHF. At 222 Mhz, the RF is more easily reflected in deep canyons or urban environments, and not absorbed as much as at 440 or higher. I've observed many situations where tropo ducting was much stronger on 222 than on 2 meters. I've never worked aurora on 220 though - it's very rare. So, except for aurora, I've found 222 propagation is often better than 2 meters.
The increased topo ducting would probably be a curse here in the Midwest if we had lots of 222 machines.

Sadly, our local club sold the only 220 repeater in the vicinity a few years ago due to lack of use, and it has disappeared into someone's garage, off the air. After lots of thought, I decided to concentrate my limited VHF time on 2 and 6 meters, which are both under-utilized. When the time comes to get back on 222, I'll probably start with an FM rig and add a kit transverter.

73, K0RGR
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by WB2GMK on August 9, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Puh-leeze, guys, stop grousing about this topic like a bunch of anti-business, leftist bolshevics. The manufacurers do not make many 220 MHz radios because not many of us buy them. Simple. Supply and demand. Grade school economics. It's not a social or political statement when Yaesu or Kenwood decide not to lose money on manufactring a bunch of 220 radios very few of us will buy. Its a simple business decision. Look, in Limey-land, they have an allocation at 70 MHz. How stupid would it be if all the British hams started pissing and moaning that Ten-Tec doesn't make anything that covers 70 MHz. Grow up, guys. The business of business is to make money. If you want a damn 220 radio and you can't find a commercial model, make one yourself. We're HAMs dammit, this is what we do. This is how I feel, even though I'm a confirmed "appliance operator" who hasn't smelled solder in 20 years.
 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by KC9AIE on August 10, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Alot of you make many good points. In my oppinion, yes, the manufacturers should make radios that cover 50mhz-1.2, however I believe they should come out with a series of mono banders (even HT's). I'm only 13 years old, and have been licensed for a year, and even tho i'm about to upgrade to get on the HF bands, I still havent had a chance to try much of any of the numerous options available on VHF/UHF. Believe it or not, Field day was the only time i've ever transmitted off of 2m. I got about 5 minutes on our 6m radio, but other than that it was HF. I'm especially interested in 900mhz, but with a very tight budget (as you may imagine) it seems untill they come out with a series of mono band vhf or Uhf rigs, i'm stuck with 2m FM and HF.
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by K2ANE on August 10, 2002 Mail this to a friend!

