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How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:

Jim "Elvis" Seifert (AD6WL) on January 2, 2005
Website: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/QRS-CW/
View comments about this article!


How to Improve Your CW Speed:

You have just passed your code test and now what? You may try listening on the bands and find that the speeds are just to fast for you to even think about trying to copy. This can get very discouraging for a new ham. Many new hams want to operate CW but often find the speeds they hear on the air to be very intimidating. You can just listen to the ARRL CW practice on the air but that gets boring after awhile. There is another option. There is a Yahoo group devoted to QRS CW. This is a great opportunity for new hams to get together with other hams who operate at the same speed and for some of you experienced CW ops to share information with the group and QRS to make contacts with these new hams. I have found the best way to enjoy CW was to make contacts with other hams. After operating QRS for a while you will notice that your speed will start to increase. The website for the group is: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/QRS-CW/.

Here is a list of the unofficial QRS CW operating frequencies. These frequencies are only a guideline as a place for the group to meet and are not part of any band plan. If you hear a slow speed CQ out there then answer the call and enjoy a relaxed QSO at a slower speed.

1.850
3.700
7.124/7.050
10.125
14.050
21.150/21.125
24.8915
28.160

Most QRS activity seems to be on 7.050 & 14.050.

73, Jim
AD6WL

Member Comments:
This article has expired. No more comments may be added.
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by N5EIL on January 2, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
On-The-Air practice is the best way to gain speed on CW, and also a great way to meet new people.

--... ...--
N5EIL, Neil . .
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by N4OZI on January 2, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
This was why the old Novice bands were so popular back in the old days. As a Novice back then, I noticed a bunch of non-Novice stations were operating in the Novice band. It occurred to me that these folks used the Novice band as a way of building their code speed back up before heading down frequency to the higher speed CW segments. At the same time they could say they were just stopping by to help us Novices in making a contact. All in all, it was a win-win situation for all.

Today, there is no more Novice band to the level it was 20 years ago. Having a place on the band for slower CW stations is an excellent idea.

Allen Cutts
N4OZI
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by AB0SI on January 2, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Noyt disagreeing with anything <grin>, just an added suggestion:

If nothing turns up when you CQ on the suggested frequencies, try the FISTS calling frequencies (see www.fist.org). I'm a code newibe -- slow, lots of sending errors, uneven, don't copy well, use the wrong prosign in the wrong place; outside of that my code is WONDERFUL.

Nice folks on the FISTS frequencies.

Another suggestion, particularly for real newbies, is to set-up a sked. this can reduce the fear factor and get you on the air.

The bottom line, of course, is to get on the air! If anyoen wants a QRS sked, I'd be happy to ruin your ear.

Paul AB0SI
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by WA4DOU on January 2, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
By gentlemans agreement we don't operate on cw above 1.840 mhz. and ssb or phone below 1.843 mhz. Therefore I'd recommend that the above be changed to reflect that fact as regards 160 meters.
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by LNXAUTHOR on January 2, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
- thanks for the group info!

- this is the kind of stuff that folks like me need to see here... i've been working very hard over the past month to get my copy and sending up to speed... fortunately for me there's a local bunch of CW ops who are very supportive and encouraging... but i can see how this will help any new CW op looking for help with that first contact... (including me)...
 
Work a pileup!  
by KA5VCQ on January 2, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Thanks for the info on the Yahoo group.

As others have said, there's nothing better than on-the-air practice.

Code has always been a favorite of mine. I got my Novice ticket when I was 12 and all we were allowed at the time was CW. It was a thrill and now, 21 years later, I'm still thrilled when I turn on the radio.

I used to have a problem passing beyond the 20wpm mark, but I used to attempt to copy the fastest code I could find on the band. After a few months, I was copying reliably and found that it was actually harder to listen to slower speeds. It also helps to listen to code a little faster than you can copy and then go down in speed. Kind of a mental crutch for me I guess.

All the practice has really paid off since I am now the "hunted" DX. Because of noise and interference, CW is the best mode for me. It's fun to put out one or two CQ's and then hear the frequency explode into action! I like code the best because it allows me to seek out the weaker stations that I couldn't hear on SSB.

73 to all,

Korey-- YI9VCQ / KA5VCQ
Camp Cooke, Taji, Iraq
 
RE: Work a pileup!  
by K9FV on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I fully agree with the idea of having a set freq for QRS code, but why did freqs in the General portion get picked? Isn't that what the novice segments are for? There are usually places between the broadcast stations where code can be worked most all the time on 40 meters. On 20 meters where there is no novice segment, I understand - but 80 and 40 meters? Why not in the novice segments?

Ken H>
 
RE: Work a pileup!  
by SERGEANT on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Korey,

Stay safe, bud - I'll try to contact you when *I* become the DX in three months... Afghanistan to Iraq shouldn't be too tough, huh?

I don't have my YA call yet, but I'm working on it.

73,
Brad
K0BHC
YA???
 
RE: Work a pileup!  
by AC9TS on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
7110 KHz is the 40M Novice calling frequency. There is usually QRS activity at the lower end of the segment. It does spread out further during daylight hours before the broadcasters turn on.

I've gone thru the 10M, 15M, and 80M Novice segments and have only made 1 contact (on 80M). All my others are on 40M.

See ya on 40M??

Tom - AC9TS
 
RE: Work a pileup!  
by AC9TS on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
7110 KHz is the 40M Novice calling frequency. There is usually QRS activity at the lower end of the segment. It does spread out further during daylight hours before the broadcasters turn on.

I've gone thru the 10M, 15M, and 80M Novice segments and have only made 1 contact (on 80M). All my others are on 40M.

See ya on 40M??

Tom - AC9TS
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by VE3RTS on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Is there one place that lists all the conventions for the bands as to which frequencies are used for calling, DX, beginners etc?

73 VE3RTS
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by WA1RNE on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!

