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Author Topic: Dead (quiet) South Florida Repeaters?  (Read 29674 times)
NC5P
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Posts: 29




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« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2017, 06:43:30 PM »

Standalone repeaters are for the most part dead these days.  That goes for digital ones even more than analog.  The busy ones are connected to a network like echolink, DMR-MARC, Wires-X, P25NX, Brandmeister, etc.  Even the smaller linked analog systems don't have the traffic they did in earlier times. 
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ONAIR
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« Reply #16 on: February 13, 2017, 09:54:50 AM »

Standalone repeaters are for the most part dead these days.  That goes for digital ones even more than analog.  The busy ones are connected to a network like echolink, DMR-MARC, Wires-X, P25NX, Brandmeister, etc.  Even the smaller linked analog systems don't have the traffic they did in earlier times. 
  True!  And the sad part is that many people are just monitoring those repeaters and not even talking!  So many hams have all the local repeaters programmed into their radios, and continuously scan those frequencies whenever their radios are turned on.  Often when they don't know who you are, they won't respond!  That's why (as I said in an earlier post) my experiment indicated that it is so much more effective for hams to be proactive and ask for a radio check, than to just indicate that they are "listening". 
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K6AER
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« Reply #17 on: May 08, 2017, 05:53:21 PM »

I had three large coverage repeaters in Colorado. I left them there when I left the state. Although they covered over 200,000 square miles and three states no one was using them any more. This is the case for all the repeater owners I know. The same is what I found in South East Michigan.

Repeaters are dying a slow death. Boredom, cell phones and lack of coverage has set the cancer. I have three complete commercial repeaters in the garage. They are worth nothing. Only folks still using VHF are boaters.
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KB9ZB
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Posts: 111




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« Reply #18 on: May 19, 2017, 01:41:47 PM »

While I can’t speak for other areas, one common thread seems to be emerging. Keep repeaters quite except for nets and emergencies.  I do NOT subscribe to that mode of operations many clubs quell any long term repeater use. At one point there used to be responding stations that would always be around and help those in need. They would also keep the repeater active throughout the day, if anyone traveling in or around the foot print would hear activity and jump in for information. Clubs seem to frown on that, so you end up with dead repeaters.
The other issue is we just have way too many, we have user devolution, instead of the masses on one or two repeaters they are all spread out on 20 or more especially in the larger metro areas. It seems like in many ways we are our own worst enemy when it comes to repeaters. There are in fact “phantom” repeaters on the air, the owners want it to be kept quiet and lurk in the background. Seems to me the more activity the better it would be for everyone.
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AC8ND
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Posts: 25




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« Reply #19 on: May 27, 2017, 07:34:23 AM »

Got all excited on my drive home from work the other day.
Scanning the multitude of silent repeaters and 52.
Got a CQ on 52 and I tried to answer.
Could hear that the heard me but partial call sign only.

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N8YX
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Posts: 968




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« Reply #20 on: May 31, 2017, 03:05:49 PM »

A lot of the repeater owners are to blame for the demise of their systems. Open the darned thing up for any LEGAL use (rather than closing it off to you and a handful of your buddies) and the users will come pouring in.

The majority of us who became fed up with such antics and still wanted the ability to work VHF/UHF effectively built high-performance FM simplex and weak-signal-optimized stations, while others set up digital networks.

There's a decent amount of FM simplex and SSB activity on VHF in my area but with the exception of some scheduled nets on the club-sponsored machines, most repeater pairs are dead.
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N1GMV
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Posts: 169




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« Reply #21 on: June 04, 2017, 04:28:21 AM »

Repeaters is a strange phenomena, this also happens on DMR, but it seem a repeater can be quiet for days but the minute I start to have a conversation there will be several people who suddenly have the need to interrupt and sometimes even take over the repeater. I guess what they have to say is of an urgent nature.

 Roll Eyes
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K0UA
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Posts: 1362




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« Reply #22 on: September 25, 2017, 08:00:50 AM »

Yes, repeaters are dead.  We killed them by overpopulation.  A repeater for each ham in the area, so that he would never have to talk to anyone else.
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N5LB
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Posts: 34




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« Reply #23 on: October 17, 2017, 08:31:59 PM »

Same near central MN.  Just bought a new ht, not sure why.  Been scanning and calling for a couple weeks.  It appears to be dead air. 

And yes, the ht is working.

Oh well...
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KG4NEL
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Posts: 504




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« Reply #24 on: October 18, 2017, 07:04:43 AM »

Yes, repeaters are dead.  We killed them by overpopulation.  A repeater for each ham in the area, so that he would never have to talk to anyone else.

Basically my thoughts on closed machines. Although, I guess they may have been a thing at one point, like autopatches.
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NA4IT
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Posts: 42


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« Reply #25 on: October 20, 2017, 03:51:56 AM »

I find there is more activity on simplex frequencies than repeaters.
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KG4NEL
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Posts: 504




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« Reply #26 on: October 20, 2017, 07:13:33 AM »

I find there is more activity on simplex frequencies than repeaters.

It permits a lot more of a "natural" conversation, that's for sure. The bloviate-for-two-minutes-and-beep format of repeaters tends to stifle a lively roundtable.
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ONAIR
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Posts: 3525




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« Reply #27 on: October 21, 2017, 05:39:40 PM »

Here is ONE repeater that has been almost constantly active for many years, although it sounds a lot more like CB than ham radio!!  www.BroadCastify.com/listen/feed/14747/web   Roll Eyes
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K0UA
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Posts: 1362




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« Reply #28 on: October 22, 2017, 07:59:40 AM »

Here is ONE repeater that has been almost constantly active for many years, although it sounds a lot more like CB than ham radio!!  www.BroadCastify.com/listen/feed/14747/web   Roll Eyes

Um... no, most CB operators are quite a bit more polite than the traffic on this vile machine.
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KB2FCV
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« Reply #29 on: October 25, 2017, 08:35:54 AM »

There are several reasons repeaters are quiet:

1) Techs get their license and get on repeaters only. After a week or two of talking to the same people over and over, they get bored.

2) Repeaters are going dark... a lot of high level repeaters are going by the wayside because owners and clubs can't afford tower lease fees.

3) Little use of repeaters... generally the most use will be at morning and evening drive time, and net time.


There is a lot more to a tech license. Currently Techs get everything there is on 6M and above. There is digital, packet, APRS, SSB, DX, simplex, etc. Don't rely just on repeaters. Get up a good homemade antenna and try something.

Techs get CW on about every HF band, but they also get voice on 10M (28.300 - 28.500). When 10M is open, it can be loads of fun. I used to run a 10M mobile on a power supply into a rotatable dipole and worked tons of DX when I was a Tech.

If you save up, you can get something like a Yaesu FT-857D that is all mode all bands and work some of the other stuff mentioned above, and listen to the other bands on HF and do some SWL. That will encourage you to go higher and get the General and Extra.

And one important thing that almost no one does... as soon as you pass the Tech exam, start studying for the General. When you pass it, start on the Extra.

This post nailed it. There are so many interesting and cool things you can do with the Tech license that most people don't realize. 6m... meteor scatter.. satellites... Earth-Moon-Earth... digital... DX. There is so much more to Tech privileges than just repeaters. Check it out!
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