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Author Topic: ...ARRL RENEW MEMBERSHIP...  (Read 14353 times)
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 6310




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« Reply #45 on: October 07, 2017, 08:10:06 PM »

Peter:  Excellent reply but I figure it went over the head of many!
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WA7PRC
Member

Posts: 1837


WWW

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« Reply #46 on: October 08, 2017, 12:06:16 AM »

I've been an ARRL member for over 50 years.  I recently opted out of receiving QST because I don't care for what I see in it....BUT I do support them 100% because they are our go-between our hobby and existence.  
[snip]
You may want to rethink that. If they're between our hobby and existence then, our hobby must be non-existent.  Wink

And, I could care less (but, not much).
OTOH, I couldn't care less.
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N2MG
Administrator

Posts: 10046



« Reply #47 on: October 09, 2017, 04:48:54 AM »

@Peter:  Wasn't the cry in 1776 'No taxation without representation'?

Yes, but taxation is done by force of law (using sword, gun, jail, etc)
Joining ARRL is voluntary.

Bu you know that. ;-)

Mike N2MG
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 6310




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« Reply #48 on: October 09, 2017, 09:54:19 AM »

PRC:

Quote
because they are our go-between our hobby and existence. 

Go ahead and pick at and make fun of my terminology or phrasing.  I couldn't care less.  Any reasonably intelligent person understands what I am trying to say.

If you can't understand me, may I suggest you go back to your comic books?
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N8YX
Member

Posts: 966




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« Reply #49 on: October 09, 2017, 10:02:46 AM »

If you can't understand me, may I suggest you go back to your comic books?
El Oh El ...
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K9MHZ
Member

Posts: 1436




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« Reply #50 on: October 09, 2017, 10:34:33 AM »

You may want to rethink that. If they're between our hobby and existence then, our hobby must be non-existent.  Wink

And, I could care less (but, not much).
OTOH, I couldn't care less.

Eh....huh?

Must be ham humor.
 
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KOP
Member

Posts: 232




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« Reply #51 on: October 09, 2017, 02:52:57 PM »

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October 02, 2017, 07:53:41 PM
N8AUC
Member

Posts: 313




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« Reply #52 on: October 09, 2017, 03:24:44 PM »

...should I renew my ARRL membership?...is it worth it???...

Whether it's worth it or not, is a personal decision that you, and only you can make.
No one can dictate to you whether you think it's worth it. People will try, but only
you can make that decision for yourself.

As for me, (and I just renewed my ARRL membership) I happen to think it is worth it.

But I didn't always think this way.

Once upon a time, a long time ago, back when I was young, skinny, and had a full
head of hair (none of which was gray), I had an encounter with a person who,
at the time, was the ARRL Great Lakes Division Director. I was a very broke college
student at the time. It was at a hamfest, and he was manning an ARRL table, and
he was clearly attempting to recruit new members. But he was such a pompous,
condescending jerk who left such a bad impression of what ARRL was all about,
that I swore I'd never, ever support an organization that had a complete jack
wagon like him as one of its directors.

And I held that opinion for quite a few years. But "never" is a very, very long time.

Until one day, at a club meeting when I was living in St. Louis, I had the good
fortune to meet Paul and Helen Grauer. Paul was the Midwest Division director at
the time, and he had been invited to be our guest speaker. I went into that
meeting thinking, "yeah, whatever, another ARRL dork, when do we get to the
donuts?". Paul and his wife Helen, who traveled with him at the time, were such
nice, genuine, gracious people. I was very surprised, because I thought that all the
ARRL bigwigs were pompous, condescending jerks. He spoke very honestly and
candidly about what ARRL was, and what it wasn't. What the ARRL did, and what
it didn't do. And what he thought the ARRL should be doing that it wasn't doing.
He also explained, very clearly, about why he thought that the work ARRL did on
behalf of Amateur Radio as a whole, was important and worthy of support.

He didn't try to tell me what to think, how to think, or what to do. He didn't
demand that I fill out an application and pay the dues that night.
But he planted a seed. He changed my opinion of ARRL that night.  

