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Author Topic: its only a hobby untill...  (Read 5551 times)
KC9PWT
Member

Posts: 86




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« on: October 17, 2017, 12:31:35 PM »

yes i know emcomm is for the professionals, i say it is only a hobby until it is not, it is like practicing with your firearms, playing with your radios,  and a lot of other things we like to do.  it is a hobby until you are cut off in Puerto Rico, or us virgin islands, in the middle of a hurricane with no power and no sat phone, or the red cross or salvation army needs radio operator to handle traffic.  so i say i agree it is only a hobby until it is not.

alex
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NA4IT
Member

Posts: 43


WWW

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« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2017, 03:04:30 PM »

FCC Part 97.1   Basis and purpose.

The rules and regulations in this part are designed to provide an amateur radio service having a fundamental purpose as expressed in the following principles:

(a) Recognition and enhancement of the value of the amateur service to the public as a voluntary noncommercial communication service, particularly with respect to providing emergency communications.

(b) Continuation and extension of the amateur's proven ability to contribute to the advancement of the radio art.

(c) Encouragement and improvement of the amateur service through rules which provide for advancing skills in both the communication and technical phases of the art.

(d) Expansion of the existing reservoir within the amateur radio service of trained operators, technicians, and electronics experts.

(e) Continuation and extension of the amateur's unique ability to enhance international goodwill.
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W7ASA
Member

Posts: 459




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« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2017, 06:45:31 PM »

Exactly.

Thank you for posting.

73 de Ray ...-  .-
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PLANKEYE
Member

Posts: 212




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« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2017, 02:17:46 PM »

Well I think we need to tighten the testing and ENFORCEMENT OF RULES up quite a bit to get and keep your license before we start helping in emergency situations.  That is common sense.  Like when you call 911 you don't want a mall cop to show up right?  What I hear on the air is pretty CB like and I don't think most people would want help from folks I hear on the air.  If you think it is more than a hobby you are wrong.  It's not professional radio.  It's only a hobby.       
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PLANKEYE
Member

Posts: 212




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« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2017, 02:41:48 PM »

This is from hamtestonline. 

How long does it take?

    Depending on your background and memory, most students pass easily after:
        10 study hours for the Technician class (entry-level) license exam.
        20 study hours for the General class license exam.
        30 study hours for the Extra class license exam.



Pretty easy to get that license in your hands isn't it? 
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N0YXB
Member

Posts: 1121




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« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2017, 02:50:43 PM »

You know absolutely nothing about emergency communications.
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PLANKEYE
Member

Posts: 212




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« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2017, 03:05:10 PM »

I may not know much about emergency communication but what do you know about it?  Please help all of us out that don't know. 
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PLANKEYE
Member

Posts: 212




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« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2017, 04:00:36 PM »

What in the world is this? 


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C86gxXIhvFY
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PLANKEYE
Member

Posts: 212




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« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2017, 04:27:26 PM »

These are the folks that are going to help you in a emergency situation?  The FCC needs to enforce rules or give the license away.  And then look away like they have been doing.  It's just a hobby folks get over it.       


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uwiB0oJabtg
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N9AOP
Member

Posts: 641




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« Reply #9 on: October 18, 2017, 04:39:34 PM »

I have said this before and I will say it again.  There is a need for trained hams for emcomm.  The trained part is the hard part.  At a major event you will find hams coming out of the woodwork.  However, when you try to recruit them before hand and ask them to join in a training event once a quarter or to come to a monthly meeting to offer their service and suggestions to the ARES group, very few show up.  Here in northeastern Illinois a big event occurs only every few years--not enough to keep up the interest of most hams unlike some other parts of the country.  An unknown and  questionable trained individual was acceptable in 1990 but not today. 
Art
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N8AUC
Member

Posts: 314




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« Reply #10 on: October 18, 2017, 08:39:48 PM »

I have said this before and I will say it again.  There is a need for trained hams for emcomm.  The trained part is the hard part.  At a major event you will find hams coming out of the woodwork.  However, when you try to recruit them before hand and ask them to join in a training event once a quarter or to come to a monthly meeting to offer their service and suggestions to the ARES group, very few show up.  Here in northeastern Illinois a big event occurs only every few years--not enough to keep up the interest of most hams unlike some other parts of the country.  An unknown and  questionable trained individual was acceptable in 1990 but not today.  
Art
This is exactly correct.