Going on the air to increase code speed is certainly the best way.

There were 3 factors that influenced this in the late 60's / early 70's:

*Band conditions were much better. There was lots of DX on the 15 meter Novice band which really kept me interested. If I wanted to work JA's and Europeans, I had to push myself toward higher speeds. i used to search for JA's around 4-6PM EST after I got home from school. With just 75 watts input (~50 out), a 40 meter dipole (3rd harmonic operation) and about 10 crystals I worked lots of DX.

If it's hard to make Novice contacts now on 15, try it while being "rock-bound". How we were able to pull this off without a VFO is amazing.

*Traffic nets; Back then, there were LOTS of well organized DAILY CW traffic nets running. As you got faster, you took over as net control which really forced you to kick it up a notch.

*Contests like The Novice Roundup, Field Day, 10 meter contest, etc. The Novice Roundup was great and saw lot of participation from higher license classes.

With the deletion of the Novice license and lowering of code speed for licensing to 5 WPM for all classes, there is little incentive for CW traffic nets or slower speed contests. Did the ARRL officers forget this period of amateur radio and how these activities went hand in hand with CW operating proficiency? You bet they did....


Here's some interesting facts that make the current licensing structure seem a bit convoluted:

**Grandfathered Novice and Tech + licensees comprise ~88,000 or 13% of the total U.S. amateur population which probably accounts for the lack of incentive.

**The current Technician licensees account for 39% of all U.S. licensees but can operate only in the Novice CW bands if they pass the CW element of the exam.

**Extra, Advanced and General classes make up 48% of all licensees but are the only ones with expanded HF CW band priviledges.

Interesting how we still require CW for licensing purposes but have no organized sponsorship of CW operating activities for beginners....and the beginner license classes account for 52% of all amateurs.

If a Tech passes the code element, they are still confined to the Novice CW bands.....but they are allowed to blast away with 1500 watts of Phone and CW on our VHF and UHF bands. If the idea is they are not qualified enough to operate in all CW portions of the HF bands, what about the potential for interfering with Public Services, Law Enforcement, etc. on the VHF and UHF bands should their equipment malfunction or be improperly designed or operated??

Doesn't make a lot of sense; at a minimum, Tech's should have expanded CW priviledges throughout the HF bands - that is, if we're really serious about promoting CW operating proficiency.

I hope the Yahoo group sees more members jump on the bandwagon but I think you need to get a few contests going and more nets (even ones that occur on weekends)in the old Novice CW bands to really make a difference.

.....and/or put together and get a better licensing proposal that makes sense for the times.

73, Chris
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by KI7YY on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Great article! There is no better way to develop a good fist and improve your speed than to keep the QSO rate up. 73 cul de KI7YY
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by WB2WIK on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Also, don't be afraid to answer anybody at a slower speed than they are sending, or using to call CQ.

If I call CQ at 30 wpm and receive a readable reply at 5 wpm, I'll respond at 5 wpm and use that speed for the duration of the QSO. I think most CW operators will do the same.

The exception is "contests." However, for a contest-like experience that can provided hundreds of contacts at slower speed, try Field Day. I've experienced a lot of CW ops who began FD at 5 wpm and finished FD at about 20 wpm, increasing their code speed four fold in 24 hours by simply sitting there and making the contacts.

WB2WIK/6
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by KB1GMX on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
w1rne:

Other than ARRL and the WIAW code practice support is left to local elmers.

I for one would love to see CW nets on 6m and 2M or just plain more CW there. Heck there are plenty of good multimode radios for those bands.

Allison
KB1GMX
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by NG1I on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I fully agree with all comments but what I suggest is what I did. I put the pencil down and tried copying in my head and only made notes on paper. Scary at first but you be surprised at your increased speed in copying in your head.
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by W5ESE on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I like this post!

It's probably faster to use software to increase
code speed, but it's much more fun to make QSO's.
Plus learning CW operating privileges to boot.

Some other frequencies to listen to are 3686 khz
and 7121 khz. There are Rockmites available for
these frequencies, which are in the Novice/Tech+
segments. Rockmites are alot of fun and are
available from
http://smallwonderlabs.com/Rockmite.htm
No affiliation with the company.

73
Scott W5ESE
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by WA6CDE on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I too have been a little surprised that the FCC got rid of the novice bands... oh well... just because they say its gone... doesn't mean we can't keep using them as such... why to think they just might want to re-consider making them the cw part of the band again if its full of operators making cw contacts...


I have also run into some of the others who think that cw should be sent from a keyboard... and received by electronic decoders... or computers... which I kinda view as a way of cheating on the learning part... even though they say its ... backup... It really is all about basics... and manually doing something... That is the fun in it... hey if you didn't get the letters and all... then what one needs to do is ask for it to be re-sent... their is no degrades ion or embarrassment in asking... so egos should not be dictating the fun one should have...

But,.... WE hams who have mastered the code should also remember that the guy on the other end ... hasn't quite gotten to our speed yet and thus... clock ourselves to a speed to allow them to copy ... even if they blast along at a faster speed... remember they probably can send a lot faster than they can copy... so setting the speed at a set level that they can copy 90 percent of the time... is highly recommended... this instills the effort to improve until one reaches his set level.

We ... are trainers... on the air instructors... if you like... and as such should also help them to improve and develop their skills... I try and send the characters at about 13-18 wpm... but, the total word speed is down around 5-10 wpm... i.e fast on the letters so they develop the proper method of hearing the charter... but, slow enough for them to write it down and read. To come from high speed down to doing that is challenging for the advanced ham....and not as easy as one thinks.

Some may disagree with this method but, it seems to be the correct one as others have suggested in the new training methods.

Of course the old ham radio club meeting with theory and code practice may be a thing of the past... but, might be a good idea... to re-invent??....

