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[Articles Home]  [Add Article]  

Bear Interrupts DX Operation

Paul Signorelli (W0RW) on October 1, 2004
View comments about this article!

Bear Interrupts DX Operation

By Paul Signorelli, WORW, 11 July 2004.

Last night there was a 20-Meter contest on with lots of strong European stations coming in so I took my Elecraft KX-1 out in the backyard to try for a few.

I was outside walking around just after midnight when I worked Alex, YL2KO, Latvia, on 14,060. This was my first European contact on 20 whilst being peripatetic (Pedestrian) mobile. I was hand holding my KX1 and had my eight-foot whip and a drag wire trailing behind me on the grass.

While calling another station, I saw a big black hulk in my driveway. I also heard a raspy sound of claws scratching the cement; I almost dropped the KX-1 as I dashed for the door. I was trying to figure out how to get inside the door with the 8-foot whip tied to my body, as it slammed shut, locking me outside. The big black bear was only 10 feet away. I had to awaken my XYL to let me back into the house. She went to the wrong door not knowing what was happening outside.

The bear was scared away by the clanking noise of my new antenna's capacity hat, a pie pan, and ran the other way back up the driveway . . . whoosh!!!

The adrenaline rush of working Latvia while Pedestrian Mobile QRP is nothing compared to having a bear walk up on you while you are working DX in the dark.

I think I will leave the midnight (zombie) operation for winter time when the bears are HibernatingÖ

Just life in the city -- Colorado Springs, Colorado.

PS: The Bear was back in the yard on 9/31/04. I got the QSL card from YL2KO but He never heard the rest of story. The local TV crew was out interviewing another lady who had seen the bear and right during the interview the Bear came back into her yard. The TV crew got great pictures of the Bear. The week after the Bear showed up in my back yard the local Paper, The Gazette, July 21, Metro section, Pages 1 and 8 had a picture of this bear eating a fawn! The article said you could fight the Bears off with BinocularsÖ great!

Member Comments:
This article has expired. No more comments may be added.
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by W3PH on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Great story :-) I live in a rural area in the Allegheny mtns that has a lot of brown bears, but none has tried to come and help operate yet. It's common to look out the window and see some deer looking in, but so far the bears have been too shy - hope they stay that way!
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KC8VWM on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Were you running "bear" foot at the time?

 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KF4VGX on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Now, that just Bears all !
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by PH1PH on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Yet another argument for running bearfoot...

145, Pete PH1PH - G7ECN
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by NE1RD on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Pretty scary! Well, if it had been me, we'd finally
have the answer to the question: "Does a ham **** in the woods?"

-- Scott (NE1RD)
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by W0FM on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Hi Paul,

I think you are making too big a deal out of this encounter. Personally, I would have tied 130' of #28 insulated wire to a raw chicken leg and lay it in the driveway. Then, just as the bear put the chicken leg in his mouth, I'd have my dog chase the bear up the nearest tree. Upon settling in the top of the tree, the bear would then, no doubt, drop the chicken leg from his mouth (to catch his breath), thus completing the installation of your new stealth long wire antenna.

It appears to me that you missed an opportunity here.

73,

Terry, WōFM
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by GHOSTRIDERHF on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
"The Bear was back in the yard on 9/31/04"

Pretty funny story even if there is no such date

LOL
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KC8VWM on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!

"holding my KX1 and had my eight-foot whip and a drag wire trailing behind me"

Was this drag wire #14 "bear" copper wire?
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by WILLY on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
" ...
I almost dropped the KX-1 as I dashed for the door. I was trying to figure out how to get inside the door with the 8-foot whip tied to my body, as it slammed shut, locking me outside. The big black bear was only 10 feet away.

[...]

PS: The Bear was back in the yard on 9/31/04. "


You need to get the proper firearm and get rid of the problem. I'm surely not going to be afraid of anything in my own backyard.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KC8VWM on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
When bear baiting DX, I usually bear down on the microphone and only run bear foot. This usually helps in putting out a pretty good signal like Jack the bear... However, your antenna will be the most important thing to bear in mind. Always ensure your antenna bearing bears west when working European DX stations.

 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by URBANGORILLA on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Did the big bear have a little bear with him? If so, it was Yogi and Boo-Boo looking for another pic-a-nic basket.

73,
UG
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by WILLY on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
by W3PH on October 1, 2004

"Great story :-) I live in a rural area in the Allegheny mtns that has a lot of brown bears, ... "

Brown bears range over the northwest part of the U.S. and on up into Canada and Alaska.

I think western Maryland has black bears. Maybe that is what you meant.
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by W4SK on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
KX-1? Always a thrill to work DX with a bear bones setup.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AD6WL on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
I could bear to read more stories like this.
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by K0RGR on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
I have a brother in Colorado, where, as he puts it, "the nature freaks come face to face with freaks of nature".

No, he means black bears. And not the cute cuddly kind. We don't officially have them here, but two have been hit by cars on the outskirts of town in recent years, so they're apparently moving in. They are common up north and close by in Wisconsin. Out west, the brown bears are the real big ugly brutes they otherwise call Grizzlies. They kill the black bears if they can catch them.

There's a place in northern MN where some old codger started intentionally feeding the bears years ago, and the locals have continued the practice. In high season, they get hundreds of the huge things every night. I've been there at feeding time, and you can walk around among the bears - just be very careful not to get near any cubs. Nobody has ever been hurt, but I sure wouldn't try that trick anywhere else!
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by NG1I on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
It's bearly possible that he could have been hurt. I waqs camping in the Smokies when another camper saw a bear stick his head in my tent and used a trash can cover to scare him off. I was really bruin after that for awhile.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by W5HTW on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
<<Bear Interrupts DX Operation Reply
by NE1RD on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Pretty scary! Well, if it had been me, we'd finally
have the answer to the question: "Does a ham **** in the woods?"

-- Scott (NE1RD)>>

Dunno bout dat. But the question, "Does a man **** in the yard?" would definitely have been answered.

Ed
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KT0DD on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
I read about the bear that raided a campsite somewhere, and drank a cooler full of Ranier Beer. Could it be possible that the bear in this case was looking for a six-pack of Hams....Oops, I mean Hamms? :) 73.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by K4JSR on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
I think that this post has been BRUIN for a long time!

If you were involved in a DX competition this confrontation would certainly have made you the
"Bear Foot Contesta"!

And as Donald Trump would say, "you're outa here because where there is Smokey, there is 'you're fired'!"

OKAY, Feeeeeeelip, your turn!

73 Cal K4JSR "Y'all come to my Bear Mitzvah"!
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by K4JSR on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
One more thing; Are you sure that the thing following
you wasn't a bear operator from the N5UDE group?

And y'all do know that a nudist is a person in a one
button suit.