If you're not trained in, and familiar with NIMS/ICS you aren't going to be very useful, needed, or wanted.
If "joe ricky ham" off the street shows up with a belt full of HTs and none of the training, thinking he's
going to save the day, well he is going to be quite disappointed when he is sent home. No matter how
many orange vests he has, or how big a light bar he put on his vehicle. Truthfully, a light bar on a
personal vehicle is a usually (but not always) a good indicator of the much ridiculed "whacker". The
world changed after 9/11, and again after Katrina. Things are NOT like they used to be.

The people you're going to be working with live and breathe NIMS and ICS every day on the job.
If you haven't taken the training, you aren't going to know what the operational structure of the
response is, or how you are expected to fit in. And you aren't going to be able to work within the
system. Therefore you will be useless to the agencies we serve.

Truthfully, if everything works like it's supposed to, we aren't going to be called. And that's OK.
But when we are called, it's because we really are needed. It doesn't happen
often, but when it does, and it has, an organized response of trained individuals is what is needed.
That is where a good ARES unit comes into play. If your county EC is doing his job properly, he and
his staff of AECs are working to build (and maintain) a good working relationship with the agencies
they serve. Usually this will be the local county Office of Emergency Management (EMA). The ARES
leadership, under direction of local EMA officials, and your section level ARRL leadership will encourage
taking the necessary training. They will also facilitate drills and exercises to practice the response
expected by the served agencies, and the skills and capabilities the served agencies need. They should
also be conducting regular monthly meetings, each with training on a topic that is applicable to providing
emergency communications. If none of this is happening where you live, then either someone isn't
doing their job, or you do not have a properly functioning (or any) ARES unit in your county.

Art is 100% right. There IS a need for TRAINED hams for emcomm.

The required NIMS/ICS training is all online, and provided at no cost to the student. Yet some people
steadfastly refuse to spend (or make such elaborate excuses to avoid) a few hours to take the
necessary training. And the material really isn't that difficult. These are the same people who usually
can't be bothered to participate in the drills or exercises either. And they are also the ones who will
show up on websites and message boards as "internet experts" who loudly proclaim how "ham radio
emcomm" is a sad joke. And that simply is NOT the truth.

73 de N8AUC
Eric
(District EC in Ohio)
« Last Edit: October 18, 2017, 08:53:27 PM by N8AUC » Logged
KF7CG
Member

Posts: 1192




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« Reply #11 on: October 19, 2017, 11:09:21 AM »

Right on Eric. I am fortunate enough to be able to participate with a well organized ARES group in middle Tennessee. We have solid relationships with the local law enforcement and EMA/EMS entities in our area. Maybe too much of a relationship, a larger emergency would pull many of our leadership people into their primary function as first responders and emergency services.

The other item that is often overlooked is that with a large and vital amateur community, it is more likely to have someone at the right place at the right time when someone calling for help needs an answer. I was fortunate enough to have been that person once. Heard a distress call, didn't have quite the equipment to cover it myself, passed it to a friend with a better station. He was able to provide the initial liaison between a vessel in trouble in the Gulf of Mexico and the Coast Guard who were not able to her the vessel on their equipment. Bottom line, amateur on the air to chase DX, hears a call for help and has enough training to know how and whom to pass the call to and fortunate for all a possible tragedy is avoided.

Ham radio is only a hobby until it isn't. Will you be prepared for when it isn't?

David
KF7CG
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KC9PWT
Member

Posts: 86




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: October 19, 2017, 03:00:09 PM »

david,
i am trying to get there,there is a lot to learn, i wish that there was an after action report from the folks that went to Puerto Rico so we could identify what skills would be most valuable to have.  and we could get a head start given that it is  when not if there will be a need for operators.

alex
kc9pwt
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KC9PWT
Member

Posts: 86




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: October 19, 2017, 07:24:22 PM »

I have said this before and I will say it again.  There is a need for trained hams for emcomm.  The trained part is the hard part.  At a major event you will find hams coming out of the woodwork.  However, when you try to recruit them before hand and ask them to join in a training event once a quarter or to come to a monthly meeting to offer their service and suggestions to the ARES group, very few show up.  Here in northeastern Illinois a big event occurs only every few years--not enough to keep up the interest of most hams unlike some other parts of the country.  An unknown and  questionable trained individual was acceptable in 1990 but not today.  
Art
This is exactly correct.

