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Author Topic: What happened to QS1R?  (Read 6103 times)
N2MG
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Posts: 10068



« on: October 11, 2017, 07:39:48 AM »

I can't seem to find any online presence of a forum and mail list died around April.

Mike N2MG
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N2DTS
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Posts: 764




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« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2017, 12:13:54 PM »

Looks like he no longer makes them.
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K1YW
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Posts: 3




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« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2017, 08:50:24 AM »

I was in contact with Phil, N8VB two years ago. He was planning on an update to the QS1R back then. I haven't heard anything since. I hope he is doing well.

Greg
K1YW
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K1YW
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« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2017, 09:16:14 AM »

Update. I just took a peak at www.srl-llc.com. It looks like Phil is now selling his designs for general purpose applications.
FFT, CIC, DDC - code modules etc...  So the QS1R update is apparently deferred.
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N0YXB
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Posts: 1190




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« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2017, 10:56:13 AM »

Well that's too bad.
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K6JH
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Posts: 406




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« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2017, 12:10:20 PM »

The old wiki supposedly moved to http://n8vb.duckdns.org/doku.php although that link doesn't work for me right now. Looks like Phil has a lot going on that's keeping him from the old stuff.
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73
Jim K6JH
W3RSW
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Posts: 546




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« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2017, 12:24:28 PM »

However SDRMaxV GUI and server software is still available.
http://www.srl-llc.com/qs1r_latest/index.html

You might query Phil and his intentions on the yahoo board that appears inactive, not defunct, simply because no one's recently posted to it.  I also hope his personal situation is OK.

14 bit ADC SDR products do much of what the 16 bit QS1R does cheaper I suspect : Phil may have elected not to duplicate the QS1R with updated components, even though they too are cheaper than the originals.

For normal receiving duty I've used SDRMax 3 or Panoptis for years because of its artistic presentation and uncluttered (if desired) graphics. All the functions can be brought out in movable Windows.  

I'm keeping my QS1R for that reason, although for that same purpose I'm using the Hermes based board product for the also quite beautiful CuSDR GUI developed by Herman DL2HVH.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2017, 12:33:00 PM by W3RSW » Logged

Rick, W3RSW
N2MG
Administrator

Posts: 10068



« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2017, 08:37:32 AM »

Thanks guys.

Let's hope he's busy - good for him!

73 Mike N2MG
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N8VB
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Posts: 23


WWW

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« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2018, 07:30:40 AM »

Hello all,

Thanks for inquiring about the QS1R.

The QS1R is now out of production permanently.  

I was working on a replacement called the SRL2R, which ran embedded Linux and had both Ethernet and USB connectivity (as well as WiFi).  The prototype was completed and demonstrated in March of 2015.  

After selling two QS1R receivers and two QS1E exciters to a particular Japanese Ham who happened to work for a particular Japanese company (who produces Amateur Radios in addition to commercial radios), the ICOM IC-7300 and IC-R8600 radios were born (whose internal construction were strikingly similar to the QS1R and QS1E).  At that time, after evaluating the SWL and HAM market for SDR Receivers, I made the decision to cancel the SRL2R and exit those markets.

There is no replacement for the QS1R in the works.

Regards,
Phil N8VB

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N2WQ
Member

Posts: 107




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« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2018, 10:27:00 AM »

Hello all,

Thanks for inquiring about the QS1R.

The QS1R is now out of production permanently.  

I was working on a replacement called the SRL2R, which ran embedded Linux and had both Ethernet and USB connectivity (as well as WiFi).  The prototype was completed and demonstrated in March of 2015.  

After selling two QS1R receivers and two QS1E exciters to a particular Japanese Ham who happened to work for a particular Japanese company (who produces Amateur Radios in addition to commercial radios), the ICOM IC-7300 and IC-R8600 radios were born (whose internal construction were strikingly similar to the QS1R and QS1E).  At that time, after evaluating the SWL and HAM market for SDR Receivers, I made the decision to cancel the SRL2R and exit those markets.

There is no replacement for the QS1R in the works.

Regards,
Phil N8VB



Phil,

Would you ever consider publishing the QS1R as an Open Source type of project? The QS1R works so well for CW and RTTY skimmer nodes.
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N8VB
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Posts: 23


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« Reply #10 on: January 19, 2018, 10:48:13 AM »

Hello all,

Thanks for inquiring about the QS1R.