Come on, KOE, get me outa here before they hurt me!
Cal K4JSR
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by N7NRA on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Great story. I can imagine your emotions at the time!

As for the bears...

There are two species of bears in the U.S. There are Black Bears all over the continent. They may be any of several colors during the year, brown (cinnamon) or black are the most common. Regardless, they're still Black Bears. They commonly weigh between 200 and 600 punds. Their face seems to be longer and more pointed towards the snout than the Brown Bear species. Black Bears are also tree climbers. They are commonly seen in towns that border their habitat.

In the Western U.S., Western Canada and Alaska there are also Brown Bears. In the lower 48 states, these are commonly called Grizzly Bears. In Alaska they may be called Brown Bears or Kodiak Bears. I believe the Canadians also call them Brown Bears. In these regions, the two species overlap. Brown Bears have a face that seems to be flatter around the eyes than the Black Bear. I've heard it called a "pan face". Brown bears can weigh up to 1500 pounds. Generally, they do not climb trees. Brown Bears are reclusive, almost never seen along roads or in town.

Regards,

Stew
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by K7SVV on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
But, other than that, how was your evening?
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by K3YD on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
It's obvious that having HAM (like bacon) in the garden draws bears from the woods. That's why we need a bundle of feedlines coming into the shack from the antenna farm--to keep the bears away.
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KG6AMW on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
The tension in this article is unbearable.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by K4JSR on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
"Beary interesting..." Arty Johnson, "Laugh In".

"It is the same old deja vu all over again".
Yogi Bear-ah

Maybe that black bear was trying to turn white by going toward some "POLAR COORDINATES"!

Charles, Feeelip, Mikee, Stop me before I pun again!
This is making my Bearicose veins show through my
support hose. But only while wearing my Bearkenstocks.

"A polar bear sleeps in his bear skin in the cold.
He sleeps very well, I am told...
But when I sleep in my little bear skin, I catch a
heck of a cold..." Spike Jones

Sigh, I guess ther is no help in sight!
I guess I'll just have to go BEARSERK!

73, Cal K4JSR
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by W4SK on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Talk about bear-o-metric pressure!
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AD6WL on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
If Friday and time for an ice cold beer.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KC8VWM on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
I second that!

Where's that Labatt's Blue bear at?
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by N6AJR on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
I can bearley stop laughing.. I actually had a bear pop out of the wood and chase my car ( they can move fast!!!) in the hills around el dardo Ca. bearry scarry
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by K4JSR on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Charles said, "I second that!
Where's that Labatt's Blue bear at?"

Smurfs got bears?

I'm just glad that it wasn't Bear Whizz Beer!
You know, the secret is in the water! :-@

Make Homer Simpson noises while going after a brewski!

73, Cal K4JSR
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by K3ESE on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
PAUL! You're FAMOUS now!

I'm so proud...
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by W3PH on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> I think western Maryland has black bears. Maybe that is what you meant.

Yep. (Note to self: do not type in morning before at least 2 cups of coffee ...). Quite a few these days, and fortunately they're the non-fawn (or people) eating type.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by K2WH on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
My bear story is as follows:

I live in North West NJ and on the top of "Bearfort Mountain". This area has the highest concentration of black bears in the state. Coming upon a black bear is a common occurance and some of these guys are BIG.

Anyway, I was installing low level lighting in the back yard and a bear came up behind me out of the woods. I had my .45 Smith and Wesson holstered on my belt and slowly pulled it and pulled the slide back to chamber a round because he was sniffing the air and looking straight at me from about 20'. I slowly raised the weapon, pointing at him. My heart rate at this time was probably way over 120.

He made a move towards me and I backed up against the wall of the house. He advanced a little more and I started to yell at him hoping to scare him away. This did nothing. He advanced to about 10' away from me and stood on his rear legs and was about 10' tall and roaring.

I fired the weapon into his chest. He fell immediately and was screaming, roaring and rolling over and over. I fired again into his back area. He ran into the woods and stopped about 30' away. He turned around and charged me again. I fired again into his head killing the bastard instantly.

Whew, nice fantasy...........

K2WH




 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by TECH2004 on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
"PS: The Bear was back in the yard on 9/31/04"

I can bearly bear to bear this anymore. If such a date exisited then that would have been yesterday. Or did I miss something? Perhaps he was consuming too much beer!
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KB5DPE on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Well, at least he stuck to the bear facts!
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by K4JSR on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
K2WH said..."My bear story is as follows:..."

Bill, that bear is now a DEAD DUDE!
(Snicker, snicker!)

73 Cal K4JSR

 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by N8IWK on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Were you by chance using a female bear-al connector to connect the antenna? That would have attracted that bear.


 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KB7LYM on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Was this Bear holding a weapon ? I heard that it says in the United States Constitution that it is ok to arm Bears.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KC8VWM on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
"Was this Bear holding a weapon ?"

Bearly..
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by W4CBL on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
This whole thread is absolutely unbear-able.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by WX4MAP on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
++ Talk about bear-o-metric pressure!

Alaska Bearometer

When Fur is Dry - FAIR
When Fur is Wet - RAIN
When Fur is Blowing - WINDY
When Fur is White - SNOW
When Fur is Brittle - COLD
When Fur is Standing Up - RUN! IT DOESN'T MATTER WHAT THE WEATHER FORECAST IS!

73, WX4MAP - Clear Blue and 22
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by K4JSR on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
WX4MAP, You left off if the bear is a Kodiak it may be
taking your picture! Hope you aren't "in the bear"
when that happens! (Yes, please accept all of the
meanings on that!)

I just wonder if those big white bears up north ever
get "POLARRHOIDS"? (Had to compete with Kodiak!)
I guess now someone will come up with "Fuji Wuji was
a bear".

This thread is becoming a "Kamikaze" thread. It so
rough that it is even taking out the respondents!
As the veterinary proctologist said, "This is getting
em-bear-assing!!!!

Bye Bye. Please don't look at the "From header".
I would rather not be known!
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 1, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> Brown bears range over the northwest part of the
> U.S. and on up into Canada and Alaska.

> I think western Maryland has black bears. Maybe that
> is what you meant.

Same thing. There are two kinds of bears in the lower 48, black/brown bears, and grizzly bears.

Q: How does a tourist tell the difference between a black bear and a grizzly bear?

A: They climb a tree. If the bear climbs up after them, it's a black bear. If it knocks the tree down, it's a grizzly.

 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 2, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> In the Western U.S., Western Canada and Alaska there
> are also Brown Bears. In the lower 48 states, these
> are commonly called Grizzly Bears. In Alaska they
> may be called Brown Bears or Kodiak Bears.

There seems to be a lot of confusion about this, and not just in this thred. There are four distinct bears found in North America: Black, Kodiak, Grizzly, and Polar.

The true "Brown" bear (ursus arctos) does not occur in the lower 48 states, although it may have once occured in the eastern US. It is also extinct in much of its original range.