As to 2 mtr on the air simplex is good too... we used to have a great time on the repeater sending audio code through FM... but the repeater owner didn't like it... so he stopped any further get to geathers due to complaints from other pickle squeezers who were not interested in the code sending...even though it was late night... So the group moved down to 144.1 and continues today... locally... with everyone going back up to voice to confirm and discuss the transmission by CW.... Its growing and getting quite popular...
. most are beginners who are trying to learn the code on the air...as they can't attend any club meetings or none exists in their area... sometimes we get down to 5 wpm or so with round table discussions... hey its all fun... but,....

Why... asked one... 2MTR FM PS voice operator... Well their is something in our nature to excel... and we derive fun out of being able to compete and improve our learning...

HF CW... may I suggest that all those who want to continue their education and improvement of CW continue to use the Old Novice bands... so others will know where to find 'em... 7.040 and others get so congested now that one can't find a place without interference or requiring a narrow CW filter... so why not spread out... dial around in the old novice band area... and hunt out that rock bound CW station... its a lot of fun as well as educational... best reality thing around... besides think of the PRIDE that one gets after making contact on that rock bound CW transmitter he constructed with his own hands... for a few bucks...

Its not about the money... its about making memories... Pride and achievement...accomplishment... its alive today as it was back in the marconi days... there is nothing as great as some kid (be they 10 or 70 years old) that has achieved something... like mastering the code... and feeling good about it...

Just my 2 cents worth...

73's WA6CDE
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by WA1RNE on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!

KB1GMX;

Sure, there are plenty of multi-mode 6 & 2 meter rigs in use. Problem is, there's scant CW activity on those bands - unless you get a 1/2 hour DX opening.

The only incentive I had to drive up my code speed was the thrill of working DX - and SSB and high power priviledges on the horizon.

Fortunately for me, band conditions were decent and there were thousands of licensed Novices doing the same thing.

....and one last but very important incentive; Novice licenses expired in 2 years. I upgraded to General ~18 months after my Novice was issued.

73, Chris
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by WN2A on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Great Idea. Lots of us like to work QRS. It doesn't matter if it's a new or experienced op, either. The message still gets through.
Also, by using a PC with soundcard and any one of the CW decoding programs that are available, one can have a "second op" in the shack to provide the "fill" copy. I do that anyway; helps when I get an interruption from someone at home,etc. A short list of those available are:
CWGet
MRP40
CWdecoder
MultiPSK
Mix32
HamScope
CWLab02 (from me at www.qsl.net/wn2a)

None of these will perform miracles with poor timing or very noisy conditions , but its an easy way to have some backup copy during a QSO.
CU on the Bands!
Mike,WN2A
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by W6TH on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!

Now when did this happen? Gentlemans agreement? Not true.


By gentlemans agreement we don't operate on cw above 1.840 mhz. and ssb or phone below 1.843 mhz. Therefore I'd recommend that the above be changed to reflect that fact as regards 160 meters.
===================================================
LISTEN UP:
There is and never was such a thing. You as CW operators have the right and can operate on any frequency that is not being used, so go for the open frequencies even if it is claimed to be a SSB allocation. As a CW operator, you may operate on the 40 meter band from 7.000Khz to the higher end of 7.300Khz. This also includes all the ham bands.

Slow speed operators need to move from the heavy traffic so you may concentrate on getting your speed up and not having any interference to disturb your practice.

I think it is great that all want to improve your code speed and I stand right behind you. Operate where you find the quiet spot and don't worry about the "gentlemans agreement".

.: 73 W6th, the dot and dash scientist.
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by KD5IVP on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Good ideas all. Once a year, our club teaches "Morse Code Boot Camp". In five nights, with a testing session the last night, those who stick with it pass the exam. We start at 10 wpm...new students don't know the difference. Since I'm the main teacher, I'm absolutely convinced the only thing holding someone back from using their new skill is 1)We've convinced new hams that learning code is only for passing a dinky 5 minute exam and 2) the lack of Elmering. During the breaks, the students tune around the bands and actually copy more than they thought they would.
So, as homework, I give the students a typical QSO script to work from and upon passing the exam, they get to jump in feet first and get on the air!
I'm sure we all remember the 'white knuckles rush' experienced when our 1st CQ was answered. Very scary stuff....and once they've recovered from the shock, they'er drawn to try it again. So, not only is listening vastly important in ramping up the code speed, actually getting a call out on the air will do amazing things.
After they've used the mode a few weeks, the pencil is tossed away and only log info may be copied. 20+ wmp comes along in a few days.
paul, KD5IVP
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by N4ZOU on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
My two favorite Ham activities were. One, running novice classes back when two or more general (or higher) class hams could give the tests and hand out 610's for those who could pass the novice requirements for there FCC novice license. Two, getting on the novice bands and running whatever speed the novice or higher ham could manage so they could get their speed up. The most fun I ever had was providing a new ham with his first CW contact. I could care less if it took 2 minutes or 2 hours to get the contact information passed both ways on that first contact as I remember my first contact with a barrowed straight key and HF rig. Novice testing was regulated to VE only, which just took all the fun out of it. Then they ground us up by eliminating the novice license and bands altogether. If I had any influence at all (and I don't), I would reinstate passing out novice tickets in the old novice bands with the addition of 160 meters and CW only including 10 meters. Make it the same as in the good old days when just two general or higher hams could give the tests but make the license good for only 2 years in which time you either upgrade or get a waver for military or other such public service. After 2 years you will upgrade or you find you don't care for ham radio at all. I would also like to see novice only calls like 3 by 3, three letters, one number, and three more letters as listed in the books on possible US calls. Upgrading would require a call change but everyone would know youíre a novice and other hams would be on the look out for novice contacts for that "special" call sign.
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by W1SFO on January 3, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I recently stumbled across an interesting method for learning code based on the 1930s studies of German psychologist Dr. Ludwig Koch. (I think it's pronounced "cook"; please correct me if I'm wrong.) His work is outlined superbly in "The Art and Skill of Radio-Telegraphy" by William G. Pierpont, N0HFF, at:

http://www.geocities.com/gm0rse/n0hff/contents.htm

In a nutshell, you start learning to copy code at a lickety-split rate like 15, 18, 20 wpm -- but only two letters (the "k" and "m"). When you can copy these letters for five minutes with 90% accuracy you add a third letter (the "r"). And so it goes; whenever you can copy five minutes at 90% you add another letter (the "s," "u," "a," "p," "t," etc.) until you know them all.

