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Author Topic: Receiver antenna suggestion for 2200 and 630  (Read 6060 times)
N4AEQ
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Posts: 100




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« on: July 18, 2017, 09:33:05 AM »

 Got my ELF-MF up converter in today, works good on AM when used with my & 106m dipole or 80m inverted vee.  Wont know till night time how well is does on 630 or 2200.  I do need a better antenna or antennas, already have the feed lines run from the shack to outside & terminated, just trying to determine the best antenna for either 2200 or 630 bands.  I have the area to run a end feed longwire or maybe make a loop,  what do you think?

 I will be staying with receive only until I get the receiver and antenna setup working properly and when the weather cools maybe go for rx/tx.
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HAMFESTS
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Posts: 63




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« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2017, 11:32:12 AM »

With a receive only antenna you have a lot of choices.

An active antenna, a vertical antenna, or a loop. You may want to experiment with all three to see what works in your location the best.

Use Google to what what others have built and used.

I used to use a dipole but that didn't work well because at that wavelength a dipole is almost like laying the antenna on the ground. I found that a vertical worked much better with ground wire radials.  I want to try an active antenna and a loop sometime.

Amrad had a nice article on an active antenna for the low bands and you don't have to buy the expensive FET, you can use a cheaper FET, just reduce the current draw for the FET. The link for the article is in the text.

http://www.amrad.org/lfmf-active-antennas/


Or Google PA0RDT mini-whip

http://www.qsl.net/f8vol/miniwhip.html

http://s52as.osiria.net/home/my-mini-whip-antenna

If you want to try a loop....Google LF loop antenna.

Search by images and you'll see lots of interesting antennas.

Good luck!
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WA4JNX
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Posts: 13




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« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2017, 11:24:41 AM »

Please see the "rtc" replies on this forum for info about
making a hula hoop longwave loop:

http://www.matthewsworkbench.com/my-disappointing-longwave-dxing/

Results here were very successful.

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KM1H
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Posts: 2482




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« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2017, 05:43:16 PM »

I use 5 two wire 500 and 750' Beverages for 10 directions that work very well if you have the room. They also show directivity all the way down to the LF Broadcast Band and the few 2200 beacons Ive heard where they are no longer true Beverages but just short longwires.

A two turn 40" diameter balanced loop made from 1" CATV hardline that is remotely tuned and rotated has been used on the BCB and 160 for decades. I havent got around to getting it down to 630 since it is varactor tuned into a PP U-310 preamp. Another varactor in parallel with the BC radio 3 should do it.

Carl
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K0OD
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Posts: 2954




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« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2017, 09:39:04 PM »

I sure wouldn't expect much down there in July.
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K0OD
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Posts: 2954




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« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2017, 07:06:29 PM »

I sure wouldn't expect much down there in July.

For testing it, try the digital signals of WWVB on 60 kHz and those megawatt military transmitters around 25 kHz. Higher up in frequency you should be able to pick up the CW IDs of a few local NDBs even in July.

BTW, I don't understand listeners who say they never hear anything on longwave. My mother in law had a cheapie 40-year old portable that really pulled in NDBs even with its built in whip. That was during winter of course, and years ago when NDBs were more common.   
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KM1H
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Posts: 2482




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« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2017, 11:48:47 AM »

With just 200' of wire on the ground and a 1935 radio I can find NDB's 24/7 except during T storms Shocked
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K0OD
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Posts: 2954




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« Reply #7 on: July 22, 2017, 08:32:27 PM »

Good point. Don't know specifically about summertime but I can usually copy NDBs up to about 150 miles during the day. Most NDB's use about 25-50 watts and short vertical antennas. A few run a KW or more and can easily be heard 1,000 miles in winter. NDB transmissions are modulated using several different methods. Their code isn't CW.

Two years ago I spent a few nighttime sessions logging NDBs. I ID'd about 60 of them including several in Canada. Best distance was about 1800 miles from my location in Saint Louis.     
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 3256




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« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2017, 11:45:47 AM »


BTW, I don't understand listeners who say they never hear anything on longwave.
Try operating from an urban/suburban area.  The noise level rules all.
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 3256




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« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2017, 11:48:33 AM »

Most NDB's use about 25-50 watts and short vertical antennas.... NDB transmissions are modulated using several different methods. Their code isn't CW.  
Most NDB's use "Tee" antennas of rather low height, around 20-30 feet.

The identifier is Modulated CW, (AM).
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K0OD
Member

Posts: 2954




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« Reply #10 on: July 23, 2017, 02:18:18 PM »

Yes, it's mostly about noise level but I'm on a one-acre lot in a residential suburb of St Louis, a pretty typical ham location and I feel no need to use anything more than my 43' ham vertical for longwave reception. For casual listening in all but the highest noise locations, you probably won't need a costly or complex receiving system recommended by some here. As KM1H suggests, try a long hunk of random wire first.

Here's a nice piece on NDB basics:
http://www.w3eee.com/ndb_what.html

As for antennas, there's wide variation. Here's a gallery of many NDB and other longwave beacon sites.
http://www.auroralchorus.com/ndb/ndbgllry.htm

A typical NDB antenna with a very prominent top hat





       
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