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Author Topic: its only a hobby untill...  (Read 5778 times)
N8AUC
Member

Posts: 315




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« Reply #30 on: October 23, 2017, 08:08:55 PM »


I tried to tell you that but then you talk about these cook outs and got me into that.  Other people talk about getting rid of the test all together because of no enforcement from the FCC.  You flip flopped on me and now I'm not sure what to believe or think regarding radio anymore.  Talk more about your cook outs.  

This one ought to get ya!

This coming weekend we have a 3 night event called "Pumpkin Patrol".
Which sounds kinda corny on the surface. Except it's really not.

This is the 55th year that ARES has volunteered in support of the
Ohio Highway Patrol to watch freeway overpasses. Sort of extra eyes and
ears for the State Troopers. The job is simply to observe and report.
Net control is in the local Highway Patrol Post.

Back in 1961, some teenagers tossed a stolen pumpkin off of an overpass
on the Ohio Turnpike. The pumpkin struck a car passing under that overpass,
scoring a direct hit on the windshield. It killed the driver instantly, who was
a mother of 3 kids, and the wreck that resulted from the loss of vehicle
control seriously injured the kids too.

Ever since, beginning in 1962, at the request of the Highway Patrol, we
deploy to assigned spots to watch bridges over the Turnpike and other
freeway overpasses, to prevent such a thing from happening again in this
area. It hasn't happened since.

If everything goes well, it's a boring evening.

The highlight, is when the chili wagon stops at each deployed location to
deliver a steaming hot cup of some of the best chili I've ever eaten to the
hams volunteering to perform this service. It's not exactly a cook out, but
the chili is fantastic! Some of the hams say they come out for pumpkin
patrol just for the chili.

« Last Edit: October 23, 2017, 08:14:36 PM by N8AUC » Logged
KC9PWT
Member

Posts: 86




Ignore
« Reply #31 on: October 23, 2017, 09:19:01 PM »

plankeye you must be one hungry monster Grin Grin

alex
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PLANKEYE
Member

Posts: 212




Ignore
« Reply #32 on: October 24, 2017, 03:34:39 PM »



This one ought to get ya!

This coming weekend we have a 3 night event called "Pumpkin Patrol".
Which sounds kinda corny on the surface. Except it's really not.

This is the 55th year that ARES has volunteered in support of the
Ohio Highway Patrol to watch freeway overpasses. Sort of extra eyes and
ears for the State Troopers. The job is simply to observe and report.
Net control is in the local Highway Patrol Post.

Back in 1961, some teenagers tossed a stolen pumpkin off of an overpass
on the Ohio Turnpike. The pumpkin struck a car passing under that overpass,
scoring a direct hit on the windshield. It killed the driver instantly, who was
a mother of 3 kids, and the wreck that resulted from the loss of vehicle
control seriously injured the kids too.

Ever since, beginning in 1962, at the request of the Highway Patrol, we
deploy to assigned spots to watch bridges over the Turnpike and other
freeway overpasses, to prevent such a thing from happening again in this
area. It hasn't happened since.

If everything goes well, it's a boring evening.

The highlight, is when the chili wagon stops at each deployed location to
deliver a steaming hot cup of some of the best chili I've ever eaten to the
hams volunteering to perform this service. It's not exactly a cook out, but
the chili is fantastic! Some of the hams say they come out for pumpkin
patrol just for the chili.


__________________________

PLANKEYE

Ok you got me I admit it.  Sometimes all of us get a little to critical about how things should be regarding ham radio and I apologize.  When you have something that horrific happen the Police need all the help they can get to make sure it DOES NOT happen again regardless of testing ETC...  I could not imagine what that was like for the family back in 1961 but I'm glad you are helping NOW so it doesn't happen again.  I hope everything goes well and it's a boring evening and enjoy the chili!!  Thank you for what you are doing Eric and keep up the good work!!!! 
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W9FIB
Member

Posts: 2097




Ignore
« Reply #33 on: October 24, 2017, 06:45:36 PM »

I had the fortune to be a member of our local volunteer fire department. Something I came away with is that their are 3 kinds of volunteers. And also as a member of the local ARES, the description fits as well.

First group are the dedicated. They learn everything they can from those around them and participate in training and drills. They take an active role in the mundane to excel in the call. When they are told to roll up the hose for the 500th time, they still do it with pride. These are the ones that eventually ride in the captains seat. A position that is earned, not handed to them. And even then most will never make that seat. But they will become a very valuable member and find their best job and do it with pride. These are also the ones you see running into a burning building while everyone else is running away.

Then there are the half hearted. They occasionally show up to drill or train. They will sometimes do the mundane after being coaxed into it. But their not very happy doing that cause they can only see themselves in the captains seat. And more often than not, can be seen standing around at the scene not doing much or giving useless advice to each other that neither of them actually follow up on. Some do see the light in time and move to the ranks of the dedicated. Unfortunately, not many.

The last group is the wannabes. They volunteer with great hopes of being that captain by the end of their first meeting. They hang in there just long enough that they get a pager, gear, and an assignment. And poof! They are gone. Until the pager goes off. Then they risk their lives (and others) to get to the station, have no clue what to do when they get there, and start telling everyone what to do and how great it was he/she showed up to take charge. These usually don't last long because they don't put in the effort to actually be a member of the crew. And are usually ignored because of the poor attitude. Unfortunately, until they finally do give up, they tend to be in the way, and are more of a problem then they are any kind of help.

Now with that said, I understand that not everyone can be a firefighter. Just as not everyone wants to do EMCOMM. And that's fine. In the right situations, both can be a tough job. And for what ever reason, if you know you can't do it, or just have no desire to do it, then yes, it's better to sit on the sideline and watch. No shame from me for taking an honest stance.

But we ask you all to remember 1 thing. It's not for glory, fame, or even high 5s. It is what we want to do. It is why we put in the time, effort, and training...because for us, what is important is just doing the job we are needed for.

If we are never needed...life is good. But if...then there we are.
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Happy being an Amateur Extra!
Nothing says CB on my printed license.
Ares/Races but no lights or crown vic.
PLANKEYE
Member

Posts: 212




Ignore
« Reply #34 on: October 31, 2017, 03:52:12 PM »

Hey Eric N8AUC check out the new article on the front page of E-Ham.  You might want to share your story.  Just a thought.   
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