eHam.net - Amateur Radio (Ham Radio) Community

Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net



[Articles Home]  [Add Article]  

The Truth About Echolink

Ernest Becerra (N5DBX) on August 16, 2017
View comments about this article!

The Truth About Echolink

Over the years, there have been many debates regarding the legalities of Echolink. I intend to provide a fresh look, one which has never been considered, and to possibly show that Echolink may not be legal after all. However, this is not a debate of it's "usefulness".

Lets start with the classic discussion regarding whether or not the "Echolink System" is actually legal.

The short answer is YES. The reason for this is that Part 97 does not govern the Internet or cell phones. So if we interconnect radio equipment with other technologies, such as the Internet, Part 97 can only govern the Amateur Radio aspect. This means that Part 97 is essentially "blind-folded" to any aspect outside the scope of Amateur Radio, and as long as the Echolink RF transmitter system is compliant (which is within the scope of Part 97), Then yes, the equipment that comprises the echolink apparatus, is indeed legal.

Now keep in mind, so far we have only discussed the "system" itself being legal, basically due to a "technicality". This gray area, which does allow Echolink, at least in part, is largely due to the fact that Part 97 was written long before the Internet was ever created (which is another topic all it's own). OK, now we have decided the system is legal, and this is where the discussion has always ended.

Before we get to the next part, we need to discuss basic Amateur guidelines that we are all familiar with. It goes something like this:

Part 97. Station Operation Standards 97.101 General standards.
(a) In all respects not specifically covered by FCC Rules each amateur station must be operated in accordance with good engineering and good amateur practice.

I hope that we can all agree that, "good amateur practice", probably includes all the basic fundamental aspects of radio, including:

- Station ID every 10 minutes.
- No Profanity.
- No spurious or out-of-band operations.
- General station control, such as frequency, bandwidth, deviation, and transmit power.

-

Now to the final question about Echolink, which has never been asked:

How is it possible for a licensed Amateur Radio Operator, to log into echolink via their phone/Internet, and still exercise "good amateur practice", when they have no real tangible access to any actual radio gear, so that they may directly control frequency, bandwidth, deviation, and transmit power?

Remember, every licensed operator, even separate operators, which operate in a "daisy-chained" fashion, are still required to independently employ "good amateur practice". The fact that the "echolink transmitter" is compliant and legal, does not apply to any other independently licensed station. Also, the fact that most cheap modern equipment does not offer a lot of "bells and whistles" for operator control is irrelevant. We are allowed the freedom to choose our radio gear, or even build it from scratch. Either way the equipment and operator must be jointly compliant. In the case of a licensed amateur logged into echolink while using their phone, although Part 97 does not govern the cell phone itself, the "actions" of the licensed amateur still are.

Consider this: Can you safely operate a car while blindfolded? -- Even if you have a drivers license? Of course not!

So although the Echolink "System" is legal, the Echolink "users" are essentially blind-folded, and therefore non-compliant with Part 97 "good amateur practice", since they could not possibly exercise any fundamental control beyond station ID, and clearly the fundamental structure of good amateur practice which applies independently to every station in the chain, goes well beyond a simple station ID. Right?

73 DE N5DBX

Member Comments:
Add A Comment
 
The Truth About Echolink Reply
by KG4YXN on June 14, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
Applying your logic/assertions regarding "good amateur practice" and being "blind-folded" ... IMHO, using EchoLink is no different (from a block diagram or process perspective) than using a 2m public repeater. You have no control over the operation of the repeater. So applying your logic, would it be bad amateur practice for me to communicate via a repeater of which I have no control?
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by K9PLG on August 16, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
Agree that when connected to a repeater via echolink (or dstar) that you have no control over the repeater itself, isn't that the responsibility of who owns / operates the repeater ?? And the fact that only current licensed operators can get an echo link login restricts the access to these echolinked repeaters... Both echolink and D-star to me are equivalent to an internet based skype call with a radio on one end of the chain or both ends... it's not an all RF path between the two parties hence no awards can be earned using these internet linked modes... kind of cheating IMHO - but if you just want to chat with someone half-way around the globe, it's a good way to accomplish that.. just don't call it 'radio' due to the internet link required.. it's more of a hybrid mode combining internet and RF for part of the signal path.
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by W5GNB on August 16, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
As an Echolink USER, you are simply a Guest on a repeater system that supposedly has a CONTROL OPERATOR. You as a User would not be concerned with the physics of the repeater system, the Control Operator is in charge of the legalities. If YOU as a Guest gets out of control for some reason, the Control Operator has the right to terminate your transmission to maintain Good Amateur Practice.
 