The idea behind his method is to make copying an automatic response; there's no little lookup table in your head, no set of mental flashcards to turn over. You go right from the sound pattern to scribbling on paper.

I found a wonderful computer program to help me in this endeavor written by Ray Goff, G4FON, in Oxford. It's available on the web (like what isn't?) at:

http://www.qsl.net/g4fon/

If you want to learn code only to pass the FCC test this approach will probably take too much of your time; there are faster ways to get to five wpm. But, I hope, this method will put me into the fast lane pronto.

73, Poor Richard, W1SFO
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by W0FEN on January 4, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
The coerrect url is:

http://www.fists.org/

This is NOT the porn site.
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by K3VW on January 4, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
1.850 is a SSB " Rag chew " frequency. Most of the CW activity occurs below 1.843 khz. I know CW can operate anywhere on 160 meters but "most" CW takes place lower in the band. Please don't encourage folks to operate CW where it will increase conflict!
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by K3VW on January 4, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
1.850 is a SSB " Rag chew " frequency. Most of the CW activity occurs below 1.843 khz. I know CW can operate anywhere on 160 meters but "most" CW takes place lower in the band. Please don't encourage folks to operate CW where it will increase conflict!
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by KB6NU on January 4, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I'll second NG1I's recommendation to put down the pen or pencil and start copying in your head. I only started getting faster when I quit copying cold turkey. It makes sense if you think about it--I don't have enough brainpower to copy code and write it down at the same time. :)

Chances are that you can't write everything down at 20 wpm anyway, so the sooner you quit copying by hand the better. Besides, now that the only exam requirement is 5 wpm, there's certainly no need to copy it onto paper any faster than that.
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by KY1V on January 4, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
WA4DOU Wrote:

"By gentlemans agreement we don't operate on cw above 1.840 mhz. and ssb or phone below 1.843 mhz. Therefore I'd recommend that the above be changed to reflect that fact as regards 160 meters."

Don't you just love it when someone else tells you what to do?

Funny, I wasn't invited to this meeting of gentlemen that made this rule and I bet you and WA4DOU weren't invited either.

So, I ask, just whom are these gentlemen that made this agreement? What are their call signs. Who gave them the authority to make this agreement on our behalf.

No need to ask the question who enforces the agreement. We all know who does that. Just try and operate CW on 1.850 and you will find out.

That's right. Those people are anonymous and do not dare give their call signs. While you are operating perfectly legal CW on 1.850, the gentlemen that enforce this bewildering agreement will illegally jam you, curse you and do whatever is necessary to ensure that you don't break their law.

Seriously, just think about it for a moment.

David ~ KY1V



PS: On a side note. I would like to know what modes are permitted between 1.840 and 1.843. Let's see. My FC rule book says CW, RTTY, data, phone and image. Who do I go by? WA4DOU and the gentlemen or the FCC?

We report...you decide!
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by KC8VWM on January 4, 2005 Mail this to a friend!

"So, I ask, just whom are these gentlemen that made this agreement? What are their call signs. Who gave them the authority to make this agreement on our behalf."

My Thoughts:

The reason why Amateurs are not inundated with even more FCC rules and regs than we have now is because we have these gentleman's agreements in place.

Last thing we want to start doing in amateur radio is prompt the FCC regulation machine into motion so they can start regulating us with even more restrictions because of a dispute over a long standing gentleman's agreement we currently have in place.

Now we can "opt" to change a gentleman's agreement if we would like, but perhaps it should be done through other channels like perhaps the ARRL for instance.

I feel it is important to remember that deregulation and not more regulation should be the primary goal in mind when discussing bandplans and gentleman's agreements.

Ok , nuff of my soapbox.. your turn..

73

Charles - KC8VWM
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by WA4DOU on January 4, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
W6TH is 100% correct. You may operate anywhere in the bands with cw where you have privileges but he advocates anarchy in doing so. CW by custom belongs only in certain parts of the band. I'm ashamed of him for offering up such advice.

As for KY1V, the model of character by whomever bestowed on him the title of amateur of the year. He displays a lack of understanding and character for all to see in his post. Very unbecomming but perhaps a role model for the increasingly lower IQ amateur radio service as it follows the primrose path to hell.

Jack Kilpatrick is quoted as having said, " Civilized men build institutions for barbarians to tear down". He is correct. Behold the barbarians.
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by WA1RNE on January 5, 2005 Mail this to a friend!

This stink about operating CW across the HF bands isn't justified considering:

1) The amount of unused band space we have on any given day;

2) It's being implied that Gentleman's agreements for the HF bands are the equivalent of installing a repeater on a particular VHF frequency. Nobody is supposed to use the input or output - ONLY when it's in operation.

There's only one reason why I never used 14.230 mc when it wan't being used by SSTV ops; you never knew when someone running SSTV would just come barging in - in accordance with the ARRL sponsored "Gentleman's Agreement".

Talk about the pot calling the kettle black !!

Anyone want to start thinking again about better band utilization plans or just stick with the "tried and true" but slightly contradictory Gents Agreements??
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by KE5C on January 5, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
CW IS NO FUN until you are fluent, until it is another language you understand and speak. My friend's father copied 60 wpm using a typewriter during WWII, but he had no idea what he was typing until he read it. His brain was trained to trigger certain finger movements in response to certain sounds. You can train your brain to do the same thing with a pencil by writing letters down as you "copy" CW, but you will have NO FUN because you are not learning the language.