To be honest I was not thorough in reading all the comments so far written on this subject. Therefore please indulge my observations if they have already been mentioned.
<p>
Back in the late 1980's there was a successful raid on the first 2 megs of 220. The coup was pulled off after all comments and filings (of which I was one of the over 5,000 respondents) were due to the FCC by all interested parties as to the fate of the band. As you may recall, several, I think 6 months past that deadline, a former FCC commissioner, name long forgotten, was enlisted by UPS (Unite Parcel Service) to lobby the FCC and successfully cut that 2 meg chunk away from Hams forever. This new segment was to enable UPS to maintain digital communications with its delivery vans in major metropolitan areas.
<p>
The so-called bargain agreed upon was that Hams would receive the rest of the 220 band as a "Primary User" of the remaining 3 meg segment. Also recall at that time the FCC came up with Novice Enhancement which allowed Novice operators to have voice privileges for a portion of the remaining band. I had one excited novice two miles away from me who could not wait to get on 220. Since he had no one else to talk to, I purchased two Kenwood TS-3525's and two Ringos for that exchange.
<p>
After a few weeks of wearing out the airwaves between us he lost interest. However there was an abundance of 220 machines in the Northern New Jersey area I found myself dabbling in. Then I too lost interest and maintained most of my local contacts on 2 meters.
<p>
I think the deal for Novice enhancement was also an attempt to generate interest and raise the number count of those using 222 and up. That goal slowly sunk into the noise level. Also the hopeful spinoff was to increase the number of Hams overall. To this day I do not know how many hams there really are in this country. No one is obligated to notify the FCC of SK status. Certainly 222 can no longer be counted upon to increase those numbers.
<p>
As I write this, I have an Icom 03AT sitting next to me, with an external collinear antenna, here on my mountaintop in New York State. I have been trying for weeks to hear another human voice. So far I have had only one contact with a repeater 25 miles away and that was with the control op. So 222 is going to be a dry run for me. I gave it the old college try.
<p>
It is not my fault no one is listening or using the band. Personally I think the actual numbers of hams living and operating is far below the critical mass of numbers necessary for bringing that band back to life. From what I read here it is also a national phenomena on other frequency allotments as well. Though my memory is a bit hazy on this I believe in the old days of the late 50's, the CB band was touted to be considered for the 220 band. Instead it wound up on the 11 meter band. Interesting luck of the draw if you ask me.
<p>
I'm of a mindset now that if the balance of the 222 band can be converted to commercial use and create jobs for daddy's to put food on the table for their kids, then by all means let it happen. As for a viable ham band, those glory days are long gone.
<p>
de K2ANE/2
<p>
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by WD8MGO on August 11, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
From what I have read in various commercial radio magazines. Both SEA and Midland have large investments in the commercial use of the 220Mhz band. SEA even has their 220Mhz radio on their website.
Considering commercial interests seem to be running the FCC at the present time. I forsee the day when Amateur Radio will probably lose out to such commercial interests. It is only a matter of time and at what price.
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by KF2OK on August 12, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Thanks for all your comments, Once we loose a band, we will never get it back. What is next after 222 is gone?? 902 Mhz? 2.4 ? maybe 430 because "its not used as much as 2 meters"?
If no one gives a damn about the frequencies because "they don't use them " we will loose them. You think hams only read these forums? So do the commercial interests.
........Some issues I wish to address................
Transverters...... Down east sells a transverter for 222 at $ 395, the no code tech wanting to get on 222 SSB will have to cough up over $ 500. A used 10 meter rig for $ 100 plus $ 400 to get on 222 SSB. Ouch!
SSBUSA , the price is $ 890 for their 222 transverter! super ouch! Why are transverters for 222 expensive? Its not because its 222...read on.
How is it that manufacturers can produce those FRS radios that operate at 467 mhz and sold and used in the US only and yet those same manufacturers can constantly exclude 222 and 902 from ham rigs I'll never understand that one!
.....................Why 222?..................
First 222 FM is actually LESS EXPENSIVE, than 440 FM. Yes you read that right, HRO ( summer 2002 catalog)sells the DR-235 222 mobile FM rig for $ 249.95, the ( 440 Mhz FM) DR-435 is $289.95. The DJ-296T 222 handheld is $ 189.95 , however the DJ-496 T 440 handheld is $ 199.95. even the ADI AR-247 222 is $ 15 less than the AR 447 440.
( You mean to tell me Yaesu couldnt have added 222 for only $200 extra to their new 897? You are going spend over $1000 on a radio that has the same frequencies as the the FT 100, 847 and IC 706-2G, 746 ? It dont make sense, unless you add some extra frequencies... am I missing something here? )
222 is the only band that all hams can use including
Novices.
222 beam antennas are smaller than 2 meters, yet 222 almost has the same propagation as 2 meters. 222 is used as a packet backbone relay in some areas.
.................... Ideas.................
222 could be designated as a national secondary emergency band for point to point communications for disasters, 222 would have been a excellent secondary band on 9/11.. if there would have been more radios out there. This idea alone could save 222.
For the VHF/UHF contests, give higher scores to 222 and 902, this would encourage more use, and more demand for equipment.
The manufacturers are missing out on the no code techs who do not wish to upgrade, there IS a untapped market for 50,144,222,440,902,1200 all mode base/mobile radio. Yes why pay for HF if you dont plan to use it.
I wrote to Ranger asking them to make a 222 multimode radio, I told them they would have the market all to themselves and they could target their radio to all the FT100 and 706 owners. I never did get a reply to my email.
I have questions, can the FT 100 be modified for 222 multimode? Can a 222 FM be retrofitted for SSB/CW? How much? You can buy a new 222 mobile for $ 209 ( AR-247), if you can modify it for $ 100 for SSB/CW it would be a heck of deal.
Thanks again for all your comments, write to the manufacturers and tell them what you think. Money talks, they will listen. ex KF2OK now NN2G
 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by WD8OKN on August 12, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
My plan is to purchase two 220Mhz rigs soon, where my wife and I can use them locally while I travel around the area. Since the band is dead, I'll be able to have rather open communication.
 
