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Author Topic: why grid squ on 6?  (Read 1953 times)
KB2WVO
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Posts: 382




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« on: June 13, 2017, 01:04:36 PM »

ive wondered this why on 6 we use grid squs and not on other in the CQ or the QSO ??
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KM3F
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Posts: 792




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« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2017, 11:09:50 PM »

Six meters and higher is called VHF and on up to SHF.
Except for ES opening on 6m providing skip communications, most is Tropo over land using high gain beams.
Grid squares make it easy to locate the area inside  each square for  each station by map.
The 4 character Grip square is used to point high gain beams above 70 cm when each station is trying to meet for distance, record and contesting.
The squares also offer a reason to go hunting for as many squares as possible as part of the hobby over the long term.
I'm sure others will offer additional comment.
Good luck.

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WA8UEG
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Posts: 743




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« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2017, 04:57:06 AM »

Maidenhead Locator System (named after the town outside London where it was first conceived by a meeting of European VHF managers in 1980). It was designed to determine any station in the world location with an easy quick system.

Confirming grid squares has become a popular award on the VHF bands.

My logging program is integrated with my rotor and uses the 5 digit grid square to automatically rotate my antennas (HF & VHF) when a call is inputted so there is no guess work and is quick and easy.

A grid square measures 1° latitude by 2° longitude and measures approximately 70 × 100. A grid square is indicated by two letters (the field) and two numbers (the square), FN21, is my grid square.

Each sub square is designated by the addition of two letters after the grid square, mine is FN21ib. These more precise locators   measure 2.5 minutes latitude by 5 minutes longitude, roughly corresponding to 3 × 4 miles.
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G8YMW
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« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2017, 05:28:27 AM »

I would ask the reverse question, why do they not use locator squares on HF?
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73 de Tony
Windows 10:  Making me profane since March 2017
WA8UEG
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Posts: 743




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« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2017, 06:14:34 AM »

We do, at least I do to get accurate beam headings on both HF & VHF. Before I installed the auto rotate function on my rotor control box I used the grid square locator on my log program to aim the beam although it's more critical on VHF as KM3F said a lot of VHF antennas have a very narrow pattern .

The Wireless Institute of Australia has a HF award for grid squares, not sure if there are others.
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KB1GMX
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Posts: 1505




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« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2017, 10:24:40 AM »

Like everyone said.  It makes pointing an antenna easier as you know from the grid given where they are relative to you with out knowing where sansoggy swamp is.

When you get to 15 element or more yogis the beam width is down under 20 degrees or less.  The miss factor can be as little as 10 degrees for a hear/not hear case.  That makes accurate aim required.   At higher UHF or 10ghz beamwidths are under 1-2 degrees.

It also helps on 10M where 3 element beam is pointy enough to make it useful.


Allison
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AA4PB
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« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2017, 11:36:07 AM »

If you want a quick way to locate a grid square, try http://qthlocator.free.fr/index.php
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Bob  AA4PB
Garrisonville, VA
WA2CWA
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Posts: 484


WWW

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« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2017, 07:54:54 PM »

On VHF, the grid square system tends to be less useful for beam headings when working aurora, meteor scatter, back scatter, and even sporadic E at times especially when more then one propagation anomaly is in play.

Pete, wa2cwa
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WW7KE
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Posts: 603




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« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2017, 08:15:37 PM »

I would ask the reverse question, why do they not use locator squares on HF?

On JT65, grid squares are the first part of the exchange, including the CQ.
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He speaks fluent PSK31...  One QSO with him earns you 5BDXCC...  His Wouff Hong has two Wouffs... Hiram Percy Maxim called HIM "The Old Man..."  He is... The Most Interesting Ham In The World!
ND6M
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Posts: 568




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« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2017, 04:48:32 AM »

I would ask the reverse question, why do they not use locator squares on HF?

On JT65, grid squares are the first part of the exchange, including the CQ.

The original JT 65 protocol exchange was written for VHF EME operations
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W1VT
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Posts: 2520




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« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2017, 08:26:42 AM »

The use of the grid locator makes it easy to identify stations that are actually in Hawaii and Alaska.

Zack W1VT
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