Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Legacy Iambic  (Read 4859 times)
K5LXP
Member

Posts: 5293


WWW

Ignore
« on: January 11, 2016, 07:38:47 PM »


I have a seemingly rare Permaflex iambic paddle, which was first advertised in December 1968 Ham Radio magazine.  About that time the keyer kit the founder of Digi-Key created was offered.  But, it's not an iambic keyer, just a single paddle type.  The ubiquitous Ten Tec and Heathkit iambic keyers didn't appear for a few years after that.  I understand the Curtis EK-38 keyer was offered about that time, but for the price I suspect not many were sold.  The venerable 8043/8044 inexpensive keyer chips didn't appear for another few years.  There are a number of single paddle keyers, keyer kits and keyer articles before and since the availability of the Permaflex paddle, but I'm wondering what *iambic* keyers might have been available at that time to plug one into?   

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
 
Logged
AA4OO
Member

Posts: 96


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2017, 11:49:28 AM »

I'm curious about this as well.  I see that Vibroplex made their first single lever paddle in 1960, so I assume keyers were starting to appear but dual lever paddles didn't seem to arrive until quite a bit later.  I wonder when iambic modes appeared in commercial keyers.

Is there a history of electronic keyers somewhere?  If someone has the information I'm willing to put it on my website.

Richard AA4OO
http://hamradioqrp.com
Logged

Lower your Power and Raise your expectations
KE6EE
Member

Posts: 1842




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2017, 12:04:16 PM »

I wonder when iambic modes appeared in commercial keyers.

I would like to know who the "genius" was who first sold the idea of iambic keying.  Huh

I think the net effect of iambic keying on CW operating might well be explored. Useful or only additionally confounding
or completely and utterly unnecessary?

I separate the utility of iambic paddles from this--I like the feel of a double lever setup even when iambic keying
is not used. I have an iambic paddle which I enjoy using with a keyer in "bug mode." I have a bug with dual levers which I find to be a superior instrument.
Logged
N4OI
Member

Posts: 351




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2017, 03:59:56 AM »

[[...] I would like to know who the "genius" was who first sold the idea of iambic keying.  Huh [...]

I would buy that person a beer and thank him every time I send "CQ" with that efficiently elegant iambic finger motion!

73   Roll Eyes
Logged
KE6EE
Member

Posts: 1842




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2017, 09:43:13 AM »

I send "CQ" with that efficiently elegant iambic finger motion!

I get it!

I almost never call CQ and if, for whatever odd reason I decide occasionally to do it, never have to send
more than one or two!  Grin

My antennas are good enough that iambic keying is totally unnecessary!  Cheesy
Logged
N3QE
Member

Posts: 4875




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2017, 12:49:45 PM »

I can find references in July 1967 to the "W0EPV Squeeze Keyer" indicating that the squeeze concept dates back to 1966. That article includes text saying:

"This new electronic keyer is different - so different, in fact, that it may change the whole concept of keying code ... The outstanding feature of the W0EPV keyer is its 'single-dot memory and injection' system."

The picture in the article shows a two-paddle keying instrument and doesn't make any particular remarks about the rarity of a two-paddle instrument. I know that hams were making keyers built out of two surplus J-38's strapped bottom to bottom, at least as far back as the 1950's, but as far as I can tell before W0EPV they were not squeeze keyers.
Logged
KE6EE
Member

Posts: 1842




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: October 23, 2017, 04:48:50 PM »

I can find references in July 1967 to the "W0EPV Squeeze Keyer" indicating that the squeeze concept dates back to 1966.

I know that hams were making keyers built out of two surplus J-38's strapped bottom to bottom, at least as far back as the 1950's, but as far as I can tell before W0EPV they were not squeeze keyers.

So the "iambic" paddle preceeded the "iambic" keyer!

That may suggest something about how technology develops. It goes in all sorts of directions, not necessarily productive ones.

Now I'm wondering about the future of keyers once I perfect my Quadra Paddle: left, right, up and down have fully separate
functions.  Grin Grin
Logged
HB9FXW
Member

Posts: 52




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2017, 02:18:37 AM »


Now I'm wondering about the future of keyers once I perfect my Quadra Paddle: left, right, up and down have fully separate
functions.  Grin Grin

Interesting! Would you be able to squeeze them? I guess the up and down will produce di-dah and da-dit strings, so a "C" could be sent by simply maintaining the down (or up) paddle, but what would then a left-right squeeze produce? Hmmm... You could maybe program it to produce dididadah or dadadidit strings, for easier commas and question marks. And left-up for easier "F" or "L" and so on.

With four independent levers you could also pinch more than two paddles at the same time so you could find uses for three different 3-paddles squeezes and a 4-paddles one. Maybe speed control?
Logged

Seiuchy, free morse QSO quiz and simulator
KE6EE
Member

Posts: 1842




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2017, 08:05:46 AM »

With four independent levers you could also pinch more than two paddles at the same time so you could find uses for three different 3-paddles squeezes and a 4-paddles one. Maybe speed control?