RE: 222 Mhz is alive and well In Northern Virginia  
by KE4SKY on August 12, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
While 222 isn't as lively as 2 meters in Northern Virginia, the 224.100- W4YHD machine in Fairfax, Virginia has a devoted following among users of what we like to call "the family channel - No LIDS, No kids"

The machine covers the entire DC metro area around the I-495 Beltway and down I-95 from just south of Baltimore down the Potomac almost to Fredericksburg, most of Prince William County, parts of Fauquier near Warrenton, north into Montgomery Co., Maryland and most of Frederick, Loudoun and Clarke Counties in Virgnia west to I-81.

There are several other good 220 machines in the DC area, and while not overpopulated with users, the regulars like them that way. Don't change a thing.

Most of the users are couples and families, and we rarely and occasionally use 220 for RACES purposes to keep the 2 meter repeaters available for the majority of users.
 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by KF2OK on August 12, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
If you really want privacy, get the Alinco DR-235 and the EJ-40U DIGITAL voice mode module in each radio.
 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by N1VLQ on August 12, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
It's my hope that the answer to this dilema is the development of software based radio's like the Ten-Tec Jupiter. If this becomes a viable technology, both from a technical standpoint as well as an economic one, then perhaps we'll eventually have better access to 220 and 902 in the future. It certainly makes sense, if you can add it via software, rather than hardware, the net cost will be much more manageable, but, of course, the radio will be more expensive on the front end.... probably a decent trade-off, if they can make it work above HF. Here's hoping Ten-Tec can deliver this for us.
73
Bruce, N1VLQ
 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by WB5R on August 12, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Speaking as a owner of a 220 repeater for the last 20 years I would like to second the "no lids, no kids" statement. In my opinion, the less the general ham populace knows about 220, the better. It isn't missing, it is being utilized, not advertised.

In this area, all the repeater owners get on 220 and talk about the users on the other bands.

When you are in West Texas, check in on 224.82, be glad to rag chew with you.
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by KD5RFT on August 12, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
222 and 902 are right where they should be -- specialty rigs. using the repeater guide approach to vhf+ band usage, 222 is half as thich as 6m. i'm sure there are a few die-hard hams who will use this as the new elite-440.. nothing wrong with that.. it's just the 2nd least popular by that standard.

902... who wants it?!? it's shared with the personal communications band... that means consumer gadgets from cordless phones to i'm too irresponsible to watch my kid keychain locators use it... hell, we might even get arrested by the gengrich wireless privacy act for following arrl's listen before talk protocol

1.2 gig -- nothing wrong with this, very big in california and metro areas.. kenwood quad-band ht uses like 6m, 2m, 70cm, and 1.2G... if it came with lithium i'd get it to be a 5W HT...

if i get a lithium model, it'll probably be the kenwood 2m, 222, 70cm.. 2 most utilized repeter bands and the new elite-222 for bragging rights until a 3rd party jumps in the ragchew and goes... 222 ain't worth a ______

KD5RFTurkey
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by KB1IKE on August 14, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Hams USED to build their own gear!
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by NE0P on August 14, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
First, to correct a misconception-222 is not a US only band, or a North American Only band, It is a region 2 band. It is also used in South America-just go check your current repeater directory to see that there are repeaters on 222 in South America.

As to why do we need 222 when we have 2 and 432-well, why do we need 12 meters, when we have 10 and 15. I have yet to make a QSO on 12 meters where we could not have completed on 10 or 15 at the same time. I think the same could be said for 60 meters, and look how much the ARRL is screaming about that band. And do you think that 137 KHZ has any usable propogation characteristics?

Been doing lots of WSJT meteor scatter the past few days with the Perseids shower, and see that 222 is working very well for many hams for meteor scatter. I am not currently on 222, but was for a few years with a FT736 (BTW, the FT847 is a complete embarrassment as a update to the FT736). It is a fun band, and probably works better than 2 meters since the antennas are physically smaller. Also, why do we really need 2 meter FM? We could do all of the local work on 6 meter FM instead, and get band openings to boot.