The Truth About Echolink Reply
by W0AEW on August 16, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
I remember a similar flap in the early '90s over the forwarding of "illegal" messages with packet radio. The details of the messages escape me at the moment*, but as I recall the argument, the originator of the offending message would be held responsible as well as each station that automatically forwarded the message. That is, each operator in the chain had to inspect each message before forwarding it: no more automatic propagation of the message through the network.

I suppose the analogy with echolink is that the operators responsible for the link between the internet's output and the radio's input would need to be actively monitoring the connection to terminate any naughtiness right away.

Of course nowadays the content of information is no longer officially monitored in the US, so the whole point is probably moot.

*The messages had antiwar content, I think, (1st Iraq invasion maybe) which someone thought was anti-patriotic.
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by K9MHZ on August 16, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
"So although the Echolink "System" is legal, the Echolink "users" are essentially blind-folded, and therefore non-compliant with Part 97 "good amateur practice", since they could not possibly exercise any fundamental control beyond station ID, and clearly the fundamental structure of good amateur practice which applies independently to every station in the chain, goes well beyond a simple station ID. Right?"


You're making the assumption that the vagueness of the "good amateur practice" term necessarily means some very specific control operator obligations, which was developed before internet based comm. You're "right" if a very old and narrow interpretation is applied, but dated for today. Maybe the feds need to revisit that language.
 
The Truth About Echolink Reply
by KB2DHG on August 16, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
Echolink is a fantastic alternative to radio...
AND as far as good operator practices and language, have you listened on the AIR WAVES lately? They are a MESS!

Now I do not use ECHOLINK much but when my station was down or the band conditions are terrible, it is nice to know I can still converse with my Amateur Radio fraternity.

I support the use of ECHOLINK...
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by AA4PB on August 16, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
Current FCC regulations state that in a message forwarding system it is the control operator of the originating station, the one who introduced the message into the system, who is primarily responsible for insuring that the content is legal. Operators of forwarding stations are obligated to stop the relay after they have been notified of the violation.

 
The Truth About Echolink Reply
by KD6VXI on August 16, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
An extra class licensee who doesn't understand the principal behind 'Control Operator'.

Isn't that a Tech pool question?

--Shane
KD6VXI
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by N4KC on August 16, 2017 Mail this to a friend!

I believe some of you missed KG4YXN's point, and it is a valid one. If we decide that not having complete over-view and control of a transmitter through which we are emitting audio to RF is illegal, then every open repeater station is illegal when we use it to repeat our signals.

Whether I am using that repeater with an Echolink connection or a Chinese HT, the only control I have of the repeater transmitter is on and off. And do I really, in either case? What if the relay hangs and the repeater remains in transmit mode when I release the HT push-to-talk button or hit the space bar on Echolink? That is the responsibility of the repeater control op, either to have some kind of fail-safe or to be sitting there with the switch within reach.

I'm also not surprised to see the "Echolink is not really radio" card played. Oh? Many hams have Bluetooth engaged to operate the push-to-talk on their HTs. Yes, Bluetooth is RF, but it is not "ham band" RF. Is that "radio?"

Is an operator in Australia remotely operating a transceiver in the U.S. Virgin Islands via the Internet really radio? I maintain it is. How the op turns that radio on and off, changes bands, reads the meters, raises or lowers power, gets audio or digital code to the transceiver, or turns the carrier on and off for CW is immaterial.

Via Internet, Bluetooth, or a really, really long piece of cable, it is still radio if the eventual work done is emitting and receiving RF signals.

Right?

(Note that I agree using Echolink to chat between users with no radio being keyed somewhere is not "radio," and I doubt anyone maintains it is. It is VOIP, just like Skype.)

73,

Don N4KC
www.n4kc.com
www.donkeith.com
Author of the new amateur radio book
DIAL DANCING, available wherever
books are sold.



 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by K9MHZ on August 16, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
"I'm also not surprised to see the "Echolink is not really radio" card played."