When you are ready to HAVE FUN, learn CW as a language. Whether you listen to computer generated code or listen on the air, put down the pencil and LISTEN to the letters as you hear them. Form a mental image of the letter as it goes by. As thousands and thousands have said, to do this, you need letters coming at some reasonable speed so you hear the component dits and dashes as just one sustained sound. I commonly see 15 to 20 wpm reported as the speed below which letters "fall apart". Obviously you increase the spacing between letters early on so you actual average speed is much less than 15 wpm. As you get used to seeing and thinking of the letters as you listen, start listening for short words. This is easier at a slightly higher speed, and with normal letter spacing. For me, words start to "fall apart" below 20 wpm or so.

I tried to do all this, but I still would get nervous and cheat by using the pencil, and while I could copy 20 to 25 wpm, I could not understand it until I read what I had written, and it really was NO FUN. What really got me going in the correct direction was operating cw mobile. Have you tried copying CW with a pencil while you are driving? CW/m puts you in a position where you will copy in your head, or you won't copy at all. Whenever I am in the car, I try to turn the FT857 on and at least copy a few QSO's. I try to find folks going a bit faster than I can completely copy, and now I listen mostly for words, and it's a LOT OF FUN.

So put the pencil down, and for heaven's sake, don't waste your time with random code groups. Copy real words and phrases so you are listening not only for letters but for complete words from the beginning. Close your eyes and listen. If you're sending, send your letters at 15 wpm or higher, and space them out to achieve a slower word speed. I am always tempted to send my letters with natural spacing at whatever QRS speed I am answering, but that does the QRS fellow no good at all.

73, John
http://www.kkn.net/~ke5c/mobile/
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by WA4DOU on January 5, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
And whats wrong with trying to comply with gentlemens agreements? It used to work quite well when amateurs were respectful of one another. Today its published under the title "Considerate Operators Frequency Guide" or some such by the ARRL but it all means the same thing. If you won't willingly take your place in amateur radio and attempt to adapt to custom, don't blame anyone but yourself if you develop a reputation as a bastard ham. True, no one owns a frequency. But its something entirely different and not akin to that at all that convention and custom has outlined areas of spectrum for various modes. Freedom isn't free and none of us are a law unto ourselves. Wise men voluntarily adapt.
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by K5USS on January 5, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I agree 100%! My copy has gone up at least 20-30% since I began attempting on air QSOs in code. I still have to utilize the "graphite memory" ( a pencil) but I catch most of it just before I write it down. But then again, I cannot remember what I had for dinner the night before most days...

Charlie
K5USS
FISTS 11234
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by KY1V on January 5, 2005 Mail this to a friend!

WA4DOU wrote:

"As for KY1V, the model of character by whomever bestowed on him the title of amateur of the year. He displays a lack of understanding and character for all to see in his post. Very unbecomming but perhaps a role model for the increasingly lower IQ amateur radio service as it follows the primrose path to hell."

My post does not display any lack of understanding.

You and others preach deregulation by the government, a body that regulates under power bestowed upon it by the people whom it governs, yet you would have me "regulated" by some gentlemen's agreement made by people for whom I am not even aware. There is no option for redress as is the case with the government. And you say W6TH advocates anarchy? Let's just deregulate everything and perhaps have no government at all?

And you question my IQ?

Since you obviously believe your IQ is considerably higher than my own how is it you missed that my post was meant to be provocative and stimulate thought rather than an attack on the status quo? Should one not ask why rather than follow like sheep?

Now, shall we speak of character?

In your profile, your very first sentence is an attack upon people whom have an opinion that is different than your own! Why am I not surprised?

"Those who say that cw is old-fashioned, antiquated and obsolete, reveal a shallow and superficial understanding not only of cw but of amateur radio itself."

Is this behavior your standard modus operandi?

Simply because I intended to stimulate people thinking about this issue does not give rise to any fact that I have ever violated a single gentleman's agreement in the 29 years I have been an amateur. There are many laws and rules in this world of which I do not agree, but this does not have any bearing upon my compliance with those laws and rules.

Most importantly, I do not belittle people simply because they have an opinion with which I do not agree, however, let it be known that I will bite once attacked.

Perhaps a look in the mirror is in order before the next time you question another's character, Mr. Lincoln. You may be surprised at what you see glaring back at you.

David ~ KY1V

PS: IQ Test - Should one learn to spell unbecoming correctly or use a spell checker?

Hint: There are two correct answers!

 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by WA4DOU on January 5, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Ladies and gentlemen, " behold, your ham of the year". I rest my case!
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by WB9QEL on January 5, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
LET ME SAY THIS FIRST AND FORMOST. I REALLY LOVE THIS HOBBY. I HAVE READ ALL OF THE COMMENTS ABOUT HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR MORSE CODE SPEED. I READ THEM, TO DO JUST THAT, IMPOROVE MY CODE SPEED. I JUST LOOK AT LIKE THIS, IF I HAVE TIME TO COME DOWN TO THE BASEMENT AND ENJOY A HOBBY SUCH AS THIS, CHECK OUT THE RADIO TRAFFIC, MAKE A CONTACT, OR LOOK UP SOMETHING ON E-HAM, I'M PRETTY ALRIGHT. IF YOU DON'T BELIEVE THAT LOOK AROUND AT WHAT WE HAVE, AND THEN LOOK AROUND THE WORLD. WE HAVE ALOT TO BE THANKFUL FOR. I HAVE PROBABLY SAID TOO MUCH ALREADY. ENJOY THE HOBBY GENTLEMEN. 73'S

NICK ASHLEY
W9ZXT
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by KC8VWM on January 5, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
"You and others preach deregulation by the government, a body that regulates under power bestowed upon it by the people whom it governs, yet you would have me "regulated" by some gentlemen's agreement made by people for whom I am not even aware."