Hams are supposed to be adventerous and on the forefront of discovery. We should be exploring every band we can, and we still may discover some new propogation mode which works better on 222 than any other band.
 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by KC7LSP on August 14, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Someone wrote:
>Hams USED to build their own gear!

Yeah, and back in those good old days every town had a radio and TV repair shop or two, where you could easily go for parts. When is the last time Radio Shack carried anything you really needed?

Back in those good old days, buying the parts and building your own was also cheaper than buying a consumer rig.

Back in those wonderful days a guy did not need logic probes, O-scopes, magnifying lenses and other assorted SPENDY items just to cobble together a homebrew rig.

I might also mention those old-timers were making HF rigs, NOT VHF gear (like we are talking about here) that requires a heck of a lot more shielding and attention to design to prevent interference and other problems.

In short, Hams used to do a lot of things. They also used to use CW 100% of the time too It's much easier to make one of those HF CW rigs than a FM voice rig on VHF.

Next time someone says, "Hams used to do...", I think I'm going to barf.
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by KN0V on August 15, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Why is 222 mhz the missing band? Good question. I've been wondering about that for many years now. A few years back, 222 was under attack by business interests
such as UPS, etc. If I remember correctly we did lose
part of the band. It is difficult to defend amateur allocations when there isn't activity. Maybe a manufacturers rep can chime in and explain why. But I'm
not going to hold my breath either. Like the saying goes, use it or lose it. At this rate, we will lose it.
I'm surprised we haven't already.
 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by N4JCS on August 15, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Regarding K5LXP: Hams in Europe and Asia never see the Kenwood TH-F6A, since it is not sold there. Instead, Kenwood sells a model called the TH-F6E, which is essentially the 'F6A without the 220 Band. It is being touted in the UK mainly as a scanner, with 2 Meters and 70CM as extra added attractions.
 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by KB7WSD on August 15, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Mostly thinking about N9AJA's response... I would have to reply that 222 is "the band" that we need to be thinking about because 1) 2M is getting pretty crowded. Repeater pairs are tough to find in many areas (at least on the West coast), 2) it is quiet and not nearly as busy as 2m or 440mhz, 3) it has penetration characteristics more like 440 as opposed to 2M and has range more like 2m with less of a power requirement than 440 (my ht display usually dims when I transmit on 440 at high power... sucks that battery down.), 4) it can be used for remote links or control. I'm sure there are more reasons than just these four.

As to equipment avalibility, manufacturers are loathe to take risks when they can simply put more bells and frills on existing designs. Consumers have to demand a product to have it become avalible. There are many untapped markets. Demand does not ensure that a product will be made. I do suspect that If a manufacturer made a multimode 222 radio it would sell well. The responses to this thread suggest a great interest in 222.

As for a call to use 222, Amen! Maybe that software based radio design published in QST last year could be adapted to 222? That would be cool!
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by KF2OK on August 16, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Check out Emil Pocock's column in the August 2002 QST, he too addresses the 222 subject. He mentions that Icom produced the IC-375A a all mode 220, 25 watt radio sometime ago.
Your comments could make a difference! You might wish to contact Ranger, Ten Tec and MFJ in addition to Alinco, Pryme, ADI, Icom, Yaesu and Kenwood. Mention this forum and forward it to them along with your comments, get people from your local ham radio club to write in. Our bands are at stake, whether or not you use them!. Read somewhere that 222 in Canada is in trouble.
If you can buy a new ADI 222 mobile for $ 209 ( AR-247), how much more would it cost ADI to make it a all mode?
To me it seems a no brainer, imagine being a manufacturer and you are able to have the market all to yourself, and being able to target the FT 100, FT 817, FT 847, FT 897, Icom 706, 746 and Kenwood TS 2000 owners with a all mode radio that fills in that missing band 222.
I belive Alinco, along with Ten Tec and MFJ are made in the US..(Ranger too?), they might be more responsive to your comments.