That did jump out when first reading it. Didn't want to stir the pot, so just wanted to let it go and see if the OP decides to post again, which is usually more revealing than the first.
 
The Truth About Echolink Reply
by N7KFD on August 16, 2017 Mail this to a friend!

I never knew anyone was asking these questions. I've never used echolink or DStar but I never thought to question either ones legality.
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by K9MHZ on August 16, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
I hear you. There is an element, though.
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by AF5CC on August 16, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
I thought that there was no RF involved in Echolink. You just logged onto a computer site, and communicated with others on that site.

From Wikipedia:

Radio amateurs using the EchoLink software can operate it in one of two modes:

Single User Mode. If they have an Internet-connected computer, they can use the computer's microphone and speakers to connect to (or through - see below) other EchoLink-enabled computers over the Internet and talk to the amateur at the other end.


Sysop Mode. This entails connecting their own VHF or UHF transceiver to their Internet-connected PC with a simple homemade or manufactured radio-PC digital mode interface. Doing this enables another radio amateur with their own transceiver, who is within radio range of this station, to communicate with (or through) any other EchoLink-equipped station anywhere in the world. This is the unique feature of EchoLink.

So in Single User Mode, there is no RF so part 97 is completely irrelevant.
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by K9MHZ on August 17, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
Huh?
 
The Truth About Echolink Reply
by NA4IT on August 17, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
"So although the Echolink "System" is legal, the Echolink "users" are essentially blind-folded, and therefore non-compliant with Part 97 "good amateur practice", since they could not possibly exercise any fundamental control beyond station ID, and clearly the fundamental structure of good amateur practice which applies independently to every station in the chain, goes well beyond a simple station ID."

If this were indeed true, every repeater, packet and Winlink system in existence would be illegal.
 
The Truth About Echolink Reply
by K4PDM on August 17, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
As others have said, the Echolink user has no more legal responsibility under the rules than a repeater user. How did this article get approved for posting?
 
The Truth About Echolink Reply
by W9YW on August 17, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
Fooey.

Each link along a circuit path is responsible for their portion. Whether packet data or another modulation scheme, all must comply with Part 97. Fine.

Encryption becomes dubious over circuit paths for Echolink, unless as some argue, the encryption keys are publicly available (so that the data would become transparent).

My obligation as an operator is to not use a bad repeater, or to make it do something not good amateur practice. If it happens beyond my control, then the control operator's responsible.

If someone sits on their HT and keys the repeater for a while, it's the operator of the HT that's responsible along with the repeater control operator-- who should have a time-out when there's a key-down problem.

This is not rocket science. Compliance is every licensed operator's obligation. Echolink, and here's the Truth About Echolink, is a compliant data exchange mechanism.
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by N9AOP on August 17, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
This is not a bad subject. Many ops today may as well have gotten their license as a cereal box prize. So if they read this thread they may get some knowledge about repeater and remote operating. If the thread continues they will also get a good example of back stabbing and other entertaining behavior.
Art
 
The Truth About Echolink Reply
by ONAIR on August 17, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
OK, now I get it. Echolink is legal, but repeaters are illegal! Glad you cleared that up!! ;)
 
The Truth About Echolink Reply
by W2CSH on August 17, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
Good article. I have messed with echolink. I'm not a regular user. For a lot of hams who can't use radio gear for various reasons it is a great way to keep in touch so for that reason alone I think it serves a good purpose. If it was truly illegal someone would have either taxed it or arrested those using it. So lets get back to bashing no code hams.
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by K9MHZ on August 17, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
AF5CC.... have a look at the rear cover of the August QST, if you think EchoLink isn't radio. The Kenwood TM-V71A.... looks like a nice rig.
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by N0FQN on August 17, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
The first and only time I used echolink was computer to computer. No radio, I was "trying it out". IMO why waste your time hooking up a radio when you don't really need it for echolink? A ham from Italy contacted me. He stated he was also strictly on a computer being new to the hobby and had no radio yet. We talked and it was a nice conversation exchanging call signs. Then he requested a QSL for the "contact". I told him this was computer to computer not, radio to radio and, I would not QSL. He got very upset with me. I broke off the contact and said enough of this BS. Way too much computer and not enough radio for me. So, how do you tell if a "ham" is really on a rig or just a computer? I couldn't discern either way except he told me he was just on a computer. To me, it's like Skype is disguise, except no video.
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by G3SEA on August 17, 2017 Mail this to a friend!