David my friend, there are no strangers you are not aware of when you are in the company of the many gentleman who are involved with Amateur Radio.

After all, we must not forget that we are one big family of the same color of interests here. I respect anyone's opinion even though I might not always agree with them.

I always try and honor another radio amateurs opinion and try to see and understand the other persons point of view in a respectable fashion regardless of my own personal beliefs on the subject.

Nick, W9ZXT has also demonstated he too is a gentleman, like yourself and I tend to agree with his wise insight toward Amateur Radio.

73

Charles - KC8VWM
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by WB8JKR on January 6, 2005 Mail this to a friend!

Not a new idea. That's what the Novice license with
no phone access was for.

Mark WB8JKR
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by W6IML on January 6, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
www.fist.org is a porn site bud....
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by KY1V on January 6, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Charles,

I have no particular issue with the idea behind a gentlemen's agreement, but one must keep in mind that it is only an agreement amongst gentlemen that agree and should not be enforced upon those that do not. It should also be noted that simply because someone does not agree, nor abide by the agreement, he is no less of a gentlemen and within his right to operate within the law.

I make the point only to stimulate thought amongst those that believe they have some God given duty to enforce those gentlemen's agreements. I believe Roy to be one of those people. Perhaps I am wrong, but based on his attitude, all indications point in that direction.

If you are a believer in the gentlemen's agreement, and you come across a person whom does not agree, and interrupt his QSO to tell him to move, deliberately interfere with him, send SSTV over top of him, play music or do any of those other annoying things that some people do to enforce the agreement, than whom is truly the gentlemen? Certainly not the enforcer!

The appropriate thing to do would be to wait until the person is finished with his current contact, call him and politely inform him of the gentlemen's agreement. Then, if he does not agree to the agreement and wants to continue to operate in a legal manner outside of the gentlemen's agreement, you should respect his right and leave him alone!

The FCC doesn't enforce these agreements, nor do official observers or the ARRL. So what gives any single ham the right to enforce them?

The current "agreements" are fine. What I take issue with is the people whom believe they are entitled to enforce them upon others.

By the way, thanks for the Christmas card Charles. It was most thoughtful and a pleasant surprise.

Happy New Year...yes, to your to Roy

David ~ KY1V

PS. Roy, it seems you are hung up on this ham of the year thing. I am not sure why but you really need to get over it. It is not healthy for an old timer like yourself. Besides, it is 2005 and I am no longer Amateur of the Year. Perhaps that will bring you some comfort and you won't be so grumpy now!




 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by KC8VWM on January 6, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
"you come across a person whom does not agree, and interrupt his QSO to tell him to move, deliberately interfere with him, send SSTV over top of him, play music or do any of those other annoying things that some people do to enforce the agreement, than whom is truly the gentlemen?"

Can't argue with that logic. This would not only be considered to be ungentlemanly like conduct but it is also illegal regardless of what that slice of frequency is really intended for.

Your welcome David, and I sincerely hope you and your family have a most prosperous new year.

As far as people being hung up on your amateur of the year award goes, I think they are most likely trying to get you fired up for entertainment value. I admit, I was a part of this badgering crowd but if people learn about who you are and what road you travelled they might have another opinion.

I eventually learned about the work and mentoring you unselfishly invested back into the hobby for almost 3 decades and I really think you deserve it. It's not like they bestowed you with the honor from a 50/50 draw at a local hamfest.

Truth is there are many good people that frequent this website who share in the same interest of radio communications. We are all brother's and sister's playing on the same team.

People can either participate as gentlepeople and be part of it, or cause problems for it. ...It is up to them to decide what is in the best interests and future of Amateur Radio either way they choose.

... and I have complete confidence that every gentleperson involved in amateur radio today only wants the quality of the Amateur Radio experience to flourish and get better for every paticipant involved.

73

Charles - KC8VWM
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by W5ESE on January 6, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I agree with KC8VWM in sticking to the CW subbands
for operating CW, and below 1843 khz on 160 meters.
The exception being during the ARRL 160 meter
contest (a CW only contest). The ARRL recommended
operating between 1800-1875 khz during the contest.

The 160m SSB guys gave us a wide berth, and I didn't
hear any 160m SSB below 1875 khz during the contest.
I appreciated that. Must be why they call it the
"gentleman's band".

73
Scott W5ESE
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by N6FB on January 7, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
AS A LONG TIME QRQ OPERATOR--50 TO 65 WPM- I AM OFTEN ASKED HOW TO GAIN CW RECEIVING PROFICIENCY.

OTHER THAN ON THE AIR PRACTICE, THERE ARE TWO KEYS TO SUCCESS:

1- THROW AWAY YOUR PENCIL AND LEARN TO COPY IN YOUR HEAD AS SOON AS YOU GET YOUR TICKET. WRITING DOWN WHAT YOU HEAR AUTOMATICALLY LIMITS YOUR COPYING SPEED TO YOUR WRITING SPEED, PLUS THE NEED TO DO TWO THINGS AT ONCE ( COPYING AND WRITING), OCCUPIES THE BRAIN WITH TWO TASKS INSTEAD OF ONE. KIND OF LIKE WALKING AND CHEWING GUM AT THE SAME TIME.

2- AS SOON AS YOU CAN COPY AT A REASONABLE SPEED IN YOUR HEAD, START TRAINING YOURSELF TO COPY WITH NO CONSCIOUS EFFORT, BY READING A MAGAZINE AT THE SAME TIME. YOU WILL BE AMAZED HOW FAST YOUR BRAIN LEARNS TO SPLIT THE TWO TASKS AND LET YOU DO THEM SIMULTANEOUSLY. YOU WIL KNOW WHEN YOU ARE ACHIEVING THIS WHEN YOU STOP HEARING LETTERS AND START TO HEAR WORDS,AND THEN PHRASES IN ONE PIECE. THE BEST ANALOGY I HAVE TO THIS TRICK IS HOW YOU CAN WATCH A BALL GAME ON TV, AND LISTEN TO AND RESPOND TO YOUR XYL SIMULTANEOUSLY!!
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by KC0SOG on January 7, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I've been gathering from this discussion that most ops will slow down if you answer at a slower speed. Being a new CW op myself, I have a question on answering a CQ being sent by an op that is slightly faster than I can copy. Would it be appropriate to answer a CQ as follows? K**** K**** de KC0SOG KCOSOG QRS? Or would this make me look foolish?