Is the ARRL perfect? Absolutely not. It's run by humans, who are decidedly
imperfect. They've certainly made some bone-headed mistakes in the past.
But the ARRL is much more than the publisher of QST magazine.
Based on my experience, they do attempt to operate and do things that
benefit Amateur Radio as a whole. They support lobbying efforts on
behalf of our hobby in Washington when no one else does. They also represent
the United States at international conferences, as our friend from the UK has
mentioned, when no one else does. And they are, by default if nothing else,
our National Society for Amateur Radio, and are recognized as such by the
ITU, and IARU. Doing these things costs real money. More than can be raised
through membership dues. Which is why they sell books and advertising in QST.
But these things are important for the continued existence and growth of our
hobby. And these are things I see as worthy of my financial support as a member.

But here's the thing. ARRL is a membership organization. Which means that if
you decide to become (or remain) a member, you get a voice in what happens.
Even if that voice is small, it's very real. And it's very difficult to effect any
kind of change in a membership organization if you are not a member.

I am an ARRL member. I currently hold a field organization appointment. And
I will continue to remain an ARRL member for three reasons:
1) I believe that the work that ARRL undertakes for the benefit of Amateur
    Radio as a whole is worthy of my support,
2) I want to help ensure that Amateur Radio continues to be here for the
    next generation just as those who came before did for me, and
3) If I have a voice and a vote, I want to make sure that at least where I
    live, we never again have pompous, condescending jerks running the show.

Frankly, I hope you decide to remain with us.
But that's a decision that only you can make.
Good luck in making your decision.

73 de N8AUC
Eric

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K9MHZ
Member

Posts: 1436




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« Reply #53 on: October 10, 2017, 05:30:41 AM »

Eric,

If your comments are for general consumption, then great.  If they're for the OP specifically, he's not interested in anything thoughtful or well-reasoned.  He's clearly telling a question with this thread topic, and if you look him up, you'll find some bizarre reading by his hand.

Good post.

Best,
Brad
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AA4HA
Member

Posts: 2381




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« Reply #54 on: October 10, 2017, 01:56:17 PM »

I gave up on the ARRL a few years ago. They seemed to be preoccupied by jousting at windmills for the entire HOA thing. Other things that they could of been working on (band protections, spectrum usage and public outreach) were left by the wayside.

I am sure that many people are happy with their membership. I just could not justify the annual amount for such little return.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
Free space loss (dB) = 32.4 + 20 × log10d + 20 × log10 f
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 8123




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« Reply #55 on: October 10, 2017, 02:27:56 PM »

Eric said
Quote
But the ARRL is much more than the publisher of QST magazine.
Based on my experience, they do attempt to operate and do things that
benefit Amateur Radio as a whole. They support lobbying efforts on
behalf of our hobby in Washington when no one else does. They also represent
the United States at international conferences, as our friend from the UK has
mentioned, when no one else does. And they are, by default if nothing else,
our National Society for Amateur Radio, and are recognized as such by the
ITU, and IARU. Doing these things costs real money. More than can be raised
through membership dues. Which is why they sell books and advertising in QST.
But these things are important for the continued existence and growth of our
hobby. And these are things I see as worthy of my financial support as a member.

Without ARRL in 1925, we wouldn't have got IARU when we did, or the voices for amateur radio at the Madrid Conference in 1932 or Cairo in 1937 or Atlantic City in 1947....It took RSGB many years to be allowed to send a delegate to as part of the UK delegation to what are now WRCs. There are a good number of other countries who go to a WRC without amateur representation on their team....

Eric is totally correct - which is one reason why, I as a G station, am an ARRL member (with no vote on Directors!). Yes, I am also an RSGB member and am entitled to two simultaneous free Life memberships - one as a Past President and the other as Honorary Life Vice President.
I do a lecture for radio clubs on IARU. It ends up with "Without wavelengths, there is no Amateur radio, and without IARU, there are no wavelengths".
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KOP
Member

Posts: 232




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« Reply #56 on: October 10, 2017, 02:57:25 PM »

Peter,
       I with out a doubt or exception agree that the A.R.R.L. was...