It's been around for some 15 years despite earlier claims that it would soon disappear.
It and the other newer systems ie DStar,DMR,Fusion and the even older IRLP are invaluable in this declining Sunspot cycle.
Most activity is through RF ie Repeaters and Links.
I have had a lot of fun with it especially nattering back to U.K. Repeaters :)

G3SEA/KH6

 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by KJ4DGE on August 18, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
Some nets that have been around for 30 years are now using Echolink as a "backup system" when conditions on 80 or 40 are horrid. So they can continue discussions topics under bad propagation. Its called radio evolution.......Some resist change some have it thrust upon them, And some just look for ways to dis it. Oh well so is life. The Zen of HAM radio is to find the balance in all modes of RF LOL
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by N8GD on August 18, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
Hams are communicators. What we do, communicate, is the most important issue, how we do it is secondary.
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by K9MHZ on August 18, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
"Some resist change some have it thrust upon them, And some just look for ways to dis it. Oh well so is life. The Zen of HAM radio is to find the balance in all modes of RF LOL"

I can remember hamfests where the old, slovenly, dim curmudgeons whined so loudly about computer gear showing up on the tables, that some events banned them. Then as time passed and things advanced, it was a huge melodramatic revelation announced on local nets in advance of a hamfest/swapmeet about the "link between computers and radio" and they were now allowing computer gear to be sold.
 
The Truth About Echolink Reply
by NQ4T on August 18, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
So I guess when I connect to a local repeater, I'm running blind-folded because I have no clue how that repeater is engineered.

I guess when I connect to the local Wires-X node, I'm violating law because I have zero idea what repeaters are connected to the room I join and how they're engineered.

No, the responsibility for all of that lies in the repeater owners...who are considered the control operators even though these things are operating under automatic control. If there was an emissions problem with the repeater, who would the FCC go after first? The person who is responsible for that particular machine.

The bigger concern over all of this would be accidentally talking through a machine in a country in which we don't have reciprocal agreements with. If I'm in a YSF room...and someone from Japan gets on that YSF room...am I considered to be operating in a different country?

 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by ZR1PJA on August 18, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
Where I am we have ICASA compared to your FCC.

All our periferral equipment is approved by them as well as ham equipment so as far as I can see everything in the daisy chain is legal.

Also Good Ham Practices should be the dame on any mode where hams are involved.
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by NO6L on August 18, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
The auther should have seen this exact scenario and gone onto another topic before finishing the first sentence in his second argument. This should not have been posted. To elaborate, the fact is, we have to TRUST that the repeater trustee has done his/her homework. Whether the input is an amateur radio frequency, a telephone line or VOIP, that does not change.
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by NO6L on August 18, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
Uh... yeah. This topic is very elementery to amateur radio. The legality of Echo Link, et al, is a prime example of the foreword thinking, in most ways, of those who drafted our rules.
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by K8QV on August 18, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
"Hams are communicators. What we do, communicate, is the most important issue, how we do it is secondary."

- HOW we do it is crucial. Authors, politicians, movie makers and two people sitting on a bus also communicate. Hams make use of the airwaves to communicate, and sometimes it isn't even a real 'communication' but a radio beacon or simple acknowledgement that one's signal can be received at some distance. What defines amateur radio is the use of radio frequencies in free space. Hams communicating with each other via other media is fine but it is not radio.
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by NN2X on August 19, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
I like the Echolink, I use it once in a while. Same with those early HFremote stations, like W4MQ, or W7DXX, and now www.remotehamradio.com.

When I was in the war zone in the Middle East, about 15 years ago, those options, quenched my Ham itch for a while until I got back to the USA!

All good...
 