The four-paddle squeeze is really interesting! Lots of potential. Programmable functions so that memories can be selected while sending. Speed control on the fly so that character speed can be varied within words for emphasis.

With the four-paddle squeeze and appropriate keyer you are approaching the expressiveness of the bug!
Logged
AC7CW
Member

Posts: 962




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2017, 02:21:31 PM »

Now I'm wondering about the future of keyers once I perfect my Quadra Paddle: left, right, up and down have fully separate
functions.  Grin Grin
[/quote]

Heck yes, you could send PSK31 with that
Logged

Novice 1958, 20WPM Extra now... (and get off my lawn)
K3TN
Member

Posts: 558


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #10 on: October 25, 2017, 02:52:13 AM »

Ed Goss N3CW has a great book out - "Compendium of Automiatic Morse Code" You can find info on it here, if interested you can buy it online from many places like Amazon.

The book gives you the history of just about everything to do with any kind of keyer and paddle, with pictures of everything.

73 John K3TN
Logged

John K3TN
VK5EEE
Member

Posts: 1041




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: October 25, 2017, 05:50:33 AM »

The simple hacksaw blade, knife, or nail file etc, the very easiest key to make with basic bits, is also the most versatile: immediate speed change, any spacings, emphasis, style, etc, it's called the side swiper or cootie. It still produces the best CW when used by an experienced hand at side swiping. It has only ONE lever and two contacts left and right, which both do nothing other than make contact. It's not hard to learn to use, and if by far the most versatile of ALL the much more complex keys from straight key, through bug to electronic keyer.

It's really humbling to note that the simplest mode -- Morse Code -- is still the most efficient (all things considered) and that the simplest key (cootie) that costs next to nothing to make is the best key. Yes, I still love to use staight key, bug, electronic keyer, and if I had a working device I'd even use a keyboard to send 70WPM CW, so no need to throw out what you like using, but simple really is best in CW.

BUT do I love my beautiful OzBug, the old Simplex Auto bug, and the easy perfect tempo of the keyer, and the neat QRS or sloppy care free "spark" fist of the straight key. Yet, it's surprising more people are not using cooties, given their simple overall superiority.
Logged

Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever

Support CW and join CW clubs. QTT: FIST#1124, HSC#1437, UFT#728, RCWC#982, SKCC#15007, CWOPS#1714, 30CW#1,
K5LXP
Member

Posts: 5293


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #12 on: October 28, 2017, 09:43:24 AM »

Ed Goss N3CW has a great book out - "Compendium of Automiatic Morse Code"

I've had my copy of the book about a month now, this is an awesome reference.  The amount of detail, research and effort that went into this book must be seen to be appreciated.  Hundreds of high quality images of items you wouldn't find in a lifetime of hamfest scrounging.  Pages of supporting text and history on topics you didn't even know happened.  I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys CW and the machinery that helps us send it.

To answer my own question, it seems the cart came before the horse.  Keyers that sent automated dots and dashes preceeded human interface hardware to actuate it.  So the "old" paddle that I have from the '60's actually was created so operators didn't have to homebrew a paddle to work with the variety of commercial and homebrew keyer designs of the day.   Of course it took solid state designs to implement dot dash memories and contact debouncing, and create readily duplicated affordable production equipment that the creators of my paddle probably anticipated it would be used with.  Makes you wonder what the evolution of the art will bring to CW generation in years to come.

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
 
Logged
KE6EE
Member

Posts: 1842




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: October 29, 2017, 10:11:58 AM »

I've had my copy of the book about a month now, this is an awesome reference.

To answer my own question, it seems the cart came before the horse.  Keyers that sent automated dots and dashes preceeded human interface hardware to actuate it.  

Thanks for repeating the reference to that book, Mark--it looks like something well worth reading.

And your post stimulated my memory to recall that I learned code back in 1957 using an automated device, an Instructograph which used perforated paper tape (which had long slits and short slits) for carrying the software. It was spring-wound like many of the old 78 rpm record players which were still used back then and it had an adjustable speed control.

I borrowed the Instructograph from a mentor who was a ham and a business partner of my dad's.

I remember lying on the floor of my parents' living room listening to the Instructograph and sucking up the code at maybe 5 wpm. Maybe slower. No instant method with characters at 20 wpm to insure that I could not count dits and dahs. I sucked up the code in a week or two during summer vacation. I am quite sure my code learning did not take up a lot of time so as to get in the way of my usual 13-year-old mischief with my chums down the block.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2017, 10:15:25 AM by KE6EE » Logged
AA4OO
Member

Posts: 96


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #14 on: October 30, 2017, 06:24:06 PM »

There's a very informative article written by Karl, DJ5IL about history of keyers at...  http://www.cq-cq.eu/dj5il_rt007.pdf

Richard, AA4OO
http://hamradioqrp.com
Logged

Lower your Power and Raise your expectations
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!