     Our path and experience couldn't be more different. I come from a mechanical backround that never strayed far from radio. Until recently I never had formal involvement with amateur radio. I did however acquire military, maritime, commercial and broadcast experience over the last 40 years.
      I am fully aware of and thankful for what the A.R.R.L. has done in the past. Without the A.R.R.L. there would be no amateur radio in the U.S. , at least not as we know it. That was then.
     The A.R.R.L. today is not the A.R.R.L. of yesteryear. To cite example would be stating the obvious. I'll represent myself to elected officials. I'll chance my voice being lost in comment to the FCC. I'll teach as I can and learn as I must. I will promote amateur radio to the best of my ability. I will not support the A.R.R.L. as long as their efforts are largely contrary to well being of amateur radio.
     I can easily see your point of view and agree wholeheartedly with your decision to support the A.R.R.L. I just can not in all conscience support them.
     I suppose that it is fortunate it's a matter of personal choice.
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October 02, 2017, 07:53:41 PM
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 8123




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« Reply #57 on: October 11, 2017, 03:11:26 PM »

Without ARRL, IARU would be a lot weaker. Even worse would be the loss in influence in CITEL. Now that doesn't affect directly us Europeans, but the effect on international working for US hams could be a problem if CITEL decided on R2 allocations that didn't accept amateurs - or only on a secondary basis. The US could footnote their abstention, but the QRM US amateurs could get could make some bands practically useless - even in the US.
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PLANKEYE
Member

Posts: 212




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« Reply #58 on: October 11, 2017, 04:48:05 PM »

I'm not sure exactly what the ARRL does and if they were to go away completely what would happen to ham radio.  When CB radio started back in 1945 and then became mainstream in the late 1970's could explain why we need SOMETHING or someone to enforce rules now within ham radio.  Or lobby for stuff ETC...  I don't know you guys know more about the ARRL so please enlighten us.   



CB radios required a licensed to operate. The license cost about $20 in the early 1970’s and was reduced to $4 in the late 1970’s. In addition, there were many rules and regulations concerning antenna height, distance restrictions, allowable transmitter power, and call sign rules. People ignored the laws and to hide their identity, developed “handles” or fake names to identify themselves on the radio. After the FCC started receiving over 1,000,000 license applications a month, the license requirement was dropped entirely but as the culture had already developed, people continued using handles such as “Big Mama” or “Timberwolf” to identify themselves while on the air.



In 2017 the ham radio license is extremely easy to obtain, yes you still have to test for it but a young child can and have passed it.  It's pretty easy I think all of us would agree.  What if the FCC made it harder to get your license?  Lets start by everyone retesting by Jan 1st 2019 change the question pool and bring back the 20 WPM code for extra 13 general 5 novice.  No published questions you just study your theory and procedures via a NEW handbook.  The FCC will provide the book.  If you don't retest your license is gone.  You have to retest every 3 years to keep your license. 


Anyone willing to do that?  Plus the FCC would enforce these rules if your caught your in trouble.  That would help ham radio because people wouldn't like it and they would leave and then you would have nice folks left over. 

Just a thought.  Or just drop the license requirement.       



     
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K9MHZ
Member

Posts: 1436




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« Reply #59 on: October 12, 2017, 07:33:45 PM »

If you're referring to the Class D Citizen's Band, which is 11 meters and popularized in the 1970s, it was started on Sept 11th, 1958, not in 1945.  That's why you see Heath DX-100 transmitters with 11 meters, because it was offered in the 1950s.  The band was targeted because most rigs and hence, band utilization, involved utilizing the harmonics of the oscillators of the 80 and 40 meter bands, and 27 MHz wasn't a multiple. 

There was no testing for CB.  No matter what you think of the current ham testing process, nothing like it existed for CB.       
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