The Truth About Echolink Reply
by KI7OIO on August 22, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
I dunno ... as with all other law, I believe you have to look at the intent of the law in order to interpret it correctly. The INTENT of FCC law is to enable good RADIO FREQUENCY communication ... you know, band priorities, rules that prevent interference/disruption, that sort of thing. For the part of EchoLink that ends up on the airwaves, the control operator is held responsible for that and is NOT held responsible for content ... same as for any repeater. Internet communication is outside the intent of FCC rules and therefore irrelevant.
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by W6ADF on August 22, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
Don

I agree with you about the VOIP part. Having the app on my cell phone choosing a node and announcing my call sign, isn't too much different than making a VOIP phone call. Hardly seems like Ham Radio, at least to me it does not. Perhaps that is why I rarely use it. I did however make a call back to my hometown repeater when in Thailand. It was strange because the connection was perfect, but the visuals in the pub I was sitting in did not go with the QSO and thus hard to concentrate or take it serious. Haven't used the app since. However Echolink and Dstar radios do have my interest once I get over the price shock! Regarding legality, no issue; the others including you have made your points clear.
 
The Truth About Echolink Reply
by W8LV on August 22, 2017 Mail this to a friend!

Rules? Regs? How about INTENT and the SPRIT of Rules and Regs when it comes to Echolink:

Q "What are three reasons that the amateur service exists?"
A. "To recognize the value of emergency communications, advance the radio art, and improve communication and technical skills"

And this is one of the things that Echolink DOES.

In time of war or emergency, we need the messages to get through: By any means. Today, that's going to be multilayered: By radio, by wire, by microwave link, by satellite, by Internet..one or ALL of these means. Whatever it takes! Say want you want about the messages going through the Internet, but links, backup links, and packets splitting up and going through multiple points of infrastructure makes such delivery more Robust. Let's remember: The Internet is a DARPA War Baby, and thats precisely why it was born.

We have to be proficient in everything from Morse (now being taught again for tactical military as I understand) to TCP/IP.
That's what makes us valuable as a trained pool!

The takeaway? Everything old is new again, and a CW signal is almost jam proof and carries further today just as it did yesterday, because Physics is Physics!

Yet "Modern" mixing of modes and creating multiple routes with the new technology makes getting a signal through more reliable, too!

These arguments here: They are no different than when Broadband went up against CW. Or AM and SSB. They called it "silly side band".
But did you know that General Curtis LeMay (a ham) gave SSB a major push? Because that's what HE decided was going to be the mode for the Strategic Air Command. Because it was more Efficient than AM for that application.

The Modern Battlefield AND Medical/Disaster theatres today demand real time text, voice, and Video. These are Wonderful things. They decrease the Fog of War, where they safe lives, and in a disaster scenario, the only difference is that your Enemy is Mother Nature. So it's applicable to both. But they take bandwidth, and lots of it! The issue here is that Shannon's Law (Physics again!) in regards to bandwidth and throughput also will hold True. So here again we must be proficient in Compression Technology. Isn't it Interesting how this has managed to squeeze more and more data through. We hams can create better compression schemes.


I'm going to take this one more step, and some people won't like it. But I'm still going there: I predict that someday encryption will be an everyday routine thing in Amateur Radio. And not just for Telecommand: But for routine message handling. Police use scrambling. The Hospital HIPPA Laws require privacy. And, EVERY DAY, you use encryption to do your banking, with your secure lock and key sessions on the Internet. Encryption is no longer just a military thing, it's a civilian, everyday thing. While the folks at Bletchley Park and Dayton NCR could never envision such a thing, this next generation of hams has never known a desk that didn't have a computer perched upon it, and they are going to be perfectly comfortable with this concept, even if we today are entirely not.

It MIGHT even be a Good Idea to study Encryption a bit, and have that skill, because our OPEN communications MIGHT someday HAVE to be encrypted on both ends..You never know.

Add final to this, in ANY SHTF Scenario, you might be using your Ham Skills to do ANYTHING Electronic or Electrical. How valuable that may be you can't put a price on.

I hope that gave you something to think about.

Because the INTENT and SPRIT of Laws and Regs is just as important as the words themselves.

Radio will continue to reinvent itself and the Radio Art will continue on, just as it has for over a Century now. So we MUST maintain proficiency in it.

I can't think of one Fundmental Invention that has done as much to change the shape of our World as Radio. And Echolink is just yet another Baby fresh out of the Radio Delivery Room. My opinion is that we should embrace it.

73 and All the Best!
DE W8LV Bill.

 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by KX8N on August 24, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
If you like it, use it.
If you don't like it, then don't use it.
Yes, it's as legal as a repeater.
 