The "Black" bear (ursus americanus) does, and, as the latin name applies, is unique to the Americas.

While many people like to distinguish "black" bears from "brown" bears, in the lower US they are all ursus americanus, Black bears.

The "Grizzly" bear, closely related to ursus arctos was identified in the Western United States by the Leiwis and Clark expedition, and named, by them, ursus horribilis.

(Part of the confusion is that some researchers identify grizzly as ursus arctos rather than ursus horribilis. L&C should probably have called the bear ursus acrctos horribilis.)

Lewis and Clark heard of the "horrible bear" from tribes before encountering it. They thought that the stories were exagerated and were prepared to encounter european brown bears. The section of the journals describing their first encounter is probably the scariest reading in the journals.

Grizzlys are found in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Alberta and British Columbia. They range in color from the blond of the Teknalika grizzly in Denali National Park, Alaska, to the "tradition" silver tipped black color most commonly associated with the grizzly.

The Kodiak bear is a Brown bear (Ursus Actos Middendorffi) and is related to the grizzly, but is not a grizzly. The Kodiak is unique to Kodiak island, and found nowhere else in the world.

The polar bear (Ursus Maritimus) is the land shark. It is found in Alaska and eastern Canada.

Black bears are mainly nonthreatening, even when with cubs. Grizzly bears are predators. The Yellowstone population is inbred, crazy, and unpredictable. The remaining grizzlys are more typical and behave as one would expect of a predator. The Kodiak bear is also a predatory, but has too much experience with man, and so can be unpredictable. The polar bear is a killing machine. I have had many encounters with grizzlys and black bears. I do not care to encounter a polar bear.
 
Tiger Ridge  
by KA4KOE on October 2, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
"The Yellowstone population is inbred, crazy, and unpredictable."

Sounds like the population of some small Georgia towns, like Tiger Ridge....reminiscent of Aintry as depicted in the seminal film "Deliverance".

"Make you squeal like a pig, boy!!!"

I can't bear any more.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by W9OY on October 2, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
It must have been Yogi lookin for a picanic basket. You could probably file some federal action against the bear with the FCC for interfering with your duly licensed amateur operation.

 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by WA1RNE on October 2, 2004 Mail this to a friend!

Die hard DXers like you should consider the new Bear-trap vertical.

No loading coils or capacitors required. Just connect the "bear-trap" to the end of your trailing ground and presto, lower impedance counterpoise by virtue of low z hardened steel AND instant protection against the biggest claws in the Northwest.

I couldn't "bear" to watch you during your next contest but your new signal should be impressive, just be sure to "bear" down once it kicks in.....
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by WA2JJH on October 2, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Bears are just entering populated toens these days.
We cut dowm many trees. We have made a great enviormental to these big mammals.

As far as they are concerned we are in thier turf,
In reality we are.

You may find yourself a secondary user of your own land!

Should you be camping and one comes oer while you are eating do not show fear. Do not run.
Simply get up and walk away. They will eat everthing you have.

Do not befriend it. If you keep the same location,
They will show up. They will always expect a high protein meal. A bbq chicken will due.

WARNING...THEY CAN TURN ON YOU FOR NO REASON
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KL7HF on October 2, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
I found that in Colorado, bears are called
Brown Bears by their color. In reality, a
Brown Bear is a sub species of the Grizzly more
properly called a Coastal Grizzly and can reach
heights of 11 feet and weigh upward of a ton.

Once vacationing in the warmer Colorado mountains,
I found myself in a restaurant in Montrose and
noticed a small bear mounted in the lounge. Looking
it over, it had the charateristic grizzly hump on
it's shoulder, but only stood about 4 foot tall on
it's hind legs. I asked the bartender where they
found the "Pigmy Gizzly" and was immediately
escorted out of the bar. Turns out, the bartender
had shot it and took exception to my describing it
a pigmy!

As for the reports that we are the intuder and it
is the bears home! Yeah, right - I'm the top of the
food chain - and luckily I'm the evolved species
with an opposible thumb who can use a trigger!
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AD5GX on October 2, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
If you had been injured, you could sue the whip manufacturer as I bet there wasn't a warning label telling you that affixing the whip to your person could result in personal injury resulting from the inablity to escape a bear attack.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KY6R on October 2, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
I once had a dx-pedition interrupted by Beer.
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by VU2WE on October 2, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Here in India I sometimes leave our village and go out to operate my qrp rig with a makeshift antenna. Our problem is not shy bears but agressive Bengal tigers.
You don't want to be within 'sniffing' range of one of them!


Naomoste - Klaus
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE5X on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Great story! We have a bear that likes (or hates) 160 meters. My 10-80 antennas have been up for years but I never could keep my 160m inverted L up until the bears had gone into hibernation. So I don't have many 160 contacts in the log but got some great photos over the years:
http://www.ae5x.com/bears.html

73,
John Harper AE5X
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> WARNING...THEY CAN TURN ON YOU FOR NO REASON

This is probably the most harmful myth about bears.

With the exception of the Yellowstone grizzly population, there is no documented case of an unprovoked attack on a human by a bear in North America.

What is often true is that people with no understanding of predators will unwittingly provoke bears.

By the way, grizzlys, for the most part, are less dangerous then moose.

Of course, statistically, the most dangerous animal to humans in north america is the deer.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> In reality, a Brown Bear is a sub species of the
> Grizzly more properly called a Coastal Grizzly and
> can reach heights of 11 feet and weigh upward of a
> ton.

Sorry, no. The "Brown Bear" (ursus arctos) is the species most closely related to the grizzly, (ursus horibillis) not a subspecies of the grizzly. The Kodiak is a brown bear, limited to Kodiak island.

There has been confusion and debate over the relationship between the brown bear and the grizzly. Prior to genetic analysis, the two species were considered different.

Lewis and Clark were the first to give the grizzly a scientific name, and called it Ursus Horribilis (horrible bear.) Some researchers, based on genetic information, describe the grizzly as a form of Brown bear, Ursus arctos horribilis, while others continue to consider the grizzly a distinct species.

Since John and Frank Craighead remain in the latter class, I'm inclined to do so also.
 
RE: Tiger Ridge  
by AE6IP on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
KA4KOE,

About the Yellowstone population being inbred: Various studies have shown that grizzlys, for the most part, have very wide ranges, and may interbreed across the entire population.

There is only one population of grizzlys that is isolated from the main population, and that is the population in Yellowstone park, which is separated by about 200 miles from the southern end of the main range, which extends into the Bob Marshall wilderness.

The other aspect of the Yellowstone grizzly population is it is the only population of grizzlys that has clearaly documented cases of completely unprovoked bear attacks on humans.

Thus, "inbred and crazy."

