Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 ... 5 6 7 8 9 [10]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Why not an FT-891 for portable QRP??  (Read 25188 times)
KB4MNG
Member

Posts: 265




Ignore
« Reply #135 on: September 27, 2017, 08:25:02 AM »

Just pulled the trigger and have one on the way. I bought it from HRO. No rebate to deal with $579 is the straight price. With the Heil mic and cable, it is a very good bargain compared to what else on the market, even the Chinese stuff. It will be a portable cw rig for me, I figure if I can't handle the short comings, i'll get rid of it.

Their sales have been phenomenal on this radio. From what i understand, the free heil mic offer will not be around much longer.
Logged
K0UA
Member

Posts: 1355




Ignore
« Reply #136 on: September 27, 2017, 09:21:09 AM »

Just pulled the trigger and have one on the way. I bought it from HRO. No rebate to deal with $579 is the straight price. With the Heil mic and cable, it is a very good bargain compared to what else on the market, even the Chinese stuff. It will be a portable cw rig for me, I figure if I can't handle the short comings, i'll get rid of it.

Their sales have been phenomenal on this radio. From what i understand, the free heil mic offer will not be around much longer.

I think you will be pleased with it. Sure you have to deal with menus a little, but there just isn't room for every button you might need.  It does have some "quirks", like resetting the DSP to the default setting (off) every time you change bands.  but hey you get used to that pretty quickly. Besides they could change that in firmware. Some have complained about the somewhat unorthodox method of changes modes, where you select mode (by long pressing the band button) and then have to spin the VFO knob to the selected mode and do it before it times out and goes to whatever mode is selected.  BUT after you get used to the idea, it is kinda cool, and it saves you from having to do another key press to get back to VFO operation screen.  I kinda like it.   All in all, it is a lot of rig for the money.
Logged
ND6M
Member

Posts: 551




Ignore
« Reply #137 on: September 27, 2017, 10:02:06 AM »



I see now that it is buried in the MON menu. As if anyone would know what MON is, intuitively. Anyway my point is made, if you ever have to depend on this thing and don't have the manual and a way to search it easily, you are going to be in trouble.
Thanks for the answer.
[/quote]

I have been a very active ham for over 42 years and can usually figure out most radios enough to put them on line without the manual.
What I mean by that is, "someone shows me their new radio and I did not have a chance to RTFM." But with today's modern radios that are small, like your's, it's hard to get away without reading the manual. An FT 991 (non A version) was donated to our club. I figured I better learn my way around this radio so I can teach other's. OMG ! Talk about user issues without a manual. There are so many features on this radio that you may want to use and you WILL NOT get by without reading the manual. There are about 10 screens of functions to go through for daily use. Next you go into the setup menus. I think there are about 150 of them. Don't even ask me how to set up the memory channels. This has to be the most user unfriendly radio I have even used. Go to a ham radio store and sit next to one and you will understand.
It has taken me numerous days to set this radio up so it's ready to be put on line.

Barry
[/quote]

right church, wrong pew
Logged
K0UA
Member

Posts: 1355




Ignore
« Reply #138 on: September 27, 2017, 11:10:15 AM »

I got my little cute portable key today.  Worked one station so far with it.  I believe it is going to be a keeper.  It is light and small, but it stayed on the table fine with its little rubber feet.  It feels pretty good, and has some bearings in it up front.  Nice adjustable weight and contact spacing.  Not bad for a piece of plastic made on a 3d printer.






I was surprised how well made it was.  I took a chance on e-bay, but I am very pleased with it for the money.
That sir, is freaking awesome!!!!
Logged
ZENKI
Member

Posts: 1421




Ignore
« Reply #139 on: September 29, 2017, 10:38:16 PM »

Yeah they can but hams keep on  insisting that a "real QRP radio" is a some Micky mouse toy radio thats as useful as a Dick Tracy wrist watch HF radio.

Really these days any QRP radio should have a high efficiency amplifier that maintains its efficiency from 0.5 watts to 30 watts. This can  easily be done. But the JA designs are  always  several years behind in their engineering ability.