Keep the comments up and again thanks for your interest in 222! NN2G ex KF2OK
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by PHINEAS on August 17, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
I think this issue has 2 issues noone has mentioned.

1. Experimental radio? Doesnt any one modify or build radios anymore? This is not something that is promoted anymore. That means we are left at the mercy of the radio manufacturers to make our gear. I think these unused bands would make great homebrew bands. I would also like to see more kits available.

2. No one will hang out where there is noone talking. lets fact it, people can talk up to 50 miles on 5 watts on 6 meters simplex, but would rather talk about their big toe on the local 2 meter repeater. Go figure.

3. There is a big lack of promoting long distance communications in VHF.(See 2)

4. HF is made to be some status symbol. Instead of a most techs concentrating on being better radio operators, most spend all of their time trying to upgrade.

5. There is not a big profit margin building and selling Amateur gear in the first place.

These 5 things and others are what seem to be the problem with the 222 band.

Phineas
KC0LSC
 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by W6EMR on August 17, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
I wrote this last year and never uploaded it to my webpage, but here it is. I know it is a bit flawed; but bear in mind I am relatively new to this hobby (licensed in '99). I own and operate an ICOM IC-37A 220 mobile as a base station here at my desk. Five watts gets me over 75 miles into a repeater system in the S.F. Bay Area with no problem. Many of the users on the system mistake me for a local, the signal is that good. I know I just have a good path, but this is a good band...........



Why is it so hard to find an all mode rig for this band?

Ever wondered why 1.35 (220) equipment is so expensive?

Or why the major radio manufacturers rarely if ever introduce a new model for this band?

Why do you think the band is seemingly so unpopular with U.S. Hams?

I am going to do this in reverse, so let me try to answer the last question first. My knowledge is limited, so bear with me. (please correct me if I am wrong)

In Canada the entire band (220-225 mhz) is allocated to Amateurs as primary users and where it does enjoy some popularity. Here in the U.S., Hams lost the lower two mhz (220-221.999 mhz) to a commercial interest for Land Mobile and Fixed Station Data Links. We still enjoy privileges from 222-225 mhz, so all is not lost. Many Hams I have spoken with have advised me "not to waste my time, it's a dead band". Obviously they bailed out when they thought the entire band was given away. I, on the other hand, have not given up.

The second and third to last questions.

The 1.35 meter band is peculiar to ITU Region 2 (as is the AM broadcast band of about 520 khz-1710 khz; I believe in N. America only). In Japan and many Asian countries, these frequencies are allocated to public safety, such as police and fire services. This is true in Europe as well, as France uses 220 mhz band for public safety. So you can see where the market to Amateurs is very small and many of the manufacturers that produce Ham gear also build and sell commercial radios to these countries. Hams in other countries are denied the use of this band and there are less than 1 million licensed Hams in North America alone. Not much of a market, especially when new Hams are directed to 2 meters and 70 cm first. Some say good, that keeps the band quiet. Wrong!! There are commercial interests gunning for our spectrum all the time. If we don't make good use of this band, we will lose it! We've already lost 2 mhz...With a new 222 mhz FM mobile rig (and a mediocre one at that) costing almost $300, while a mono-band 2 meter mobile is around $150, it is no wonder. A dual band 2m/70cm unit can be had for less than $300. So no one wants to buy a radio for a band they are told is "dead" and "no one uses that anymore, all the action is on 2m and 70cm if you want to work repeaters". Repeaters?.....

First question.

I saved this one for last on purpose. We know why radio manufacturers are hesitant to intruduce anything new for 1.35 meters, the market is too small. Maybe we can build interest in this band and popularize it....now you know I'm dreaming. Humans are creatures of habit and the tide is turned away...or has it? There are still those Hams that love a challenge and meteor scatter has got to be one of them....Watching the calendar closely and double checking his "skeds", waiting for that perfect time with the beam pointed, ready for that rare contact on 1.35...and wishing for an all mode rig.
Obviously, success would be easier with the narrower band widths offered by other modes. I am too new to this band to know if there ever will be a new all mode rig for 222, but for those Hams that want one, I hope someday that there is.
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by WA2JJH on August 18, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
HEY I HATE IT AS MUCH AS THE NEXT HAM, WHEN WE LOSE SPECTRUM TO COMMERCIAL INTEREST. PART OF, 2.4 GIG HAS BEEN JUST ABOUT SIGNED OFF FOR MEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION USE,AS WELL AS THOSE PANASONIC DIVERSITY RECIEVER CORDLESS PHONES. HAMS ARE NOW SECONDARY USER'S OF MANY
MAH ONLY MICROWAVE SPECTRUM.