Marty
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by K4JSR on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
KOE sez, "Sounds like the population of some small Georgia towns, like Tiger Ridge....reminiscent of Aintry as depicted in the seminal film "Deliverance".

"Make you squeal like a pig, boy!!!"

I can't bear any more."

The truth is that Ned Beatty is darned happy that they did not give him a "BEAR-ium Colonic Irrigation"! He surely would have cried,"URSUS! FOILED AGAIN"!!! But then that would have been
ursinine.

JJH, the bears are a necessary population in the sewers of NYC. They do help control the alligator
population!

At this point I will leave this thread to the capable
hands of the BEAR-geoisie.

73 Cal K4JSR
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KC8VWM on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!

"there is no documented case of an unprovoked attack on a human by a bear in North America."

Sorry, but I know of many. They are rare, but they do in fact happen.

I have lived in Canada for many years and have been to Algonquin Park, Ontario on many occasions. I have encountered black bears on many occasions.

I personally know there have been many "documented" cases of unprovoked bear attacks. One in particular involved a couple that camped on Lake Opeongo (inside Algonquin Park) while I was camping in the park's interior one year.

They suspected that the particular campsite was unknowingly located on a "migratory" bear trail. The woman in the group was - uh, how do I say it.. "that time of the month" and the bear probobly acting similarly to a shark, sensed a smell that "triggered" the attack response.

Documented Studies:

"As a result of five human deaths inflicted by two large adult male black bears in Algonquin Park, Ontario, a long-term study is being conducted to examine ..."

Source : http://www.algonquin-eco-watch.com/blackbear.htm

Here's another place to learn about "Bear Attack Behaviour 101":

"between 1978 and 1991, the years in which the park's two fatal bear attacks occurred, the park..."

http://www.wspa.ca/bearsafe/bearsafe_print.html

73

Charles - KC8VWM
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by N6AF on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Quite frankly, you may have missed a great opportunity to extend the ranks of the Amateur Radio fraternity to the bear population. When he saw you working those DX stations his interest was clearly sparked. Next time I suggest passing the mic to him for a few friendly grunts.

73 N6AF Charles
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
KC8VWM,

Two comments. First, there is no agreement among bear researchers whether menstral blood is a bear attractant. In particular, Craighead, in Yellowstone, over 30 years, was unable to detetermine any unusual bear behavior related to menstration among his students.

Second, putting a tent down on a migratory pathway hardly qualifies as a lack of provocation. Many people who have been attacked believe that they did nothing provocative. Yet upon interview, it is usually very easy to determine what the provocation was.

One problem is that a lot of people go out into the woods with either poor or no knowledge of bear behavior. As a result, they put themselves unnecessarily at risk.

North American bears, including grizzlys, but not polar bears (which are killing machines) are apex predators, and behave as such. If you understand the fight-or-flight reflex of predators, and avoid making some common mistakes, you won't have bear problems.

Whenever someone mentions people having problems with bears in some park or another, I bring up Denali. In Denali, you are *required* to take bear awareness training before hiking in the park. Denali has a large population of grizzlys, and it is common to see them while backpacking, or even hiking, in the park. Denali, also, has never had an incident of a bear attacking a human.

Do people get hurt, even killed, by bears? Yes. Were they doing something that provoked the bear? With the exception of the rogue grizzlys in Yellowstone, yes. Did they know they were provoking the bears? Usually, no.

If you want "dealing with bears, 101", I recommend the Denali 15 minute video on grizzlys. If you want "dealing with bears, graduate studies", I recommend Craighead's book on Yellowstone.

 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
http://www.algonquin-eco-watch.com/blackbear.htm

This study was not concluded. Also, it contains a paragraph on bear behavior in the presence of garbage dumps and camp food that indicates that the author is not familiar with the work of the Craigheads in Yellowstone that led to the US NPS changing its regulations with respect to open dumps and tolerating bear/human interaction.

To summarize Craighead: bears are apex predators. As such, when accustomed to a particular food item, they will attack in order to obtain that food item. Allowing bears access to open dumps is a guarentee that the bears will eventually attack humans to obtain food at camp sites.

(Aside: I visited Yellowstone many times during the period in which the NPS used the open dumps to attract the bears. It was obvious at the time what the danger of habituation was, and it is unconscienable that the NPS took so long to accept Craighead's results.)
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
http://www.wspa.ca/bearsafe/bearsafe_print.html

This is a reasonable document.

A couple of quick comments:

Horses are skitterish of bears and can usually detect them more readily than humans or dogs. If your horses become skitterish unexpectedly, be especially alert for bears.

Pepper spray is not always effective.

Bears in the California Sierra Mountains are very familiar with humans. Storing your food/garbage tied up between trees rarely works with these bears.

 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> I'm the top of the food chain

so's the grizzly

> - and luckily I'm the evolved species with an opposible thumb who can use a trigger!

More than a few of which, heavily armed, have been killed by bears.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KC8VWM on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
"This study was not concluded."

Huh? Human Death by a bear attack is a pretty final conclusion if you ask me????

 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> "This study was not concluded."

> Huh?

Check the URL you posted. They got their funding taken away and never finished the study.

> Human Death by a bear attack is a pretty final
> conclusion if you ask me????

To an individual's life, yes. To the question of whether that bear was provoked or not, no.


 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KC8VWM on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
"In Denali, you are *required* to take bear awareness training before hiking in the park."

Interesting,

There are places in Northern Ontario that require you to take a shotgun with you when hiking in the woods.
It is actually a law on the books.

This is in addition to any bear awareness training the individual might have.


Charles
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KC8VWM on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Provoked?

So you think the couple camping on Lake Opeongo might have "provoked" their own deaths?

I have trouble with this explanation.

Please elaborate...

By the way, thier bodies were found buried in the ground by a short distance from thier campsite.

It was reported by the park rangers (MNR) this is apparently what bears do when they are storing food. This is kind of like when a dog buries a bone and retrieves it later.

This incident took place in the Summer of 1991 when I was in the park. They closed the entire area until officials could find the bear. It was big news there, but you probobly didn't hear about it in the U.S.

 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KC8VWM on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
"Check the URL you posted. They got their funding taken away and never finished the study. "

The funding was a victim of government cutbacks.

This doesn't prove anything... Why?

They conducted the study because they wanted to maintain an ongoing database of bear attack incidents. Later the Canadian government thought that it would "not be in the interests" of the visitors to the park (like Yellowstone Park - except 6 times larger) to continue the study.

They feared that it would deter visitors into the park if the study continued. ...So it was axed under the pretence of "wasted money."









 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> There are places in Northern Ontario that require
> you to take a shotgun with you when hiking in the
> woods.

What a waste of weight.

> It is actually a law on the books.

There are a lot of silly laws.

> This is in addition to any bear awareness training
> the individual might have.

Does the law require carrying ammunition, or just the shotgun?