I wonder why anyone wants to use AA batteries in a radio when you can get high efficiency Model car LIPO or even high voltage Lithium battery packs  like drill batteries that are almost the same size as a  AA battery pack. Its just plain dumb to  be using the worst possible battery  for a high current device like a radio. Why not 18650 batteries or use the readily available model car battery packs?

 20 to 30 watts is ideal power  output that is suitable for DX and  in country short skip communications. Instead of struggling  with 5  watts to 10 watts screaming your lungs out, you could be having an effective conversation just as if you were using 100 watts the difference is so small.

Is it then a surprise that most military HF manpack radios operate with this power output. If 10 watts or less was as effective as hams make it out to be the Military would have long adopted this power output. They have to get the message  out not say   "better luck next week for the QSL card"

In many countries they have this new "novice"  10 watt  license, most stations give this license away because  all that it teaches these new hams that ham radio on HF  with 10 watts is  massive exercise in futility most of the time with average wire and vertical antennas. If they gave  these stations an effective power limit of 20 to 30 watts they might get more enjoyment from ham radio and stick with the hobby rather than beating their heads against the 5 watt or 10 watt QRP nonsense brick wall screaming their lungs out.

Even back in WW2 when they parachuted spies into occupied Europe with the spy suitcase radios like Type 2 Mk3 B2 suitcase radio, these radios  had output powers of 20  to 30 watts. Which was  effective with indoor  random wire antennas ensuring  vital intelligence got through.


The Yaesu FT857 with a high efficiency  PA that maintained its efficiency between 1 and 30  watts running on 18650  batteries would be ideal. Even the old Icom 703 with 30  watts of output and 18650  batteries would have been ideal. These radios should have a built in  high impedance random wire tuner and even a Shunt Vertical tuner. Better still would be a stepper motor driver   circuit that will drive  a stepper motor for a magnetic loop antenna. All built into one box.

There is  nothing more ridiculous   than buying a  small radio like the KX3 and having to carry  a sports bag full of junk and accessories  in the trunk to make the radio an effective solution. Its even  more ridiculous to buy a QRP  radio and add a filthy CB amplifier and carry that around when all you really needed was a 25 watt output PA or radio!

The other point as well   is this. With 30 watts of output you could easily drive a new generation LDMOS amplifier to 1.5KW output without needing a big  fat  DC power supply. A 1.5kw/QRP  console would be possible.

I think the lack of a great QRP radio with all the modern design features is not available because  hams themselves dont want to change their thinking about what is possible. It also does not help when the ham manufacturing industry   is slow and  dont have the required engineers to design these products. The ham industry is more about recycling old ideas and technology  rather than coming up with new concepts.

Its  only the likes of Elecraft and Flexradio that have been willing to take a new road with new thinking even if their products are far from ideal. Yaesu  had some fresh ideas with the FT897 design. Its shame they did not keep that concept and further refine  that radio into the ultimate all in one QRP solution. Say 25 watts output with 18650 batteries. They could have then added a nice small switch mode power supply  and a DC to DC converter that allowed the radio to operate from 90VAC to 260 VAC and from 10 to 60 volts DC. With a built in tune anything tuner you could have  had a nice QRP/portable radio that you could hold in one hand rather than the mess of accessories and cables that so many hams carry with their cutesy  10 watt radio that achieves very little in weight or convenience over say a carrying a radio like the IC706 with a light switch mode power supply and antenna tuner.

Maybe one day, when QRP hams get the idea that a 25 watt radio can be turned down to 5 watts of output!



Here is my 2 cents on this discussion.  I have used the FT450 as a low power portable rig, but just like any other 100 watt class radio, it is terribly inefficient when set to 5 watts. The bias current it somewhere around 4 amps before any modulation is even applied to the radio.  Do the math, 4 amps x 12 volts means you are putting 48 watts into the radio as heat before a single watt is coming out. So putting out 5 watts you are burning up 5 amps or so of current.  60 watts of input for 5 watts out. Sure it is great to be able to have the extra power on tap when you need it. Sometimes 5 watts just doesn't cut it. But you better have a sufficient battery.

Someone of the big 3 needs to come out with a modern QRP radio to compete with the Elecraft models. at about half the price.