The QS1R is now out of production permanently.  

I was working on a replacement called the SRL2R, which ran embedded Linux and had both Ethernet and USB connectivity (as well as WiFi).  The prototype was completed and demonstrated in March of 2015.  

After selling two QS1R receivers and two QS1E exciters to a particular Japanese Ham who happened to work for a particular Japanese company (who produces Amateur Radios in addition to commercial radios), the ICOM IC-7300 and IC-R8600 radios were born (whose internal construction were strikingly similar to the QS1R and QS1E).  At that time, after evaluating the SWL and HAM market for SDR Receivers, I made the decision to cancel the SRL2R and exit those markets.

There is no replacement for the QS1R in the works.

Regards,
Phil N8VB



Phil,

Would you ever consider publishing the QS1R as an Open Source type of project? The QS1R works so well for CW and RTTY skimmer nodes.

I would consider selling the complete IP if someone is interested.

73 Phil
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I4LEC
Member

Posts: 15




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« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2018, 10:55:43 AM »

 At that time, after evaluating the SWL and HAM market for SDR Receivers, I made the decision to cancel the SRL2R and exit those markets.

Why not to share it with an other Japanese Ham who happened to work for another Japanese company who produces Amateur Radios ? Embarrassed

73, Clay

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KE2TR
Member

Posts: 655




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« Reply #12 on: January 21, 2018, 07:45:27 PM »

I find this post interesting and amusing in the fact that some Japanese ham who just happened to work for a amateur radio manufacturer ended up with these sdr radio prototypes then all of a sudden 9 months to a year latter this company ended up with a design strikingly similar then the original designer ended his entrance into this marketplace after his ground breaking design. What I find more amazing is that this Japanese company wrote code for something they may not have designed in first place within a year.
Just maybe that company contracted the original designer so they would not have to get involved in a huge R&D project and they had this designer sign a non compete clause with the marketplace and also could not take credit for the design as well. In the real world this happens more than you may know but if the later is true I just hope the designer was well compensated but we will never know.
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W3RSW
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Posts: 546




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« Reply #13 on: Yesterday at 04:43:24 PM »


Some research into the HPSDR program. Phil’s (n8vb) early contribution to that project and subsequent branching out on his own may help to explain all the architectural similarities of the LTC 2208 ADC followed by FPGA based SDR’s; similarly for the DAC, etc. Xmit upside.

 His earlier blogs explained why he left the HPSDR program as well as a lot of philosophy of the open front end of the QS1R, (up to the clipping threshold of the LTC-2208 coupled with the need for preamplification only above 18 MHz for the average user and potential unrestricted test instrument use. ).   Sorry some of these blogs are gone.  Delving into the still existing HPSDR SVN will also show Phil’s contributions.

Phil also sold aQS1R to Flex before they quit producing a sound card based SDR and before they produced the DDC / FPGA 6000 series.  He also bought A 6300 in reciprocal elan from them later on. —Very gentlemanly of him I thought.  I’m sure he was curious about their progress; he’s never disparaged Flex to my knowledge.

I also have to believe Phil’s comments on perhaps the similar Icom buss and logic direction lines. Possibly almost direct copies, on say the receive side, up to Icom’s restricted bandwidth detection of the IQ stream using their earlier digital software.

I have the QS1R Rec C and D schematics as well as the Hermès : now I’ll be very  interested in comparing with the Icom.  The board layout lines, clocks, buffers, Software filters and even connectors might be interesting too.
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Rick, W3RSW
W3RSW
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Posts: 546




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« Reply #14 on: Yesterday at 06:04:42 PM »

e.g.,
http://openhpsdr.org/svn_archive/N8VB/

Archive file date 2009 of N8VB’s work done times and years earlier.

The QS1R was hardly a prototype. Sales were in the hundreds I believe and was an established, premium DDC SDR while Flex was still selling sound card based 1500’s and 5000’s.  My first Rev. C was bought in 2008.  Phil’s server and SDR Max GUI included an always running (if selected) DC to 62.5 MHz complete spectrum along with a chosen ham sub band.

« Last Edit: Yesterday at 06:23:04 PM by W3RSW » Logged

Rick, W3RSW
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