FWIW, I've hiked in bear country, in the US, and Canada, hundreds of times, often for weeks at a time, without a weapon. Requiring one smacks of hysteria.
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KL7HF on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
I'm sure it is nice to have so much knowledge
of bears - however, we are unfortunate enough
to have to recover the remains of those who believe
they are comfortable enough in bear country to
not carry protection. Yes - Alaska state law does
also require a weapon when backpacking in the woods.

After 65 years of living in bear country, I can assure
you that they can - and do attack without being
provoked. Not common, but when they get out of bed on
the wrong side, they can be very dangerous.
Usually they are protecting food or young - but every
now and again - they will attack because they feel like it!

The Polar Bear is held with disdain by the eskimos.
I have seen them turn their back on a polar bear and
have their picture taken.

As to the Kodiak - it is identical to the brown bear
on the mainland and other islands. They are only
called "Kodiak" because that's where they are located.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> Provoked?

> So you think the couple camping on Lake Opeongo
> might have "provoked" their own deaths?

> I have trouble with this explanation.

> Please elaborate...

Did they camp on a migration path or not? If they did, they put themselves in harm's way. Also, anyone who would camp on the path is unlikely to respond to thhe presence of a bear in any way other than panic. The standard panic reaction is flight. Flight, to a predator, is an invitation to dinner.

> By the way, thier bodies were found buried in the
> ground by a short distance from thier campsite.

> It was reported by the park rangers (MNR) this is
> apparently what bears do when they are storing food.
> This is kind of like when a dog buries a bone and
> retrieves it later.

Bears don't store food, they consume it. Bears will come back to the same carcass for several days in a row, but will not move it. Bears don't dig holes and put food in them.

> This incident took place in the Summer of 1991 when
> I was in the park. They closed the entire area until
> officials could find the bear. It was big news
> there, but you probobly didn't hear about it in the
> U.S.

That was nearly 15 years ago, so I couldn't tell you if I heard about it at the time or not. Probably not, as I wasn't paying much attention to bears in the early 90s.

From the details available, it's not a particularly compelling case for an unprovoked attack, and it has attributes that don't even sound like bear attacks.

There have been, apparently, three attacks on humans in that park in the last 30 years. They all, it seems, have happened within a very small area of the park, heavily travelled. The little evidence available on the web seems to indicate bears that had been habituated to humans, and humans unfortunately unprepared to deal with bears.

To put this in contrast, in Yellowstone, there is an average of 1.4 bear-inflicted wounds on humans per year. Every bear encounter, resulting in injury, in Yellowstone since 1950, has been documented and analysed. Of these, all but a small number can be accounted for as provoked. All of the unprovoked attacks were caused by grizzlys.

In Yellowstone, by the way, according to park statistics, you are more likely to drown than be attacked by a bear.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> Yes - Alaska state law does also require a weapon
> when backpacking in the woods.

Not in national parks. I have backpacked in Denali without a weapon. Having been shot at by idiots thinking they were shooting at deer, I find federal law safer, thanks.

> After 65 years of living in bear country, I can
> assure you that they can - and do attack without
> being provoked.

Do you have any documented examples? I would like to find one, because after 50 years of living in bear country, I've never been able to. (other than inbred grizzlys in yellowstone.)

> Not common, but when they get out of bed on
> the wrong side, they can be very dangerous.

They are always very dangerous, and even someone well aware of that can get dead as a result. What I've yet to discover them being (outside of yellowstone) is unpredictable.

> Usually they are protecting food or young - but
> every now and again - they will attack because they
> feel like it!

Out of curiousity, how do you know that it's because they "feel like it" rather than because they feel provoked?

> The Polar Bear is held with disdain by the eskimos.

I know snake handlers that feel that way about rattlers.

> I have seen them turn their back on a polar bear and
> have their picture taken.

I've seen tourists in Yellowstone get between a cow moose and a calf to get their picture taken. Something looks out for the foolish, sometimes, I guess.

> As to the Kodiak - it is identical to the brown bear
> on the mainland and other islands. They are only
> called "Kodiak" because that's where they are
> located.

I think a wildlife biologist would disagree with that explanation.

But, it is an interesting feature of biology that what we think things should be named and how we think they are or aren't related to each other changes over time, and there is a healthy debate over the relationships among the various bears.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> They conducted the study because they wanted to
> maintain an ongoing database of bear attack
> incidents.

But they never reached any conclusion as to the nature of the attack you described, so they hardly qualify as documenting an unprovoked attack.

> Later the Canadian government thought that it
> would "not be in the interests" of the visitors to
> the park (like Yellowstone Park - except 6 times
> larger) to continue the study.

Yes, well, governments are stupid about wildlife studies. Similar mistakes have been made in Yellowstone for similar reasons.

By the way, Algonquin provincial park is 7725 km-sq; Yellowstone is 8987 km-sq; making Yellowstone slightly larger, not six times smaller.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Paul W0RW:

Sorry for hijacking the thread for bear minutia. I did want to say that in all my years in bear country, yours is by far the best bear story i've heard.

73,

Marty
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> I'm sure it is nice to have so much knowledge
> of bears - however, we are unfortunate enough
> to have to recover the remains of those who believe
> they are comfortable enough in bear country to
> not carry protection.

One of the worst search and rescue efforts I was involved in ended up being a remains recovery effort. The guy was an NPS ranger. He had had 20 years of back country experience in Yellowstone, and was an expert on grizzlys. He was armed. I guess the bear drew first.

By the way, you are *allowed* to carry a gun in Alaska, for protection. You are not *required* to carry one.

From an Alaskan Center web page: "Remember, though, that more people are hurt by the guns they carry than are hurt by bears."

 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 3, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> I'm sure it is nice to have so much knowledge
> of bears - however, we are unfortunate enough
> to have to recover the remains of those who believe
> they are comfortable enough in bear country to
> not carry protection.

One of the worst search and rescue efforts I was involved in ended up being a remains recovery effort. The guy was an NPS ranger. He had had 20 years of back country experience in Yellowstone, and was an expert on grizzlys. He was armed. I guess the bear drew first.

By the way, you are *allowed* to carry a gun in Alaska, for protection. You are not *required* to carry one.

From an Alaskan Center web page: "Remember, though, that more people are hurt by the guns they carry than are hurt by bears."

 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KB9WQJ on October 4, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
I hear that in some places they require you to pin these little bells on your clothing...supposedly the bears can hear you coming and are thus not startled and have time to be aware of your presence and not be startled into attacking before you can get away.

RANGER: "Just pin these little bells on your clothes and gear when you are entering bear country."

HIKER: "How do I know where bear country is?"

RANGER: "Just look for the bear scat on the ground"

HIKER: "You can see lots of different animal droppings on the ground. How do I know which ones are bear droppings?"




































