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Author Topic: Radio over IP software for hams - IRN Server  (Read 3741 times)
M6IGJ
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Posts: 4




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« on: May 18, 2017, 08:03:46 AM »

Hi all, just sharing a link to a system that's free for hams (and those looking at doing their ticket) that's available on a PC, Linux and Apple Macs. It also works on mobile devices (iOs and Android), but there is a one off charge to buy the app on mobile devices sadly (it's about $2 on the Google Store).

It's a system known as the IRN Server (International Radio Network) . It runs on a private server that uses the Teamspeak 3 application.

It's set up by hams, for hams and takes around 3 minutes to set up. Unlike some computer based simulation apps, it actually links into real RF hubs and repeaters around the world and allows full RX and TX for licensed hams.

Its not designed to replace real RF to RF connections, but not everyone in the World has the ability to use nice antennas and repeater systems, and as such, this was originally set up to help users talk to the World wherever they are (although anyone can use it). The delay is minimal and the audio is by far clearer than any other VoIP/Roip system out there.

The system does allow non-hams  (those wanting/waiting to do their test) on to certain talk groups also, however the inbuilt security settings do not allow non-hams (or unverified users) to TX in any of the RF connected channels. It does however give them the to opportunity to listen to what us real hams talk about (usually the weather etc. lol), thus giving them experience prior to getting their licence. There are some mixed talk groups (channels) that both hams and non-hams can both speak on and one group that uses it even does live training etc for the newbies.

Additionally, if any repeater keepers are looking at ways to crossinks their repeaters into internet gateways, the TS3 application has lots of options... And it's free... lol.

If anyone is interested, please feel free to look up the website to find out more (or find us on Facebook ).

Please feel free to ask any questions you may have.

73's for now.

Gareth - M6IGJ

www.internationalradionetwork.net
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W2BLC
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Posts: 0




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« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2017, 06:49:52 AM »

I do not understand the need for more "Internet radio" when CQ100 already exists and is super easy to install and use.

I have been using CQ100 for many years and have yet to see anything that even comes close to its performance.

Info at: http://www.qsonet.com/index.html 

It is the most fun for the dollar in ham radio. Perfect for the ham without outside antennas for HF.
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M6IGJ
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2017, 10:31:15 AM »

Hi Bill.

I can think of a few reasons why there is a need for something like the IRN Server...

Firstly, it is my understanding that QSONET is a simulation based application that only works on certain versions of Windows. Even then it list several issues with compatibility problems with the newer versions. TS3 works on Linux, Windows, Apple Mac, Android, Pi's, iOs, tablets and ipads etc. Having tried to install CQ100 a few years ago, I actually gave up due to compatibility issues with Windows and my antivirus. :-(

The IRN Server connects to actual RF repeaters and hubs etc thus allowing you to speak to other hams around the world using anything from DMR, D-Star, Fusion, Allstar and bog standard analogue RF etc. Whilst there are some virtual channels, these are in conjunction with crosslinked channels and nothing is simulated. It is free and there is no ongoing charge or subscription as with some of these "virtual" systems. It is crosslinked primarily with 2/70 systems and not HF though.

The performance of the TS3 application uses audio codecs far superior to to just about anything else. By all means try it to see the difference.

The closest thing to it is probably Echolink, which whilst it is great, they officially only allow users to connect to other echolink stations. Personally, I find it a little dated and the delays that can be caused occasionally very frustrating when trying to get into a QSO that's ongoing.

I have no issues with other systems and enjoy using RF as a first choice where I can, but if I can't then using a system that actually connects to RF is my second choice.

I'm sure QSONET has it's uses for some people, but the system is very different to the IRN server both in function, it's ongoing cost and it's application compatibility.

Equally, there is always room for new systems. The whole ethos of amateur radio as a hobby is to progress, play, experiment and communicate. I find any system that is part of that is a good thing, and whilst some modes of operation might not be for everyone, it's bring choices to the table for users that might want some extra "tools in the box" to play with. ;-)

Yours,

Gareth
M6IGJ/KJ4VNF

http://www.internationalradionetwork.net





I do not understand the need for more "Internet radio" when CQ100 already exists and is super easy to install and use.

I have been using CQ100 for many years and have yet to see anything that even comes close to its performance.

Info at: http://www.qsonet.com/index.html 

It is the most fun for the dollar in ham radio. Perfect for the ham without outside antennas for HF.
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KG4RUL
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Posts: 3110


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« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2017, 01:22:20 PM »

Following the instructions in the PDF - I get a failed to connect message. 

FWIW - the screens shown in the instructions do not match the actual screens
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M6IGJ
Member

Posts: 4




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« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2017, 03:56:12 PM »

Hi Dennis. What device are you using, and at what point does it tell you that it "failed to connect" ? If you have any screenshots, that might be useful, but I'll do my best to help you.

Yours,

Gareth

Following the instructions in the PDF - I get a failed to connect message. 

FWIW - the screens shown in the instructions do not match the actual screens
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KB9RRN
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Posts: 1


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« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2018, 07:35:07 AM »

So, how are people actually interfacing the TeamSpeak application to, say, a repeater?

I've been looking for documentation (writeup or pics )from someone who has actually done this, but so far I've been unable to find it.

I have heard "Zoiper".  How is it done?  Where do you get the PTT and CAS logic?  What interface are you using?
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M6IGJ
Member

Posts: 4




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« Reply #6 on: January 06, 2018, 12:53:49 PM »

There are different ways. Zoiper is probably the most common way to interface it using something like Allstar running on a raspberry pi. Using virtual audio cables you can take the 2 audio feeds and work it on vox using the IAX settings with asterisk.

I'm actually working on some written how to guides but as yet they are still on my to do list... But watch this space... Lol.
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