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Author Topic: The "Good Ol Boy Network" on ham radio  (Read 13191 times)
FORMER_K2OOL
Member

Posts: 13




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« on: January 20, 2017, 08:40:24 PM »

Read this with a clear mind or dont read it:
I've been licensed since the 1990s,have been interested in electronics all my life,became a technician and got a job
doing electronics out of school.For years I have been toting around a Handie talkie.My first one was a Kenwood Th-21AT
the 2 meter Kenwood with the thumbwheel.In the beginning I didn't do much talking and tried to listen and learn when to
talk,when not to,when to ID my station and so on.Back in the 90s the excuse was "we don't like them no code techs".
Feeling unwelcome on 2 meters and having people look my old callsign up in an outdated book the ARRL used to put out
kept me from talking,so I just used to listen.My friend and I used to chat on simplex late at night and have fun just
talking about life and such.His neighbor about 5 blocks down used to come on and scold us for splashing him and we were
only doing 5 watts in 1 town.Ok so he was a grouch.I couldnt fix that and neither could my friend.
After getting out of school him and I got back on the air and started to hang again on repeaters and simplex.
No problems really.Just the good old boys network every once and awhile giving us "you didn't ID or this or that" or stupid no coders talk.Yes I don't claim to know it all,I do have a right to get on the air with an FCC license.
The problem with this mentality is if you chase everyone away,they will take over the bands and sell them off to the
highest bidder.You get it yet?If not start at the top and reread this post.
I have been seeing more and more people that if they don't like what you say they complain (i wanted to say the B word)
tell you to go back to CB,leave a repeater,you get on simplex its the same "good old boys network".
Well guys out there in radioland.....Newsflash the Good old boys network is dying off and the radio is becoming more and more
dead by the day.Meaning less QSOs,more digital noise and more complainers.Heres a thought,if you dont like what you hear
on a certain frequency,turn the knob to another.But dont start complaining all over to another person.Some people actually like the hobby and want it to grow and become bigger and not DIE.Instead of being a chowderhead,why dont you try welcoming
someone to the hobby or try and talk to people.Get on the bands,use em or you will lose them!
And to all you like to cause intentional interference,the FCC is stepping up their game,increasing fees for this kind of thing.
So if you think this is stupid or don't respect a ham or someone who doesn't have a bigger license or a smaller one than you,then honestly you don't like the hobby,sell your radio and buy skis or something.

Signed a concerned citezen of the ham radio community.
Logged
KB4XV
Member

Posts: 0




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« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2017, 06:04:28 AM »

I have been a ham for over 35 years and and was interested in it for 20 years before that. I think everyone should be welcomed into the hobby. It is not your fault the FCC changed the rules. There will always be grouchy old farts that resent other people because they had an easier path into the hobby. But we have to have new people or the hobby will die. Hang in there. There are more good than bad.
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K2OWK
Member

Posts: 1273




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« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2017, 05:18:47 PM »

Hello K2OOL, I like your call, you will see why at the end. I have been a licensed ham for more then 60 years. I have never had a problem with fellow hams. I was always welcome. I am now a member of a local club, most of us are pretty old, but we welcome new hams and new members. In fact we go out of our way to recruit new hams. I am a volunteer Examiner and try to get as many new people interested in Ham Radio. I do Know code and use it once in a while to keep in practice, but I prefer to talk to someone on voice. It seams more personal that way. Our club owns a local repeater and anyone is welcome to use it, as long as good ham practice is used.

I have read of some goofballs on certain 80 and 40 meter frequencies, but I think there days are numbered because of the FCC. (they like all the money they can get from the fines). I also know there are some CB operators using our bands without authorization or licenses. There days are also numbered. Remember all licensed hams should report all abuses of the bands to the FCC. We are supposed to police our frequencies for none authorized use and report it.

73s

K2OWK (same regional call as you, but no longer in my original call designation) I started out as a Novice KN2OWK   
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WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 21754




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« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2017, 05:24:24 PM »

IMO, K2OOL's experience is pretty weird.

I'm in a big city here (Los Angeles) and 2m lacks for activity compared with 20-30-40 years ago; we have 150 wide-coverage repeaters on mountaintops that cover tens of thousands of square miles with almost nobody using them most of the time.