RANGER: "Bear droppings are the ones with the little bells in them."
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KC8VWM on October 4, 2004 Mail this to a friend!

Marti your missing the point. Your original statement said;

"there is no documented case of an unprovoked attack on a human by a bear in North America."

Here are some examples including the verified source for the information:

"Recorded killings by black bears this century total only about 34 across North America. Most of these killings were (unprovoked) acts of predation."

Source: Water & Woods Fact Sheet

http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:14XGu7KaHskJ:waterandwoods.net/huntingtips/hfact5.php+unprovoked+bear+attacks&hl=en

Other examples:

"Jason Sansom, 24, of Malstrom Air Force Base in Great Falls, Montana suffered puncture wounds to both arms after an (unprovoked attack) by a brown-colored black bear on the south shore trail of Two Medicine Lake on Monday afternoon."

Source:
http://www.maineguides.org/referendum/bear_attacks20.shtml


"It appears that this was an (unprovoked attack.) According to the victim's family Bradley was an experienced day hiker..."

Source:
http://www.imagesbuilder.com/gsmnp/bear-attack-in-smokies.html


"a black bear injured two campers in (unprovoked,) apparently predatory, attacks in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness.."

www.bearstudy.org/Research/Publications/ BWCAW%20Bear%20Attacks%20of%201987.pdf


"It still appears to be an (unprovoked attack,)" Gray said."
Source:http://www.tennessean.com/sii/00/05/24/bears24.shtml



The total size of Yellowstone National Park is 2.2 million acres.

Source:
http://www.bigskyfishing.com/National_parks/yellowstone/yellowstone_park.htm


The Algonquin claim covers an area of 8.9 million acres.

Source:
http://www.nativeaffairs.jus.gov.on.ca/english/algonquin/faq.htm


 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by K3CXG on October 4, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Paul W0RW: Great story - definitely bears repeating! Scott NE1RD: When hams meet bears, the hams don't **** in the woods - they **** in their trousers! Cal K4JSR - I knew you couldn't let this one go by without comments. You must have been lurking in the bear-y patch...

"Look for the bear necessities..."

73 (-:
Mike K3CXG
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KL7HF on October 4, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
You are wrong, wrong, wrong.
Alaska law REQUIRES a weapon be carried in
all excursions to the bush.

The law is not enforced, it is on the books
to provide "No Harm" to the state in case of
lawsuits. The law has been on the books for
60 years.

As to no bear attacks in McKinley Park (or
Denali as the politically correct like to say)
is nonsense. Of course there have been. Prior
to the present heavily population of the park, and
the revision of the borders thanks to Jimmy Carter,
there were often searches for hikers who dissappeared
and were never found. Heck, we've had many bear killed
people in the municipality of Anchorage.

Don't believe all the press you read from the outsiders
that run the goverment operations here.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 4, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> "there is no documented case of an unprovoked attack
> on a human by a bear in North America."

> Here are some examples including the verified source > for the information:

> list deleted.

None of those are examples of _documented_ cases of _unprovoked_ attacks. Even some of your quotes use the word 'appears'.

The first one doesn't even mention any cases, it merely makes a claim that attacks are unprovoked.

The second one cites as it's source "posted on the web, news source unknown". That is *not* a _documented_ attack.

The third one describes two attacks. The second clearly qualifies as provoked. It also, unfortunately, demonstrates a point I made earlier: most people panic, and run. This is the worst thing you can do.

The first attack in this case highlights what may be a difference in understanding. Crowder clearly provoked the bear by running. Do not run from a bear that is within 20 feet.

The last one indicates that the woman may have been dead before the bears started feeding on her. That's not even an attack, it's merely scavenging.

> The Algonquin claim covers an area of 8.9 million
> acres.

That's nice. However, you've been talking about the Alqonquin _park_ until this point, and the _park_ is smaller than Yellowstone. And, of course, 2.2 is not 1/6 of 8.9, anyway, it's 1/4.



 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KL7HF on October 4, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
For AE6IP, One last post, as no one will change
anyones mind.

First yes, the Kodiak Brown Bear is the same as
all others in BC and Alaska. Remember, the bear is an
accomplished swimmer. They travel between islands and
the mainland. Fishing boats have reported finding
brownies on the open ocean going God knows where.

Second - as to unprovoked attacks - my last Grizzly
kill was when I was berry picking, behind McKinley.
I had been there for several hours when a small male
took exception to my presence. I waited until I was
sure it wasn't a false charge before firing the .338.
No way did I provoke this bear.

KL7DG lost his wife and nephew to a Brown Bear attack
not very long ago. They were out for a walk. Later,
a moose kill was found nearby - this was obviously
a bear protecting his cache. (In the municipality
of Anchorage)

The scientific community is re-thinking the Polar Bear.
A true carnivore as opposed to the Grizzly being an
omnivore, they do no fit the mold as a bear. They are
larger than even the Brown Bear, males do not den-up and hybernate as do bears. In addition, skull thickness is weak allowing small caliber rifles to kill in a head shot. Shoot a Brownie in the head, the bullet will likely ricochete due to the shape and thickness of the skull.
A Brownie with a headache can be a real handfull!

Polar Bears are not restricted, as you said to eastern
Canada and Alaska. They ride the ice pack from Russia
and western Scandinavia to Greenland, Siberia and then
all of northern Canada and Alaska.

Bear experts are a hard headed bunch. Once on the
Beaufort sea, we found a Barren Ground Grizzly some
5 miles from land on the ice pack. A discussion with
an experience biologist later at the Naval Arctic Research Lab turned into a heated discussion when he
insisted Grizzlies never went out on the ice pack.

Enough! We have beat this subject to death
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 4, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> You are wrong, wrong, wrong.
> Alaska law REQUIRES a weapon be carried in
> all excursions to the bush.

> The law is not enforced, it is on the books
> to provide "No Harm" to the state in case of
> lawsuits. The law has been on the books for
> 60 years.

Then you should have no trouble citing it. Please do.

> As to no bear attacks in McKinley Park (or
> Denali as the politically correct like to say)
> is nonsense. Of course there have been. Prior
> to the present heavily population of the park, and
> the revision of the borders thanks to Jimmy Carter,
> there were often searches for hikers who
> dissappeared and were never found.

Care to document that?

> Heck, we've had many bear killed people in the
> municipality of Anchorage.

Many? sure. Of course. This is why the Anchorage daily has only one story with the phrase "bear kills man" in it's archive of stories from 1985-2004, and that's about a guy who shot the bear twice before it killed him, and didn't happen in Anchorage.

> Don't believe all the press you read from the
> outsiders that run the goverment operations here.

Oh, I don't. I always ask for collaboration of claims.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KC8VWM on October 4, 2004 Mail this to a friend!

Marty,

I am amused at your denial of the facts even when they are presented to you in clear daylight.

Best regards to you and your family. Thanks for the discussion.