If you're not trained in, and familiar with NIMS/ICS you aren't going to be very useful, needed, or wanted.
If "joe ricky ham" off the street shows up with a belt full of HTs and none of the training, thinking he's
going to save the day, well he is going to be quite disappointed when he is sent home. No matter how
many orange vests he has, or how big a light bar he put on his vehicle. Truthfully, a light bar on a
personal vehicle is a usually (but not always) a good indicator of the much ridiculed "whacker". The
world changed after 9/11, and again after Katrina. Things are NOT like they used to be.

The people you're going to be working with live and breathe NIMS and ICS every day on the job.
If you haven't taken the training, you aren't going to know what the operational structure of the
response is, or how you are expected to fit in. And you aren't going to be able to work within the
system. Therefore you will be useless to the agencies we serve.

Truthfully, if everything works like it's supposed to, we aren't going to be called. And that's OK.
But when we are called, it's because we really are needed. It doesn't happen
often, but when it does, and it has, an organized response of trained individuals is what is needed.
That is where a good ARES unit comes into play. If your county EC is doing his job properly, he and
his staff of AECs are working to build (and maintain) a good working relationship with the agencies
they serve. Usually this will be the local county Office of Emergency Management (EMA). The ARES
leadership, under direction of local EMA officials, and your section level ARRL leadership will encourage
taking the necessary training. They will also facilitate drills and exercises to practice the response
expected by the served agencies, and the skills and capabilities the served agencies need. They should
also be conducting regular monthly meetings, each with training on a topic that is applicable to providing
emergency communications. If none of this is happening where you live, then either someone isn't
doing their job, or you do not have a properly functioning (or any) ARES unit in your county.

Art is 100% right. There IS a need for TRAINED hams for emcomm.

The required NIMS/ICS training is all online, and provided at no cost to the student. Yet some people
steadfastly refuse to spend (or make such elaborate excuses to avoid) a few hours to take the
necessary training. And the material really isn't that difficult. These are the same people who usually
can't be bothered to participate in the drills or exercises either. And they are also the ones who will
show up on websites and message boards as "internet experts" who loudly proclaim how "ham radio
emcomm" is a sad joke. And that simply is NOT the truth.

73 de N8AUC
Eric
(District EC in Ohio)

eric,
is there a curriculum for emcomm, if not maybe that would be an interesting program to have for folks to improve skills on their own .  how to run the nets , what modes worked well in Puerto Rico and what things can be improved on.  i hope an honest AAR with some items that need improvement and this should include fema and arc so that more cohesive bonds can be established.  continuous quality improvement should be a goal.  like we do in trauma centers and mass casualty events.  we have 50 folks that worked there and we need to gather what worked and what dis not, incorporating fema and ARC and salvation army into the program, this would demonstrate ARRL's commitment to forging a bridge with the other major responders to become more integrated in response. along with a training program to demonstrate our willingness to provide communications as needed.

alex
kc9pwt
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PLANKEYE
Member

Posts: 212




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: October 21, 2017, 01:10:42 PM »

N9AOP

I have said this before and I will say it again.  There is a need for trained hams for emcomm.  The trained part is the hard part.  At a major event you will find hams coming out of the woodwork.  However, when you try to recruit them before hand and ask them to join in a training event once a quarter or to come to a monthly meeting to offer their service and suggestions to the ARES group, very few show up.  Here in northeastern Illinois a big event occurs only every few years--not enough to keep up the interest of most hams unlike some other parts of the country.  An unknown and  questionable trained individual was acceptable in 1990 but not today.
Art


_____________------------------


PLANKEYE


I have said this before and I will say it again.  The testing to get the license should be very hard.  Once you obtain your license and want to be involved in emergency type stuff that training should be very hard.  I don't think it mixes very well though.  The license is easy to obtain and anyone can pass extra but then you expect them to react in a emergency situation?  I have heard enough rednecks on the air and this hobby is just CB radio with no training and no enforcement of rules.  A hobby is one thing and a simple ragchew is great, but if you have someone who has a emergency on the air you better know what your doing and get off that scotch whiskey.     
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