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Author Topic: Good power supply for Yaesu FT-450D?  (Read 3157 times)
KE2KB
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Posts: 633




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« on: October 21, 2017, 11:07:17 AM »

Hi;
I just bought an almost bran-new Yaesu FT-450D on Ebay, and now need a 13.5V power supply for it.
I've been doing some research on this, and read a lot about the "Mega-Watt" or "MegaWatt" (whichever way you want to spell it I assume it's the same thing we're talking about) units that are available on Ebay bran-new for under $70.

I read about some problems with these supplies in the reviews here on eHam.net. One was that a splash of solder caused the + output to be shorted to the chassis, and causing terrible RFI. That was an easy fix - but may have voided the user's warranty - a repair I would not have hesitated to make myself on a bran-new unit.
Another review said that the supply caused enough RFI on 160m to make that band unusable.

So that is the main question: Can I truse one of these Mega-Watt supplies, or should I opt for something else (and more expensive). I had been looking at an Alinco DM-330MVT for $159.95 on HRO. That supply could double as a bench supply since its output is adjustable from 5-15V. But do I need to spend that much on a good power supply for the rig?

If I do opt for the Mega-Watt, then which one?
Should I get the S-350-12 rated at 33A max (not sure what the continuous rating is), or spend another $9 and get the model S-400-12 rated at 36A max/30A continuous?
I suppose that if I choose the higher wattage unit, I could also power my 2m HT's from it, as well as some other gear while I'm running CW on the Yaesu at full output.

I suppose that the supply rated for higher power will run cooler.
My feeling is go for the 400W for an extra $9.

So what ya think?

Thanks
Frank - KE2KB
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KA1VF
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Posts: 129




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« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2017, 12:54:04 PM »

   Frank, my HF rig is the Yaesu FT-450AT that I bought new from HRO in March of 2008,
             and my power supply is the Jetstream model# JTPS28 which also powers a Yaesu
             FT-1500M two meter rig.

             note: I bought that JTPS28 used on the Internet for $ 49.50, and I liked it so much
                      that I bought a new JTPS28 from R & L Electronics for $ 79.95 as a spare.


                      73,
                           Bob

 
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KE2KB
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Posts: 633




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« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2017, 01:15:59 PM »

   Frank, my HF rig is the Yaesu FT-450AT that I bought new from HRO in March of 2008,
             and my power supply is the Jetstream model# JTPS28 which also powers a Yaesu
             FT-1500M two meter rig.

             note: I bought that JTPS28 used on the Internet for $ 49.50, and I liked it so much
                      that I bought a new JTPS28 from R & L Electronics for $ 79.95 as a spare.


                      73,
                           Bob

 
Thanks Bob;
I've also read some good reviews and recommendations of the JetStream. I will put that one on my short list.
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KE2KB
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Posts: 633




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« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2017, 01:38:19 PM »

Did some reading of reviews on the JetStream JTPS28 here on eHam. Seems like the only issue is the fan noise. That probably wouldn't be a problem for me, since my computer has a pretty loud fan.
But there was one reviewer who said that the fan is mounted off-horizontal, so it causes excess wear on the bearing. I never knew that was an issue for cooling fans. My computer has one mounted vertically, and one mounted horizontally (not including the fan on the graphics board).
I suppose that replacing the fan with a ball bearing model would solve the problem. Not really something I would be overly concerned about. My house is anything but quiet - with the computer fans, the other family members, and the constant road noise from outside when windows are open. Besides that, I always wear headphones while operating my radio and sound equipment.

The one thing I found very helpful with the reviews is that no one complained about RF hash.