The Truth About Echolink Reply
by KU5Q on September 3, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
TROLL TOPIC.

PILE THE BULL$HIT A$ HIGH AND DEEP A$ YOU CAN!!!!!
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by KU5Q on September 3, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
next
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by KU5Q on September 3, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
Rules? Regs? How about INTENT and the SPRIT of Rules and Regs when it comes to Echolink:

Q "What are three reasons that the amateur service exists?"
A. "To recognize the value of emergency communications, advance the radio art, and improve communication and technical skills"

And this is one of the things that Echolink DOES.

In time of war or emergency, we need the messages to get through: By any means. Today, that's going to be multilayered: By radio, by wire, by microwave link, by satellite, by Internet..one or ALL of these means. Whatever it takes! Say want you want about the messages going through the Internet, but links, backup links, and packets splitting up and going through multiple points of infrastructure makes such delivery more Robust. Let's remember: The Internet is a DARPA War Baby, and thats precisely why it was born.

We have to be proficient in everything from Morse (now being taught again for tactical military as I understand) to TCP/IP.
That's what makes us valuable as a trained pool!

The takeaway? Everything old is new again, and a CW signal is almost jam proof and carries further today just as it did yesterday, because Physics is Physics!

Yet "Modern" mixing of modes and creating multiple routes with the new technology makes getting a signal through more reliable, too!

These arguments here: They are no different than when Broadband went up against CW. Or AM and SSB. They called it "silly side band".
But did you know that General Curtis LeMay (a ham) gave SSB a major push? Because that's what HE decided was going to be the mode for the Strategic Air Command. Because it was more Efficient than AM for that application.

The Modern Battlefield AND Medical/Disaster theatres today demand real time text, voice, and Video. These are Wonderful things. They decrease the Fog of War, where they safe lives, and in a disaster scenario, the only difference is that your Enemy is Mother Nature. So it's applicable to both. But they take bandwidth, and lots of it! The issue here is that Shannon's Law (Physics again!) in regards to bandwidth and throughput also will hold True. So here again we must be proficient in Compression Technology. Isn't it Interesting how this has managed to squeeze more and more data through. We hams can create better compression schemes.


I'm going to take this one more step, and some people won't like it. But I'm still going there: I predict that someday encryption will be an everyday routine thing in Amateur Radio. And not just for Telecommand: But for routine message handling. Police use scrambling. The Hospital HIPPA Laws require privacy. And, EVERY DAY, you use encryption to do your banking, with your secure lock and key sessions on the Internet. Encryption is no longer just a military thing, it's a civilian, everyday thing. While the folks at Bletchley Park and Dayton NCR could never envision such a thing, this next generation of hams has never known a desk that didn't have a computer perched upon it, and they are going to be perfectly comfortable with this concept, even if we today are entirely not.

It MIGHT even be a Good Idea to study Encryption a bit, and have that skill, because our OPEN communications MIGHT someday HAVE to be encrypted on both ends..You never know.

Add final to this, in ANY SHTF Scenario, you might be using your Ham Skills to do ANYTHING Electronic or Electrical. How valuable that may be you can't put a price on.

"I hope that gave you something to think about.

Because the INTENT and SPRIT of Laws and Regs is just as important as the words themselves.

Radio will continue to reinvent itself and the Radio Art will continue on, just as it has for over a Century now. So we MUST maintain proficiency in it.

I can't think of one Fundmental Invention that has done as much to change the shape of our World as Radio. And Echolink is just yet another Baby fresh out of the Radio Delivery Room. My opinion is that we should embrace it.

73 and All the Best!
DE W8LV Bill."

ALL THE WORST....NOBODY EFFICIENT IS GOING TO READ THROUGH ALL THAT CRAP!!!!!!!!!
 
RE: The Truth About Echolink Reply
by W8LV on September 4, 2017 Mail this to a friend!
KU5Q Terry...

Sorry about that, OM.
Way past your Attention Span. So rephrased Here, just for you:

Radio Good.

Echolink Good.

Rude Troll Bad.

Nap time.

Bye Bye!




 
Email Subscription
You are not subscribed to discussions on this article.

Subscribe!
My Subscriptions
Subscriptions Help

Other Editorial Articles
Affectionately Remembering Rod Newkirk, W9BRD