The Icom 7300 has taken the world by storm, and kicked the legs out from under the competition. It is more radio for less money than anything in its class.  Why can't someone come up with a QRP radio to blow away the competition in the same vain as the 7300?
Logged
YL3GND
Member

Posts: 55




Ignore
« Reply #140 on: September 30, 2017, 01:31:25 AM »

Everything right, Zenki! Except few details.

18650 internal batteries, 25...40W output power, ATU etc - that is exactly what my portable transceiver offers. Unfortunately it is not possible to buy such a radio, it's non existent on a market, so I built one my self instead!

For to obtain clean output power with good efficiency, I have changed supply voltage standard from 12...13.8V to 22.2V (20...25V) standard for me. Only then most good 18650's (6 in a line) are capable to deliver. 18650's are good for up to around 3 amps. Everything runs better on a model "Li-Po" soft packs. "6C" pack = 22.2V nominal 25.2V max. Amperage are almost non limited on these - 50A or more if You want.

..."maintains its efficiency from 0.5 watts to 30 watts" - it is not possible with traditional PA's! You should not be working below 40...60% of rated max Pout, if You want good efficiency. And You would never made 100W transceiver running entirely on 13V, if the efficiency was a concern. At least traditional output stages needs higher voltage for linearity and efficiency. If changing a 13.8V standard could be a problem for some, than driving output stages from higher voltages are not - efficient voltage booster (works on TX only) is not a problem. 

Egmont
« Last Edit: September 30, 2017, 01:49:53 AM by YL3GND » Logged
WB4M
Member

Posts: 254




Ignore
« Reply #141 on: September 30, 2017, 11:02:19 AM »

Old thread but in a nutshell, nothing is wrong with an 891 portable.  But the vast majority of hams who operate portable are doing so from locations which require you to be as light as you can, hence smaller rigs that have minimal power draw from small batteries.  Look at SOTA activators and what they are using.  But if you are going to drive your Jeep to a local park and operate, then your 891 will be just fine.
Logged
YL3GND
Member

Posts: 55




Ignore
« Reply #142 on: September 30, 2017, 12:52:20 PM »

Or even shorter: FT-891 is OK for portable operations but not for QRP portable!  Wink 
Logged
KB4MNG
Member

Posts: 265




Ignore
« Reply #143 on: October 09, 2017, 03:23:15 AM »

I'm really liking the ft 891. I'm using it as a base and probably will do that the majority of the time. It would be great portable. Not for hiking up a mountain but will fit most needs. When I want to operate off a 9v battery, ill take the k1 Grin
Logged
KM4DYX
Member

Posts: 62




Ignore
« Reply #144 on: October 09, 2017, 04:07:21 AM »

Yeah they can but hams keep on  insisting that a "real QRP radio" is a some Micky mouse toy radio thats as useful as a Dick Tracy wrist watch HF radio.


While we're nailing down the specs of this rig can we also include MIL STD 810G for drop, dust, temperature, shock and vibration? And how about water resistance?

Did I mention internal battery, soundcard, and ATU? And front face connectors for mic, key, antenna?

An updated SGC 2020...how hard would it be? I'd pay $1500 for a rig like that. I won't pay $1500 for a rig that, though it has all the bells and whistles that hams love, wouldn't survive being dropped three feet or a sprinkle of rain.

73,
Al
Logged
N9AOP
Member

Posts: 641




Ignore
« Reply #145 on: October 09, 2017, 11:17:04 AM »

There are some military manpacs out there that will work in a monsoon and survive the nastiest UPS driver but they are not cheap.  Speaking of military, our county as a RACAL repeater which can be delivered by slowing down your truck to about 40 and kicking it out the tailgate.  After it gets done bouncing, it works just fine.  I think the original price was around 30K.
Art
Logged
KM4DYX
Member

Posts: 62




Ignore
« Reply #146 on: October 09, 2017, 03:07:46 PM »

There are some military manpacs out there that will work in a monsoon and survive the nastiest UPS driver but they are not cheap. 
Art

Yeah, I've humped some of those beasts, and their batteries, and their hand crank generators. We can do better, now. Anybody ever use a QMAC HF90? That looked to be a step in the right direction.

73,
Al
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 ... 5 6 7 8 9 [10]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!