73

Charles - KC8VWM
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 4, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> First yes, the Kodiak Brown Bear is the same as
> all others in BC and Alaska.

As you say, no one is going to change anyone's mind. I'll stick with the biologists on this one, thanks.


[story removed]

I hope you don't mind if I don't consider you an unbiased observer in that case?

> KL7DG lost his wife and nephew to a Brown Bear
> attack not very long ago.

Larry Waldron was Marcie Trent's son-in-law. Their deaths were tragic.

> They were out for a walk.

They were hiking along McHugh Creek.

> Later, a moose kill was found nearby - this was
> obviously a bear protecting his cache. (In the
> municipality of Anchorage)

We should probably explain "municipality of Anchorage" to people who've never been there. But let's note that it is speculation that the bear that killed Trent and Waldron was the bear that belonged to the moose carcass.

> Polar Bears are not restricted, as you said to
> eastern Canada and Alaska.

I never said they were. I said that *in North America* they are found in eastern Canada and Alaska

> Bear experts are a hard headed bunch. Once on the
> Beaufort sea, we found a Barren Ground Grizzly some
> 5 miles from land on the ice pack. A discussion with
> an experience biologist later at the Naval Arctic
> Research Lab turned into a heated discussion when he
> insisted Grizzlies never went out on the ice pack.

Grizzlies don't voluntarily go on the pack. And people who do are noted for, um, exageration. I'd want documenetation, myself, but once I got it, I'd believe it.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 4, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> I am amused at your denial of the facts even when
> they are presented to you in clear daylight.

I am amused that you think unsubstantiated reports quoted second hand from anonymous sources on a web site are "facts."

Or by "fact" did you mean your claim that a park smaller than Yellowstone was 6 times larger than Yellowstone?

I'm sorry, Charlie, but you haven't, in your web searches, turned up any examples of documented unprovoked attacks.
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by W0RW on October 4, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Thanks for all the Bear replies.
Yes the bear was back on 9/30..corrected date.
She is a brown - black bear now with a cub, and has been back a few more times since.
If you want to see a picture of me operating perestrian mobile using the KX1 in bear country, send me an email.
w0rw@aol.com
or the pictures are in the October, 2004, issue of the 'K9YA Telegraph'.
To subscribe to the free 'K9YA Telegraph' go to
http://www.qsl.net/k9ya and request the Oct. 2004 issue be sent to you.
i got my 1000 miles per watt certificate from this contact working Latvia.
Paul w0rw
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KC8VWM on October 4, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Most of these killings were (unprovoked) acts of predation.

The Boston Globe reported "142 documented" deaths by bear.

Source: http://www.ofah.org/news.cfm?Section=Media%20Watch&Action=GetDoc&ID=71


Okay, newpapers don't seem like a reliable enough source for you?


Ok, Here how about this source?

STEPHEN HERRERO, Environmental Science, Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary.

"Most recent studies of bear attacks in North America have focused on national parks (Herrero 1985, Gunther 1994, Gniadek and Kendall 1998), and to a lesser extent states or provinces (Middaugh 1987, Miller and Tutterow 1998, Herrero and Higgins 1999).

We documented and analyzed all known serious and fatal bear-inflicted injuries that occurred.."

"The bear showed stress behaviours such as: salivating, vocalizing, clicking upper and lower teeth together, standing upon hind legs, running toward or away from the person(s), hitting the ground with forepaw(s), and rotating ears back. The personís behaviour prior to the encounter may have contributed to the bearís being startled. For example, the person may have been downwind of the bear, or may not have been making loud noise. There may have been high ambient noise such as at a location near a rushing stream. Dense vegetation may have impeded vision. We regard bear attacks preceded by the bearís being startled as defensive some have used the term provoked in this context."

Source:
www.canadianrockies.net/Grizzly/AB_injury030116.pdf



What other sources could you possibly need?

 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 4, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Charlie,

Herrero mentions "provoked" in a parenthetical remark, in which he gives an uncommon definition of provoked. (Notice he says "some have used ...)

If you use "provoked" as a synonym for "bear was startled", then, yes, there have been "unprovoked" attacks.

However, that is not how I intended to uses the word, nor is it how I am familiar with it being used to describe bear attacks.

An attack by a predator is "provoked" in the context of human/predator interaction, if the human acts in a way that threatens the predator, or that mimics the behavior of prey. In the context in which I made the original statement, an 'unprovoked' attack is one in which the bear attacks in a manner inconsistent with typical predator behavior.

The problem with "bear was startled" as a synonym for provoked is that it would classify any action in which a bear was not startled as 'unprovoked.' This would include, for example, a human who continued to approach a bear that had been aware of it for some distance. Any bear in Yellowstone who attacked a tourist who walked out of an observing group, and walked up to the bear, would be "unprovoked" by Herrero's definition, since the bear would not be startled.

For his system, Herrero uses "startled" and "predation". These are good words for his intent, and substituting "provoked" and "unprovoked" does not give the same analysis of attacks.

Where you and I disagree is that you would classify all predatory attacks as unprovoked, but I would not, since Craighead et al established (and Herreror substantiates) that human behavior is an important precursor to predatory attacks.

 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KC8VWM on October 4, 2004 Mail this to a friend!

"Where you and I disagree is that you would classify all predatory attacks as unprovoked, but I would not, since Craighead et al established "

Agreed, but I have included this interpretation for further clarity and discussion.

As humans, I would have to concluded that our normal social behaviour would invoke a predatory response from a bear.

The term "unprovoked" is largely dependant on the interpretation.

Humans "responding" to the presence of the bear approaching their territory or personal "space" is typical human behaviour.

However, some experts don't classify this human behaviour as "unprovoked" because looking at a bear directly in the eyes when it approaches can actually "provoke" the bear to attack.

Then again, as humans, we look at a bear in the eyes and consider this a normal human behaviour by our social standards.

In simple terms.

The act of looking at another human being approaching their terrirtory is socially considered and accepted as unprovoking behaviour in our human world.

However, in the bear world this would be interpreted as a prelude to an attack thus initiating a response from the bear.

Provoked and unprovoked have different perspectives.

What humans don't consider "provoking" may not interpreted by an animal in the same way.

It is for this reason that "unprovoked" attacks are often reported by the media. We are not aware of our actions and then suddenly the bear attacks for no apparent reason...

...Or was there a reason?

I found the bear attack study conducted in Calgary to be very detailed oriented and interesting.

Thank you Marty for a most challenging and academic discussion on the matter. I found it most refreshing to explore.

73

Charles - KC8VWM
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by K4JSR on October 4, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Charles and Marty, I am just a bit curious.
Are the bears going to abide strictly to any accord
that you two may reach?
Hey! Gimme a break! Somebody had to ask! :-P

73 y'all! Cal K4JSR
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KC8VWM on October 4, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
lol.. Cal

Good question.