If ANYONE ever came on 2m FM to tell me I was doing anything wrong, I'd look him up, visit him, and invite him into the street for a chat.   That hasn't happened yet and I've been here over 28 years.   I don't hear what K2OOL described on 2m, ever.
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K1ZJH
Member

Posts: 3328




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« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2017, 05:28:00 PM »

Oh, this is nothing new...  don't imagine that it is.

I remember an old coot back in the sixties hearing a W2 who was known for saying "no kids, no lids, no space cadets..." when calling CQ.

I remember one local who always told new comers that he refused to talk to WA1 or WB1 Johnny Come -lately hams.  Just ignore them and move on. You are probably better off not associating with them.

Pete
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SWMAN
Member

Posts: 1087




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« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2017, 08:48:59 PM »

 I like all of your pictures on your lookup.  Just hang in there, it will get better.
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SWMAN
Member

Posts: 1087




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« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2017, 07:34:22 AM »

 I forgot to mention, when that happens to me I just tell them to mind their own business, that usually works.
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ONAIR
Member

Posts: 3536




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« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2017, 10:34:33 AM »

I forgot to mention, when that happens to me I just tell them to mind their own business, that usually works.
  Yep!  I just tell them to tale a long walk off a short antenna!
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NC5P
Member

Posts: 29




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« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2017, 05:43:07 PM »

You are hanging out the wrong places.  I find some repeaters are not places I would enjoy hanging out so I don't.  Those kinds of people you are referring to do have their places, even some on simplex frequencies.  Not different than some bars that don't really welcome new people.  You leave them be and find someplace else.  There is plenty of activity on D-Star, DMR, Fusion/Wires-X, or give Satellite a try.  You can talk the world through a repeater these days with just an HT.  I have also found people are more receptive on the lesser used modes and bands.  Try 6m, 220, or 900 MHz.  I get on P25, not many people there but they are very nice.  We are here to have fun and make new friends.  I really like 220 here, there is a fantastic group on there and they remember my name and call, even ask about my motorcycle. 
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KM3F
Member

Posts: 794




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« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2017, 12:07:39 PM »

K2OOL,
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KM3F
Member

Posts: 794




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« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2017, 12:44:43 PM »

Posting time out occurred in previous post attempt..
Your experiences are/were the results of the type people in you area.
These same types move to my area to the north, inhabit one repeater and generate the same issues as where they came from. 
It's not that way everywhere.
For the most part hams in my area will not have anything to do with them.
There is a lot that can be said but better to let it alone because nothing can be done about it.
I think what I did say  is enough to get the basic message across.
Good luck.
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ONAIR
Member

Posts: 3536




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« Reply #11 on: January 27, 2017, 12:53:55 PM »

You are hanging out the wrong places.  I find some repeaters are not places I would enjoy hanging out so I don't.  Those kinds of people you are referring to do have their places, even some on simplex frequencies.  Not different than some bars that don't really welcome new people.  You leave them be and find someplace else.  There is plenty of activity on D-Star, DMR, Fusion/Wires-X, or give Satellite a try.  You can talk the world through a repeater these days with just an HT.  I have also found people are more receptive on the lesser used modes and bands.  Try 6m, 220, or 900 MHz.  I get on P25, not many people there but they are very nice.  We are here to have fun and make new friends.  I really like 220 here, there is a fantastic group on there and they remember my name and call, even ask about my motorcycle.  
  Good point!  Also let's not leave out Echolink, where there is literally a "world" of repeaters with loads of hams willing to have QSOs!
« Last Edit: January 27, 2017, 12:58:03 PM by ONAIR » Logged
AF5CC
Member

Posts: 225




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« Reply #12 on: January 27, 2017, 01:39:43 PM »

I am with WB2WIK, I have never heard these things happen on the air.  Guess I hang around on the wrong bands or something.
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N0NB
Member

Posts: 143


WWW

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« Reply #13 on: January 30, 2017, 10:32:37 AM »

K2OOL, your experience on the simplex frequency is quite bizarre and certainly not common in my experience.

OTOH, your entire post could be construed as "everyone is out to get me", though I'm going to assume that was not your intent.

I'm not going to say that there aren't some clods who hold an amateur radio license as there are too many.  When I read posts like these I must conclude, based on my experience, that there are differing worlds of amateur radio out there.
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73, de Nate
Bremen, KS

SKCC 6225
VR2AX
Member

Posts: 804




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« Reply #14 on: February 02, 2017, 03:27:25 AM »

Is there any monitoring of frequency coverage in US ham bands, like CCTV? Should detect any divergence?
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