I AM GETTING MY MASTERS IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING.
THE MEDICAL INDUSTRY SCREAMING TO THE FCC FOR WIRELESS MEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION. GUESS WHAT CHUNKS OF HAM SPECTRUM ARE ON THE FCC CHOPPING BLOCK, AS WE SPEAK.

YES ITS UNFAIR WHAT HAPPENED TO 220. I GUESS THE MORAL OF THE STORY IS, USE IT OR LOSS IT! UNITED PARCEL SERVICE PITCHED TO THE FCC THAT THE COULD GET MORE CHANNELS IN LESS BANDWIDTH.

IT IS INTERESTING THAT U.P.S GOT 220. THEY ARE USING A NEW TYPE OF SSB MODULATION. TAKES UP ONLY 1.5KHZ. THERE IS A PILOT TONE IN THE SIGNAL, SO NO FINE TUNING IS NEEDED. A TYPE OF COMPRESSION SCHEME IS USED. THE LOWER AND HIGHER FREQUENCIES OF THE HUMAN VOICE RANGE ARE NOT TRANSMITTED. TO COMPENSATE FOR WHAT WOULD BE USELESS AUDIO, THE UPPER AND LOWER VOICE RANGE ARE DIGITLY RECREATED BY EXTRAPOLATING THE MID FREQS THAT WERE TRANSMITTED. MAYBE THIS TYPE OF MODULATION WILL BE IN HAM TRANSCEIVERS SOME DAY.

HEY LETS FACE IT THE A.R.R.L. IS NOT THE NRA!
ARE A.R.R.L. LOBBYIST EVEN ALLOWED IN THE LOBBY!!!!
SOME OF OUR SENATORS ARE HAMS....HOW DID THEY VOTE ON HAM RADIO BILLS?

WE LOST 900MHZ, DUE TO WIRELESS MICROPHONE MAKERS, CORDLESS PHONE MAKERS,WIRELESS SPEAKERS, AND HOME CONTROL AND SURVAILLANCE. 2.4 GIG HAMS HAVE TO ACCEPT INTERFERENCE FROM ALL THOSE NEW WIRELESS DEVICES. HAMS ARE NOW CONSIDERED THE SECONDARY USERS! I GUESS 10 GIG WILL BE NEXT!

WE ARE LICENSED UP TO 300GHZ. IF SOMEONE WITH A BETTER WASHINGTON LOBBY COMES ALONG...GUESS WHAT, THE FCC WILL TAKE THAT SPECTRUM TOO!

THERE IS AN OLD JOKE USED IN HOLLYWOOD. IT IS CALLED THE "GOLDEN RULE"...YOU GOT THE GOLD....YOU RULE!!

73 MIKE WA2JJH
 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by WN3VAW on August 20, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Mike WA2JJH:

(1) UPS never used the 220-222 MHz band. By the time it was allocated, they took their scheme elsewhere. Certainly makes you wonder what was really going on behind the scenes, as there were allegations of what some of the FCC commissioners at the time were really up too, but that's a moot point since they took the band under false pretenses and aren't giving it back.

(2) We haven't lost 902-928 MHz. It too, though, is a lightly used band that has been overrun with Part 15 devices. However, I know of one area college club (Carnegie Tech Radio Club W3VC at CMU) that until very recently ran a Wireless LAN for their members in the 33 cm band using the older Part 15 WLAN technology. So why can't the rest of us do something like that? (I would if I knew more about how to do it... and I want to know more about how to do it!)