Thanks,
Doug - KC0SOG
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by KY1V on January 7, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Doug (KC0SOG),

Your question is quite subjective and I have no doubt there are a variety of opinions amongst those reading this thread.

If the other station is sending too fast, you only have two choices, ask him to slow down or don't copy his transmission. I only suggest you send "pse QRS" rather than just QRS.

A truly good CW op won't need you to ask him to QRS as he will hear the speed at which you reply and adjust his accordingly. The only problem with this being that many people send at speeds faster than they are able to copy.

About those that won't slow down for you, well, you can imagine how they will answer this question. As for the rest of the fine CW operators out there, your request is not foolish, but should not be necessary.

David ~ KY1V
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by KB9YGD on January 7, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Hi Jim & Everyone.Learnig CW To Get Upgraded Is Not Learning CW.One Must Spend Hundred`s Of Hours Working Other CW Operator`s And Learning All The Ways To Shorten Words,Etc.I Think The Best Place To Do This Is 7.100 To 7.150 mhz On 40 Meters.There Is No Shortage Of Operator`s In This Area Who Do Good CW At A Slower Speed.By the Way Fast CW speed Does Not Allways Mean Good CW.Generaly The Guys That Do The Very Fast CW Have Used it And Studied It for 40 Or more Years.73, Norm From Lake Station,Indiana.
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by W3DCG on January 7, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Very important I believe, is learning the fundamentals properly.

Go by sound.
Never think in dots and dashes.

V = ...-, what?
Don't even start that way, if you did, stop as soon as you can.
v= di di di dah.

I crutched myself as a child, no one emphasized this point to me. So when I started learning, I even put a dot dot dot and dash on the paper. This makes your brain have to translate that visual symbol via some form of Look Up Table in your mind. It will slow you down.

Learn it by sound, hear it, then visualize the letter.

Once you have all the letters, numbers, basic prosigns this way, THEN work on speed. Don't even THINK about speed until this point. Once you get past oh, I don't know, 13 wpm maybe?, then start head copying ASAP.
I cannot agree more about head copy. Start head copying as much as possible- call it laziness if it helps you to toss the pen.

I find for me, head copying is easier at moderate to higher speeds. Past 35 wpm it's all I can do, for if I could write that fast, I surely could not read my chicken scratch.
Soon you'll be recognizing common words and word abbreviations by sound, eventually you won't hear characters as much as whole words, at least commonly used words... and then you'll be amazed and loving it, wondering how that happened. And it will happen, if you keep doing, it happens much sooner than you might imagine.
Get on with some FISTS, they truely are very friendly.
73.
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by N5PVL on January 7, 2005 Mail this to a friend!

A great article, and many of the comments are interesting and fun to read.

My morse code speed developed on the lower end of 40 meters. I had a morning schedule with my father WA5ZRP and afterward I would try for a few QRS contacts while the band held out.

As time went by, I slowly developed my speed without realizing it. On the slow code, I worked at sending very consistently and clearly and my efforts were rewarded more than once by being on the other end of somebody's first CW contact.

Lots of fun!

Charles Brabham, N5PVL
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by AE6QF on January 8, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Practice with CW beginners in China. Look for BD & perhaps BG prefix stations between 7.050 to 7.070 mHz. If there are strong JA signals on Forty, the path to China may be open too.
It's lots more fun than talkin' to teeny-weenies with walkee-talkees on 2 meter FM repeaters..

73, Quiet-Finger, AE6QF, (ex-K2JXF)
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by W5ESE on January 8, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
KC0SOG
------

> I've been gathering from this discussion that
> most ops will slow down if you answer at a
> slower speed

Yes, most will. Some will tell you never answer a
'CQ' that is faster than you can copy, but,
personally, I'd much prefer to get an answer at
any speed than have an unanswered 'CQ'. I suspect
that a sizable majority of CW ops feel the same
way.

Perhaps send:
? de KC0SOG PSE QRS K

if you weren't able to get the call sign.

73
Scott W5ESE


 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by KB6NU on January 9, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Scott W5ESE says:
> Some will tell you never answer a 'CQ'
> that is faster than you can copy, but,
> personally, I'd much prefer to get an
> answer at any speed than have an
> unanswered 'CQ'. I suspect that a sizable
> majority of CW ops feel the same way.

I certainly feel that way. Feel free to call me any time at any speed.

73!

Dan KB6NU
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by VE3XDB on January 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!

In the mid-90's, I was determined to get on HF. I worked hard to get my CW, failed my first 12 wpm attempt, but passed my 5 wpm. I was really determined, because I wanted to work my father in law on SSB, so I started operating CW on 80 metres, to get better at it. At that time, 80 metres was the only HF band available to 5 wpm operators.

Well, after awhile, I took my 12 wpm test, and it seemed very slow. The examiner wondered why I hadn't taken it earlier, because it was very easy for me. After working so hard to get my HF priviledges, it seemed a shame to give up on CW. Besides, I had come to enjoy CW, and found the CW operators to be courteous and helpful.

Today, I can copy up to 30wpm on a good day, but am most comfortable between 20 and 25wpm. I was looking at my logbook the other day. In 2004, I had about 200 QSO's. About 10 of them were SSB, the rest were CW.

