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Author Topic: availibility of program to determine MODE being used?of  (Read 1354 times)
KC8Y
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Posts: 469




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« on: September 09, 2017, 03:42:29 PM »

is there a type/name of program, that can determine the digital MODE being copied?

I am handicapped and hard of hearing Sad  AND familiar with FLdigi

Sure hoped I picked the correct forum !!!!

Ken KC8Y

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K4SAV
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Posts: 2388




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« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2017, 11:15:14 AM »

Well it was a very good question and I would like to have that program too, but judging from the lack of answers, it's likely there is none.

Jerry, K4SAV
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K0UA
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Posts: 1380




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« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2017, 11:26:20 AM »

To answer your question, there are examples of the sounds of the modes on the internet. So you can listen to them and understand what they sound like .  You can look at them on the waterfall, and get an idea of what they are by the tracks they leave on the waterfall.  I don't know of a an digital mode identification program, but they could and likely exist in government circles.  My old AEA PK232 did to some extent have a "signal ident" routine in its programing, but it worked poorly.  it mostly worked to determine the shift and speed of RTTY signals, which are as rare as hens teeth now days except during RTTY contests.  And for that matter anyone worth his salt can determine the shift and speed of RTTY signals by ear/eye .

 Just listen to the signals, and compare them to the examples.  AND of course note the frequency of the signals, that along will tell you what they are as the various modes have "watering holes" where they congregate.  Of course there could be someone "off the reservation" and on a frequency with a mode that doesn't belong there.

Of course the moment I go hunt the internet for examples of signals, I find some sort of sig ident software.  Don't know if it works or not, but I am not surprised it exists.

https://www.rtl-sdr.com/artemis-free-signal-identification-software/

https://www.sigidwiki.com/wiki/Signal_Identification_Guide


Also remember you can hear these modes as you transmit them with the monitor function of your own radio turned on. 
« Last Edit: September 10, 2017, 11:36:19 AM by K0UA » Logged
K8AC
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Posts: 1765




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« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2017, 05:28:54 AM »

There are so many digital modes these days  that only a student of the digital modes would be able to identify the mode of a particular signal by listening to it.  It's far easier to differentiate several of the modes visually by looking at a waterfall display.  Or - since many of the modes have settled into particular frequency ranges, you can usually tell them apart by the frequency they're on.  These days FT8 is very popular and you'll find those signals on each band just below the ranges for JT-65 and JT-9.  If you use software designed for particular modes, such as WSJT-X, you can set the program for the particular mode you want to operate and it will be able to detect those signals properly.  Also, logging programs like DXLab interface with WSJT-X directly so that the mode of a QSO is properly inserted into the log and the log entry is made automatically.  You don't have to export the QSO from one program and import it into the other.  So, you could operate many of the digital modes and properly identify the mode without ever hearing any of the signals.  In fact, with a mode like FT8, I suggest that there is no advantage at all to being able to hear the signals.  Everything you need to know is on the waterfall or monitor screen.

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KC4ZGP
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Posts: 1637




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« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2017, 05:46:23 AM »


FL Digi identifies and switches to the mode.

Upper right corner, RXID on. But it works only if the sender has their TXID activated.

I don't know what the others call it.

Kraus
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K0UA
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Posts: 1380




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« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2017, 07:34:18 AM »


FL Digi identifies and switches to the mode.

Upper right corner, RXID on. But it works only if the sender has their TXID activated.

I don't know what the others call it.

Kraus

Reed-Solomon  Transmit Id. 
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KC4ZGP
Member

Posts: 1637




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« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2017, 10:30:07 AM »


It sounds biblical and kingly too.

At work right now 1730UTC. Listening to the wind and rain. Wow! My big loop sky wire and delta loop mast still standing at the house.

I'll Morse it when I arrive Kraus castle.

Oh and how goes that FT-891 K0UA?

Kraus
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