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Author Topic: Weird chanting? 7295 @~0430z  (Read 2420 times)
KJ6ZOL
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« on: August 03, 2017, 09:49:58 PM »

I was testing out my new rig tonight and happened upon a weird signal on 7295. It sounded a lot like Islamic chanting and/or prayer. There was no "explanations" after the chants like the Saudis used to do. Does anybody know what country this is? My guess would be either Saudi Arabia or Iran, they likely have the only SW broadcasting left in the Islamic world.
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VK2JEM
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« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2017, 11:08:54 PM »

Radio Algerienne Via Issoudun

Quraan reading (chanting)
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KJ6ZOL
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« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2017, 07:15:12 AM »

Radio Algerienne Via Issoudun

Quraan reading (chanting)

I'll have to make a note of this one-I've long been fascinated by Qur'an chanting, despite not knowing a word of Arabic. When Saudi Arabia used to have a sunrise (local time) religious broadcast I listened in every so often. The real interesting part of the old Saudi broadcast was the praying, it went on and on and on without stopping.
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KC4ZGP
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« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2017, 09:50:49 AM »


Radio Algeria is still on the air? Wow!

Kraus
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KAPT4560
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« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2017, 04:15:16 PM »

  Prayer and the call to worship in any language is beautiful. I enjoy the middle-eastern music as well. The more developed areas may have internet and AC mains, but many rural areas rely on portable radios.
 
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N8YX
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« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2017, 04:30:30 PM »

...The more developed areas may have internet and AC mains, but many rural areas rely on portable radios.
 
Which was nice on the 120 and 90M SWBC bands back in the day - before most of the locals switched to FMBCB. Could snag lots of sub-10KW tropicals with a decent antenna and receiver.
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KJ6ZOL
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« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2017, 06:07:59 PM »

...The more developed areas may have internet and AC mains, but many rural areas rely on portable radios.
 
Which was nice on the 120 and 90M SWBC bands back in the day - before most of the locals switched to FMBCB. Could snag lots of sub-10KW tropicals with a decent antenna and receiver.

Satellite television is common in the Middle East, a lot of people rely on that for info rather than SW. As in much of the rest of the world, the Middle East has seen rapid urbanization over the last 30 years or so, and many more people live in cities and can listen to FM stations. That's true even in many of the areas that have been the focus of American "democratization" efforts-central and southern Iraq are gradually rebuilding (at least outside of former Islamic State areas), and Syrians are gradually returning to Aleppo. Like Kraus, I thought Algeria went QRT on SW long ago. I believe that the Saudi rationale for their domestic SW was the significant numbers of Bedouin nomads that existed there as late as a decade ago. At one point, Egypt had a SW service targeted towards Muslims in the UK; reports said that a prayer or Qur'an verse would be recited, then it would be translated into English. That was before the 2011 revolution. Unfortunately, I never heard that myself.
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KJ6ZOL
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« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2017, 06:15:17 PM »

  Prayer and the call to worship in any language is beautiful. I enjoy the middle-eastern music as well.

There is much to criticize about Islam, but the recitation of their scriptures and prayers has a lyrical beauty to them that is unique, and I've been a SWL since the mid-80s. In fact, the word "qur'an" means "recitation", and many scholars think that they were written in such a way so that they could be spread by traditional Arabian bards from memory, since few people could read. Cultures in Africa and West Asia traditionally relied on wandering bards to preserve history and knowledge, people who passed on such in lyrical form from memory.
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