Perhaps another study on this subject is at hand?
:)

73

Charles - KC8VWM
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by WA2JJH on October 4, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
BUY THAT BEAR A BEER!
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KA4KOE on October 5, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
We need to trim this discussion thread down to the bear necessities.....

Yeah....
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by W4KDH on October 6, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
So I suppose the important question at this point is...

what kind of modifier do you get?
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AK2B on October 6, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Letís review. You were walking around at midnight, fiddling with a black box with an eight foot rod and a pie tin at the end attached to your body, while dangling a wire behind you. And, you scared a bear. Iím surprised you didnít get to meet someone from Homeland Security.
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by W4SK on October 6, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Saw your picture, wearing a hat. Good to see you weren't bearheaded.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 6, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> Charles and Marty, I am just a bit curious.
> Are the bears going to abide strictly to any accord
> that you two may reach?

I would think it's the other way around. Since I spend time in the vicinity of bears, I would *prefer* than any accord we reached described the way bears _really_ behave.

 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by AE6IP on October 6, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
> As humans, I would have to concluded that our normal
> social behaviour would invoke a predatory response
> from a bear.

Yes. It definitely does.

> Then again, as humans, we look at a bear in the eyes
> and consider this a normal human behaviour by our
> social standards.

and thus end up being attacked, and probably leading to the bear being destroyed.

> However, in the bear world this would be interpreted
> as a prelude to an attack thus initiating a response
> from the bear.

Exactly.

> Provoked and unprovoked have different perspectives.

> What humans don't consider "provoking" may not
> interpreted by an animal in the same way.

And the key to humans and bears coexisting with the least problem to both is to teach humans that when they are in bear country, they should play by bear-safe social rules.

> I found the bear attack study conducted in Calgary
> to be very detailed oriented and interesting.

Yes. Herrero et al seem to be the best source for recent research on human-bear interaction.
If you liked the study, I strongly recommend his book, "Bear Attacks: Their Causes and Avoidance"

For an older, but more detailed look at bear behavior, I recommend "Track of the Grizzly", Frank Craighead's popular account of his work in Yellowstone. For the more serious student, "The Grizzly Bears of Yellowstone: Their Ecology in the Yellowstone Ecosystem, 1959-1992"

> Thank you Marty for a most challenging and academic
> discussion on the matter. I found it most refreshing
> to explore.

Thank you Charles, it has indeed been refreshing.

73,

Marty
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by W4SK on October 6, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Well, boys, its the SINGING ones you have to watch out for.

Baritones, each and every one.
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by WA1RNE on October 6, 2004 Mail this to a friend!

Good thing this article wasn't of any huge importance to ham radio. Luckily the guy who wrote it got to ham it up and pass along the details of his "Bearish QSO Party".

I know from time to time we discuss maximum power from amplifiers, etc. but didn't realize that "maximum debate" was so much a part of ham radio.

Wonder how this discussion would sound on the air?
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KL7IPV on October 6, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
While I lived in Anchorage, I KNEW a person who owned a radio shop on Government HIll. In 1972 he was in the woods of Kenia and was "tracked" by a bear that followed him parallel for a long way and then when he turned to go back the bear again "tracked' him in a parallel path. When the person stopped and tried to scare the bear off with noise and rattling cans, the bear came toward him. When the bear got within 30 feet of him, he shot the bear with one lucky shot from a rifle (a 30-30 I think) that felled the bear at his feet. The person left the bear and the empty cartridge case on the ground where he shot the bear.
The person returned with a Ranger who prompty started to stab the bear. The same bear had mauled the Ranger and left him for dead in Kenai a few years before and did it without any provocation. The bear was taken out of season but would have been a Boone & Crocket record size if it were taken in season. It was stuffed and mounted by the State of Alaska and can be seen in various locations as it is moved around the state for display. As I remember it, the head measured 17" across, the paws 9" and it stood 12' tall with an arm spread of 9 feet. Not one to fool with.
The Municipality of Anchorage is very large and mostly wilderness. Many encounters with bear and moose occur. As a police officer there, I have had a couple of occasions when I have had to respond to a "moose in the front yard" call. A police officer friend of mine lived north of the city and one night on the way home on the Glenn HWY, he encountered a moose on the highway. He stopped to let the moose get off the highway. Instead, the moose put his head down and charged his vehicle. He caused about $1600 worth of damage and trotted off to the woods. Any wild animal can be dangerous and should be treated as such. Bears aren't the only one. The can look cute and cuddly, but when if comes down to you and them, it is they who feel threatened and will react. That reaction isn't something you want to be around.
73
Frank
KL7IPV
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by VK2QQ on October 7, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
That's nothing. A weeny little brown bear. You wimp!

In Australia we have Drop Bears. Vicious brutes with 10" claws that drop from trees on unsuspecting passers-by and rip your lungs out. You can't even shout for help!

 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KC8VWM on October 7, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
...Crickey!
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by W4SK on October 7, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
In other words, my bear can whup your bear? In point of fact, there is no real difference in the two species, it is simply a matter of reverse gravity. Naturally, being "down under", the Drop Bears fall in an opposite direction to those in North America.

Besides, all you have to do to protect yourself is to set up a barricade.
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by WA6BFH on October 7, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
I had to chuckle, as the story brought to mind a comment about Ham's by the novelist Thomas Harris. I can't quite remember the comment well enough to quote it but, it can be found in I believe the book "Red Dragon" (it might have been in "Hannibal").
 
Giant mouses  
by KA4KOE on October 7, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Yep, got them too in VK land. Strange though.....they wear boxing gloves and have a pocket on their belly, and are perennially annoyed by Sylvester and his son.

It bears repeating.
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by KE4ZHN on October 10, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
Wow! This situation must have been bearly tolerable! :-)
 
RE: Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by K4JSR on October 10, 2004 Mail this to a friend!
VK2QQ said, "In Australia we have Drop Bears. Vicious brutes with 10" claws that drop from trees on unsuspecting passers-by and rip your lungs out. You can't even shout for help."

Gosh! It must be terrible to walk about in all of those bear droppings! You need to call in a "Koala Tea Control Engineer"!
At least Koala breath can relieve a head cold for a while!

73, Cal K4JSR
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by W0RW on March 7, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
This bear is now famous...It was DF'ed, captured and the capture operation was reported in
March, 2005, p43, QST.
The local Hams found his collar signal and tracked her down...
That was the same bear that snuk up on me at midnight.
Paul w0rw/pm
 
Bear Interrupts DX Operation  
by W0RW on March 7, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
This bear is now famous...It was DF'ed, captured and the capture operation was reported in
March, 2005, p43, QST.
The local Hams found his collar signal and tracked her down...
That was the same bear that snuk up on me at midnight.
Paul w0rw/pm
 
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