(3) Ditto 13 cm. Don't want to lose the band the 802.11b Wireless LAN's cropping up? Figure out how to soup up the power output (thus converting them from Part 15 to Part 97) and run your own. And the same thing will soon apply at 6 cm with 802.11a.

(4) Good point. How do our legislators (both licensed and unlicensed) vote on radio related issues? Maybe if we knew more about it, we could contact them and congratulate or complain as neccesary. Don't forget, a written letter or email is counted & considered to be the equivalent of 1000 or more citizen's opinions, so writing your legislator can make an impact -- if you know who to write, how to write, what to write about, and when.

73
 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by WA2JJH on August 20, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Great source for building any type of TX and RX.

Get the catalog from minicircuits in brooklyn nyc.
One of the MMIC's (microwave monolithic ic's)

Put in 10 milliwatts any freq. from D.C. to 4 ghz. get just under 100mw output. From there it is cheaper to build your larger out devices. Minicircuits makes VCO's
from 1mhz to 30 ghz. They also make modulators any mode digital or analog. They also make great low noise mixers for TX and RX. They also make band pass filters.

Just from their catalog...you can design any TX or RX for under $40.00. All their devices use alomost no external componants. ALL DEVICES ARE 50 OR 75 OHM.

WHAT IS GREAT ABOUT THIER CATALOG IS PRACTICE CIRCUITS. THEY HAVE CHARTS SO YOU CAN GET THE RIGHT BIAS RESISTORS, BLOCKING CAPS AND RF CHOKES. THEY WILL TELL YOU HOW TO CASCADE AND USE THIER DEVICES.

YOU CAN PURCHASE A VCO THAT WILL COVER MULTIOCTIVES
A 2-30MHZ, A 30-200 MHZ. 900MHZ-1.2GHZ. 2-4 GHZ, ECT.
THE VCO'S COST LESS THAN $15.00. THE D.C.-4GHZ 100MW AMP COST ONLY $1.99!!!!!~!!

I WOULD ALSO GET A FREE SUBSCIPTION TO MICROWAVES AND RF. DO A GOOGLE SEARCH ON INTERNET. JUST SAY YOU HAVE A DESIGN COMPANY...FILL OUT THE EMAIL QUESTIONAIR
BINGO... HAMS CAN BUILD ALL SORTS OF DEVICES.

ALL DESIGNES USE AN ULTRA MINIMUM OF PARTS. EVRYTHING IS RF CHIPS .

I AM DESIGNING A DIRECT CONVERSION CW TRANSCIEVER
WITH LUCK 1 WATT OUT 10-40M NO XTAL...USE A VCO AS A VFO, AND THATS IT. YOU CAN BUILD A 2.4 GIG TX/RX THE SAME WAY. AS YOU SEE I LOVE BROADBAND DESIGNS. GUESS WHAT THE D.C.-4GHZ CHIP I AM USING AS A FINAL DRIVER, AUDIO OUTPUT FOR RX, AS WELL AS ACTIVE FILTER FOR DIRECT CONVERSION. I MIGHT MAKE A SIMPLE DOUBLE SIDEBAND MODULATOR TOO, FOR AM AND DSB (DSB IS LSB AND USB. I WILL NOT WASTE MONEY ON A SIDEBAND FILTER.

POINT BEING MADE....HAMS MAY HAVE TO BUILD DEVICES TO KEEP OUR PRESENCE KNOWN ON THE UHF/SHF BANDS.

AS FOR EMAILING OUR ELECTED OFFICIALS...YOU MAKE THE POINT OF ALL. IF A TREE FALLS IN A FOREST AND THERE IS NOBODY OR WLANS AROUND.....DID THE TREE FALL DOWN AT ALL. IS BARRY GOLDWATER STILL IN OFFICE. HE WOULD BE THE RIGHT GUY IN WASH D.C. TO EMAIL.

ALL I KNOW WHEN I TUNE INTO 900MHZ, ALL I GET ARE THOSE DEVICES AND IMOD FROM THEM MIXING TOGETHER.

YOU CAN BET THE FARM, THAT MANY OF THESE DEVICES ARE
BOOSTED. JUST CHECK OUT WHAT YOU CAN PURCHASE FROM THE SOURCES I TOLD YOU ABOUT. 20 WATTS OUT FOR $19.95!

