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Author Topic: Anyone in US able to receive Radio (North) Korea in English?  (Read 4245 times)
AE5X
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Posts: 1016




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« on: September 05, 2017, 04:52:40 PM »

This SWLer is receiving them fairly clearly but I'm not sure he's in the US:
https://swling.com/blog/2017/09/shortwave-radio-recordings-voice-of-korea-announces-hydrogen-bomb-detonation/

Their programming could be quite interesting in the weeks/months to come...
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ONAIR
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Posts: 3525




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« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2017, 10:51:18 PM »

This SWLer is receiving them fairly clearly but I'm not sure he's in the US:
https://swling.com/blog/2017/09/shortwave-radio-recordings-voice-of-korea-announces-hydrogen-bomb-detonation/

Their programming could be quite interesting in the weeks/months to come...

  Have you tried online web SDRs?
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KC4ZGP
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Posts: 1637




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« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2017, 05:18:50 AM »


North Korea knuckleheads are on the air?

You know the world was quite safe when the U.S.S.R. existed. They kept satellite nations like
North Korea in line. The Soviet Union knew it would be suicide to let their 'territories' have
nukes of any kind.

And with the U.K. and the U.S. on the other side, the rest of the world looked on as if they
were watching a tennis match.

We had real world peace then.

Kraus
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KJ6ZOL
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Posts: 820




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« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2017, 02:08:32 PM »

This SWLer is receiving them fairly clearly but I'm not sure he's in the US:
https://swling.com/blog/2017/09/shortwave-radio-recordings-voice-of-korea-announces-hydrogen-bomb-detonation/

Their programming could be quite interesting in the weeks/months to come...


The best time to hear DPRK is in the morning USA time, when the Asia-NAm path is mostly in darkness. Apparently the thinking is that since the propagation is ideal at that time then that's when they should tx. I doubt they have any concept of what mornings are like for most in USA, how our households are kinda crazy and rushed in the mornings as people eat breakfast, groom themselves, and rush off to work/school. Nobody has any time to sit and listen to the radio. But hey, nobody ever accused the Wonderful Leaders of Juche Korea of being rational.  Roll Eyes Tongue  If anybody wants to look up the tx times, the station is called Voice of Korea.
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RENTON481
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Posts: 186




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« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2017, 06:30:21 PM »

I used to hear them in English during late mornings, as late as a year and a half ago (when I last heard the English program) even on an old multibander transistor radio.

I heard some of their other language programming during early evenings on my Grundig G2 (Korean language transmissions) as late as last year, and I'm in the NW US.

If they are still broadcasting, they still should be audible here in North America, at least on the West Coast.
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KJ6ZOL
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Posts: 820




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« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2017, 01:57:29 PM »

I used to hear them in English during late mornings, as late as a year and a half ago (when I last heard the English program) even on an old multibander transistor radio.

I heard some of their other language programming during early evenings on my Grundig G2 (Korean language transmissions) as late as last year, and I'm in the NW US.

If they are still broadcasting, they still should be audible here in North America, at least on the West Coast.

I found a listing of Voice of Korea English tx's that said that their English language service to NAm uses 9435 and 11710 at 1300 and 1500 UTC. That would be 6 am and 8 am my local time, Pacific Daylight Time. Recent (2017) reception reports say that the broadcasts sometimes disappear suddenly and without warning in the middle of the program, possibly due to electricity supply problems either at the studios in Pyongyang or at the transmitter site whose location is unknown. I've heard evening broadcasts from VoK that seem to be jammed by South Korea using Korean language transmissions of some kind. Sometimes the South will even jam English language VoK broadcasts to other parts of the world in the evenings my local time. South Korea has an unusual choice of jammer, instead of using a continual noise like the old USSR Bubble or the Chinese Firedrake they use programming in Korean.
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W3RSW
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Posts: 536




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« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2017, 10:54:54 AM »

Stronger S. Korean carrier at receive point ? --or perhaps more diabolically, Korean language very close to similar or same words in Korean language picked by a good software algorithm based on what the northern diatribe usually says or has stated in aural sentence structure in the past. This would make interpretation of jammed meaning more complex than simply just "talking over"  N. Korean message with other program content.  Then again, competing national anthems or ACDC Rock might be kind of interesting.  Grin
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Rick, W3RSW
KJ6ZOL
Member

Posts: 820




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« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2017, 12:01:48 PM »

Stronger S. Korean carrier at receive point ? --or perhaps more diabolically, Korean language very close to similar or same words in Korean language picked by a good software algorithm based on what the northern diatribe usually says or has stated in aural sentence structure in the past. This would make interpretation of jammed meaning more complex than simply just "talking over"  N. Korean message with other program content.  Then again, competing national anthems or ACDC Rock might be kind of interesting.  Grin

Sort of along the lines of the old "black clandestine" stations used during the Vietnam War, I guess. The point of the black clandestine was to confuse listeners by offering a similar sounding tx close in freq to the "real clandestine" Viet Minh stns except with programming content that slanted towards the South Viet viewpoint. Given the heavy involvement of the CIA in RoK propaganda, it's probably likely that something along the lines of black clandestines are used. I know for certain that DPRK and RoK each have strong propaganda stns on the DMZ which are jammed heavily by the opposing side.
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RENTON481
Member

Posts: 186




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« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2017, 06:11:31 AM »

One interesting thing to do is tune in the propaganda broadcasts in Korean -- I think they're North Korean broadcasts towards the South, on several frequencies in the low HF band (the present frequencies escape me, but there are a couple even in the 60 meter and 75 meter SWBC bands, if memory serves -- and maybe one in the 41 meter band). A couple of you guys may be referring to the same broadcasts. They sound like Korean harangues, covered by white noise or warble jammers. Very interesting to hear.
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