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Author Topic: Marine freqs?  (Read 2326 times)
N4NYY
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Posts: 4941




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« on: January 31, 2017, 11:48:54 AM »

Of these freqs: http://www.csgnetwork.com/marinefreqtable.html

Which are the most commonly used? I would like to monitor them with my Boafeng HT. I live right near the bottom Delaware River where it empties in Delaware Bay. I have never monitored Marine bands before.
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K4JJL
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Posts: 797




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« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2017, 01:07:47 PM »

16 is always for emergencies.  Bridges usually follow one channel, but it varies locally.  Fisherman also usually stick to one channel, but that, too, varies locally.
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WA8ZTZ
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Posts: 240




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« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2017, 01:46:45 PM »

Do a search "delaware river marine frequencies" and you will find all kinds of info.
Channel 16 (156.800) is the International safety and calling freq,  ships are generally required to maintain a watch on this freq.  USCG Navigation Center is another good source of info.  Marine traffic is quiet this time of year here on the Great Lakes but you are in a good location near the river and canal...  should hear all kinds of good stuff, have fun.   Smiley 
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N4NYY
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« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2017, 01:51:43 PM »

I am assuming no fisherman (This time of year anyway). I was looking to listen to commercial vessels. There are a crap load of them when I go over the bridge.
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KB3QWC
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Posts: 12




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« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2017, 05:25:42 PM »

Try channel 13 156.650 mhz for navigational information from commercial vessels.

Channel 22A 157.100 mhz will be the USCG

The Dealware Pilots would use a commercial VHf Marine channel.   Look them up online to see  what is in use.  Chirp has the ability to download Marine frequencies into the radio and you might be surprised what you're hear with them all scanned.

There may be commercial fishing, since they operate almost year round for different species.
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K3LRH
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Posts: 85




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« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2017, 05:49:36 PM »

...The Delaware River Pilot station in Cape Henlopen uses ch 14 as their working frequency.  CG ch16 and 22A are commonly used along with ch 13.  Channels 68,69,70,71 and 72 are used by the fishing boats. add WX1 too if you can for the weather station in Lewes DE.  If you use scan mode, you might want to set your rig to "skip" wx1, otherwise it the scan will always stop on WX1, which transmits continually.
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K5LXP
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« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2017, 06:38:13 PM »


Enter them all.  Press SCAN.

You'd be amazed how active those frequencies can be, even hundreds of miles away from any body of water.

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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