My advice to people trying to increase their speed is continue to practice on the air, and try to find someone that is operating at the top end of your current speed range. Let theme know that you are working at the top end of your range, and they will help you practice at whatever speed you want.

FISTS members are good people to work. Go to the FISTS frequencies, find a qso, and let the other person know what you are trying to accomplish. You will get the patient help you need!

Good luck,

Doug Behl VE3XDB
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by N6FB on January 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
MY COMMENTS OF A FEW DAYS AGO, PLUS ONLY A VERY FEW OTHERS, TALK ABOUT HOW YOU CAN IMPROVE YOUR SPEED, BY TAKING SOME ACTION ON YOUR OWN PART. MOST OF THE OTHER RESPONSES TALK ABOUT HOW TO GET OTHER OPS TO QRS.

WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO THE CONCEPT OF PLAIN OLD HARD WORK?? I KNOW THE FCC NOW HANDS OUT TICKETS ON A SILVER PLATTER, BUT THOSE OF YOU WHO ARE REALLY INTERESTED IN GETTING BETTER CAN DO IT BEST BY WORKING HARD, USING TIPS ON HOW TO DO THAT HARD WORK FROM OLD TIMERS LIKE ME.

IT SEEMS THAT THE WHOLE WORLD IS DUMMYING DOWN TO THE LOWEST COMMON DENOMINATOR. YOU DONT GET A'S IN SCHOOL BY WORKING ANYMORE-- YOU JUST CLAIM YOU ARE SOCIALLY DISADVANTAGED, AND THE LAWYERS WILL BE SURE THE TEACHER GIVES YOU THE A YOU SO RICHLY DESERVE.
 
How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by KC0SOG on January 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
William,

With all due respect, I think discussions on how to get an operator to QRS does apply in this thread. As new CW ops, we want to get on the air and make contacts as you have suggested. But, at the same time, we want to learn the proper procedure so we don't sound like "Lids!"

We do work hard and practice as much as we can. We rely on experienced ops to slow down a bit so we can participate too.

I won't address the licensing issue.

When I go home tonight and after the kids homework is all squared away, I will practice sending a little CW into my dummy load, then listen a while to W1AW.

After that, I'll hang out in the 7100 to 7150 portion of the band and get QRM'ed to death by the SW stations in my compromised shack and antenna installation trying pick a slower CW op out of the noise to make a QSO with!

73, Doug - KC0SOG
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by AC9TS on January 10, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Geez Bill (N6FB),

I was wondering how long it was going to take for some old timer to come in and hijack the thread with a "dummed down" post.

There are countless threads here and on QRZ about old timers saying that morse code needs to be part of the license structure. Here are a group of hams that have an interest in code and you give them grief for asking for a QRS. Should they sit and listen for months on end to get their code speed up? Who is it going to hurt if they ask for a little assistance in making some contacts? The speed will come with 2 way contacts, not just listening.

Have a nice life,

Tom - AC9TS
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by KB9BIT on January 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
I work about 95% CW, mostly on 20m or 40m. Have been at it for about 15 years. Although I can comfortably copy 15-20 WPM, I still enjoy getting up early on Saturday or Sunday mornings and looking for QRS contacts in the 40m "Novice" part of the band. Anyone looking for a QRS QSO, look for me there or drop me an email and well set up a time and frequency.

73
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by W5ESE on January 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
N6FB

One thing that is very different today than when I was
cutting my teeth in this hobby (1976) is the relative
paucity today of folks working on advancing their CW
skills from 5wpm to 13wpm and higher.

Of course, this is because 13wpm proficiency is no
longer required to gain 'phone privileges, and
20wpm proficiency won't help you acquire any new
privileges. All you get today is the fun of being
able to use CW more proficiently.

In 1976, I could operate in the Novice bands and work
any of THOUSANDS of other Novices similarly trying to
reach that magic 13wpm level.

Today, someone working on improving their CW skills
will for the most part be hearing CW operators who
have been at it literally for decades. The bands
sound somewhat more intimidating for a CW newcomer
today than they used to (fewer other CW newbies).

So I feel that accepted on-the-air practice should
be modified to reflect the new reality that CW
newcomers as often as not will need to Shanghai us
CW old timers into having QSOs with them at the
speed that they're comfortable with.

My 2c

Scott W5ESE
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by AD6WL on January 11, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Thanks to all who gave comments and to those of you who joined the group. But, most of the thanks go to the operators out there who are operating on the bands and helping out by slowing down when necessary. I do believe that is part of the Amateurís Code.

This group we have is for hams that are not speed demons but want to operate CW. Some will increase code speed rapidly while it will take the others some time. The main thing is that we are on the air actually operating with CW and not just listening to some computer generated code or code tapes. It is a lot more fun to have a QSO and log that person than to sit and monitor ARRL code practice. I will, however, listen to ARRL code practice when I want to push myself past my limits on receiving code.

We do discuss operating procedures, techniques and we schedule on air QSOs with like-minded QRS operators. It is a lot fun to meet new hams that have the same operating capabilities and get to help each other out. We donít discus code/no-code and licensing.

Well, I hope to hear a lot of you on the bands. Be it CW, phone or digital modes.

73, Jim
AD6WL
 
RE: How to Improve Your Morse Code Speed:  
by IW2CZG on February 18, 2005 Mail this to a friend!
Hi !

I think that you will be interested in knowing that
I'm publishing on the web the CW lessons I'm receiving
at the Milano section of ARI.

I'm recording each lesson with a digital recorder, then I'm converting the audio files in MP3 format and I'm preparing also the "solution" file in Excel format.

The lessons are available on:
http://www.migliavacca.net/Lezioni%20CW.htm

Here in Italy, more than a few people are remotely learning CW with these lessons. Ok, the website is mostly in Italian language, but CW is universal. I whish my job will help some other OMs in the learning of the CW.

Pls enjoy!

Regards,
Luca IW2CZG


 
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