I AM GLAD YOU TOLD ME THAT UPS DID THE OLD BAIT AND SWITCH WITH 220.

WELL....I DO NOT WANT TO SOUND LIKE CHICKEN LITTLE.
BUT HEY...THE SPECTRUM IS FALLING DOWN. HI HI

73 MIKE WA2JJH HOPE TO CATCH YOU ON THE AIR SOME DAY.


 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by W6EMR on August 20, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Also, note that Canadian Hams have primary status on this band............................
http://www.rac.ca/220plan.htm

I guess if we lose the use of 1.35 here, we can always sell our rigs to our Canadian friends :-) LOL

I sincerely hope that does not happen.
 
RE: 222 Mhz the missing band  
by WN3VAW on August 20, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Ah, sorry Mike, Barry Goldwater is no longer in office, at least in Washington DC. He QSY'd to a higher frequency many, many years ago.
 
222 Mhz--> but WHY is it missing??  
by RADIOWEENIE on September 23, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
-->1. The 222MHz band is a very nice band for talking. It's propagational characteristics are vitually the same as for 2m and it is underutilized. This makes it good for communication but also makes it a ripe target for takeover by the commercial "money boys". Indeed this has already happened to 220-222 MHz. Now it is becoming ominously apparent that it can happen again.
-->2. I have done my own part to "support" this band by buying 3 radios which i STILL own: (a) an ICOM 37a. (b) an ICOM 38a, and (c) a KDK. I have NEVER had so much as a single QSO on ANY of them!! Moreover i once borrowed an ICOM 3AT from a friend of mine to mke a trip to NC. During that entire trip i was unable to make so much as a single QSO. And the only time i ever heard any one else's QSO was a short exchange in Greensboro, NC late at night. And I was unable to join that QSO. So where does that leave me? I am an ardent user of 440 MHz and believe that it is by FAR the best band for local communication. And I use 2m on trips due to the proliferation of repeaters and hams who use them. But what about 220? Zilch. Zip. Zero. Rien. Nada.
Nothing.
-->3. Moreover, the US and Canada are the only countries that use 220 to a degree that is even noticeable (with the proviso that one be VERY patient). So the other countries in Regions I and II do not use it at all. So let`s look at this from a financial perspective, a marketing perspective, and a manufacturing perspective. Why spend money for engineering the incluson of a band that is not used, not attractive, and for which the world market is so abysmally low as to be virtually non-existent? I do not use any of my 3 220 rigs because i would only be talking to myself.
-->4. So in conclusion, i will mention to you that all of my 220 radios are for sale. Any takers, boys??
-73 de Radioweenie-
 
RE: 222 Mhz--> but WHY is it missing??  
by WB0NRE on October 28, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Radioweenie,

Post with an email address and you might get a taker on those 220 radios for sale.
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by KD7EFQ on November 29, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Although DCL/Commlink is holding behind the scenes
talks with the FCC to have 222-225 reallocated to
public safety use, I am still purchasing 2 Kenwood
THF6A HT's. Since we lose our spectrum in NON-democratic, Capatalistic decisions, I would be
willing to consider Civil Disobediance, and continue
to use 1.25 cm even if we lose our allocations. Of
course I would only use it if and when 2 Meters or
70 Cm were both unuseable at the same time, but
I doubt that 5w would do much damage as long as I
was on an unused frequency. I don't feel that MIGHT
and MONEY makes RIGHT! Civil Disobediance is an
option, and without it, The United States would have
never been founded, and we would all be singing "God
Save The Queen" as our National Anthem.
 
222 Mhz the missing band  
by VR6EF on March 31, 2003 Mail this to a friend!
I wonder why every time Yaesu or Kenwood or Icom for that matter do not slope their goods towards the dumbo market you all get the sulks!!!!

This world has millions of other amateurs as well as you whinging lot so instead of whinging as you all seem to do regardless of subject ...try thinking of other countries (Highly unlikely unless there is money it for you or of course oil!!!)that don`t have the stupid 220 meg band!!!!!and , I might add don`t even want it.
 
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