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Author Topic: Coax entry to house  (Read 5497 times)
KT4DLB
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Posts: 109




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« on: July 18, 2017, 01:52:57 PM »

Looking for some ideas on getting the coax and rotor cable into the house. My wife and I have moved in to take care of my 82 year old mother that has dementia. She had storm windows install over the wooden frame windows that was place in when the house was built in 1962. I have thought about just drilling a hole in the floor and bring into the house that way. But  I can't crawl under house due to bad knees. I also thought about drilling a hole into the wooden bottom of the window and run that. I don't think that would look good at all. However I do it, this hopefully will be the last time that I plan to move. I will have coax for a Hexbeam, Hustler 5BTV, end fed long wire and possibly 2 meter beam and vertical plus  six conductor rotor wire. Thanks for any advice  you can give.

Lamar
KT4DLB
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K8AC
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Posts: 1763




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« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2017, 07:45:15 AM »

Lamar - I don't think that there's ever a good solution for getting cables through a double-hung window and the storm window just complicates that.  MFJ makes that nice wooden strip with connectors on it, but then you have to deal with insulating between the open and closed window sashes.  I suggest you consider going through the wall.  I've done that with great success and used off the shelf PVC electrical pieces from Lowes or Home Depot.  I used a plastic hood outside, mated to a section of 2" PVC tubing with the threaded end sticking out past the wallboard indoors.  There I used a metal outlet plate, with the hole enlarged, and a large "nut" securing the tubing to the plate.  After running the cables through, just stuff each end with fiberglass insulation.  If you do it that way, you should drill the hole from the outside so it can be positioned properly in relation to the siding.  Of course you need to make sure you don't hit a stud or electrical line in the wall, but those can be easily located with available detectors. 
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KL7CW
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Posts: 255




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« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2017, 10:36:12 AM »

I always first try and locate the stud with stud finder or just by banging on the wall.  Next I drill a small hole (1/8 to 1/4 inch) from either side and explore around the void with a probe...possibly a coat hanger or whatever.  If you drilled the exploratory hole from the outside and do not have a long shank drill bit you may be able to just put a length of coat hanger wire in the drill motor chuck and drill right through the inside sheetrock.  If you need to move the hole, no problem....just a small patch.  If you have fiberglass insulation in the wall...the coat hanger "drill bit" may work even better than a long drill bit since the drill bit will tend to wind up the fiberglass.  Or clear out a void in the glass, then work the drill bit all the way through to the opposite side before you start the motor, then stop it as soon as you get your SMALL pilot hole through the wall.  Please make sure that the outside hole is slightly lower than the inside hole to prevent any water from entering.
It is very important to carefully explore around the void before you run a drill bit all the way through the walls.  You do not want to hit a water pipe, heat vent, electrical line, fire break, intercom wire, or many other things which like to hide in walls and ambush the unsuspecting ham.  No need to ask me how I know.  Both in the ham and commercial worlds, it is always a good idea to plan for at least double the opening size you think you will ever need.  When I recently relocated my ham shack, I did not want to route a large bundle of coax through the house, so instead installed a remote coax switch.  Very handy.  The switch could be outside the house.
                      Rick  KL7CW
                   
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KT4DLB
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« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2017, 01:22:02 PM »

I appreciate the information from both  of you. You both had the same idea on how to approach the situation. And I agree that drilling thru the wall would be the best bet. Thank you for your help. I hope that we can all meet on the air sometime.


Lamar
KT4DLB
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W7WRJ
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« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2017, 04:22:56 AM »

I totally agree with the 2 post above.  Through the wall is the way to go, and stay away from the windows.  If you live in a house that is frame construction, it's easy,  all you need is a drill and hole saw.  You can just pass the cables through, or mount a plate on the inside and outside, and use some long barrel connectors for the RF connections.  At my QTH,  the walls were 8 inch solid block, so I had to core drill two 4 inch holes.  I made matching aluminum plates for the inside and outside, and used 12 inch PL-259 barrel connectors for the RF connections, and a 2" conduit for the control and rotor cables.  Worked out great, and I can support, a total of 7 RF connections from inside to outside, and currently have four 8 conductor rotor cables, and a 25 pair cable for controlling the remote antenna switches.  You can see a picture of the inside on my QRZ page.

https://www.qrz.com/db/W7WRJ/

73's,

Mike Chasse
w7wrj
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K2QB
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Posts: 176




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« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2017, 08:03:44 AM »

I have a 4" PVC going through the sill plate from the basement to the outside. On the outside I have a 90deg. rounded elbow pointed down. The elbow is not glued on allowing me to remove it when I need to pull new coax in or out making it much easier not having to traverse the 90deg. bend. Once the coax is in I just slide the elbow back in place. I seal the PVC in the basement with some insulation and rags to keep any draft or bugs out. On the outside next to the PVC I have a DXE utility enclosure with my lightening protection that all my coax and rotor cable route through.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2017, 08:23:11 AM »

An "LB" box is made for this exact application. It's basically a 90 deg elbow with a removable water-tight cover.
 
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Bob  AA4PB
Garrisonville, VA
K3GM
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Posts: 2221




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« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2017, 03:57:39 PM »

I had a concrete coring contractor bore a 7" diameter hole in my 12" thick poured concrete wall.  I installed a plate on the outside surface after installing lightning arrestors on the inside surface and"inside" the large bore.  The advantage of coring is the hole edges are very sharp with no breakout, and you can retain the core to replace in the wall should you move later on as I am in the process of doing.
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KC1GCG
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« Reply #8 on: August 02, 2017, 11:51:38 AM »

Hi lamar.
Another idea to reduce the number of holes needed is to get a remote coax switch then you just have one coax one rotary cable and one small cable for the switch. I have a 8 position remote and really enjoy it. Other option without drilling any holes is buying or making a feedthru that mounts in your window like an ac unit. I made one for my first few months in the hobby out of pine. I made it wide enough to fit reasonably well on the primary window inside and the storm window out. I now have drilled a hole to enter the basement and am about finished with a feedthru box with a copper plate and lightning arrestors and my remote switch box. Keep in mind the NEC says you have to have lightning protection on all entry points. Whether to follow the nec is a debate for another thread. Smiley
Good luck....John k1jrf
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KT4DLB
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Posts: 109




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« Reply #9 on: October 25, 2017, 12:28:11 PM »

Well I just wanted to let everyone that gave suggestion know what I ended up doing. I had a hole drilled to where I could place 1 1/2" pvc pipe thru the wall with a LB connector on the outside. I have pvc pipe running from it down to the ground where my coax and rotor wire comes to the house. It worked out great and couldn't ask for it to have worked out any better. I want to thank all of you for your suggestions and insight on how to handle this. Hope to meet everyone one the air sometime.

73's

Lamar
KT4DLB
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NA4IT
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Posts: 41


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« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2017, 03:48:03 AM »

An "LB" box is made for this exact application. It's basically a 90 deg elbow with a removable water-tight cover.

At one time I used an LB. I packed steel wool in the bottom hole to keep out no-se-ums and other critters.

I now use a PVC box with a snap shut cover as I have conduit underground to my tower.

There are pictures on this page... http://www.qsl.net/na4it/tower/tower.html.
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