Thinking about it; I am more likely to go with something like the JetStream than the "Ebay only" Mega-Watt. It's not that I don't trust the Ebay seller, but why would someone build power supplies that are so great, and only sell them on Ebay? Reminds me of those "Seen-On-TV" ads we have all seen too many of.
But maybe I'm not being fair. I will continue to read reviews before I make my decision. I should have the FT-450D by next Saturday, but I can always run it from my car before I get a power supply. Matter of fact, I have a connection in the coax from my 40m dipole for the lightning protector right at the driveway, so I could part my car next to it, run a length of RG-8X from the arrestor to the rig, and run a length of #12/2 Romex from the battery terminals (with a fuse of course) to the rig for power.
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WA3SKN
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Posts: 6495




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« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2017, 01:56:36 PM »

Get a supply that can supply at least 25 amps output, then you can use it on other radios later on.  I prefer having meters so that I can see the voltage and current output.  Also I prefer ones that a least mention the expected ripple and noise.  Most hams do not have an easy way to check for noise problems.  And fan noise can be a problem on some supplies also.  I have seen prices on those Megawatt units and they are only a good buy if they work well... and I have not used or tested one.  I have thought about getting one to test, though.
I can recommend the SEC1235M, but it is not $70!
73s.

-Mike.

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N9AOP
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Posts: 641




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« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2017, 02:32:28 PM »

I have had a JTPS-28 for a few  years now and it works fine.  I believe I paid $70 for it.  Use it on weekends in the camper.  For the price it has been a good unit.
Art
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K2OWK
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Posts: 1273




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« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2017, 03:02:00 PM »

I have been using a Megawatt 30 amp power supply I bought off EBay about 5 years ago, on my Yaesu FT-450AT with no problems. I would suggest that you completely test any power supply you buy before connecting it to your transceiver.

Hope this helps,

73s

K2OWK
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K0UA
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Posts: 1348




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« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2017, 03:27:08 PM »

Call me old fashioned, but I hate switching power supplies.  Yes, I have a house full of them, and they all suck.  They all emit RFI, and I have spent time and money on chokes trying to quiet them down.  Let alone a supply for a ham rig.  Some switching supplies have adjustment knobs so you can move the offending spurious signals  away from your current frequency.  How convenient.  By definition they emit spurious signals.

No, nothing for me but old fashioned heavy linear supplies.  I have the Astron 35m and an old Triplite of some flavor. Both over 30 amps and both linear.   I have looked at the switching supplies, and the lure of small size, light weight, and then I think of the trash that they will emit and think better.  Why raise the already high noise floor in your installation even further?  Trust me you will spend the rest of your life evaluating every battery charger, light bulb, and electronic kitchen and laundry appliance you bring into your own home  from now on.  Both from the RFI it will emit and the RFI it will be susceptible to.  So why spend money and sabotage your own radio installation with a switching power supply?  Linear supplies are still available. That is all I will have.

Amateur radio HF operation is almost  "done in" as it is.  With HOA's and the rise of switching power supplies in the form of every electronic personal device and every piece of home equipment from dishwashers to furnaces.  We are fighting a losing battle, and losing ground every day.  If you are going to fight the fight, don't cozy up with the enemy right out of the gate.  The age of the mechanical appliance timer and the linear supply are numbered.  Can you think of anything new that doesn't have a microprocessor and a switching power supply in it?  These are all enemies of Amateur HF radio operation. Oh sure you can quiet them down and beat them back, but every thing you buy new must be evaluated before you bring it in, or you will hear the "buzz"

Ideally you would always install your antennas at LEAST 100 foot from you home and high in the air to get away from your own generated hash, and ideally your nearest neighbor would be 1/4 mile away at a minimum.  But this is not reality for 99 percent of us any more.  I know, I am an old curmudgeon, but I remember the way things "used to be".  And trust me from a ham radio perspective, they were a lot better.
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KE2KB
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Posts: 633




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« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2017, 04:50:32 PM »

K0UA; I read you 5x9 on the RfI. I guess the DSP on today's rigs will help somewhat, but I am going to take your advice and research linear supplies.
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KC4ZGP
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Posts: 1637




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« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2017, 05:03:50 PM »


I recommend Astron RS-35 or RS-50 power supplies. They are linear supplies
not switching supplies.

Anytime something switches, noise results. Not sure how much.

It's like grounding systems. We know it helps just don't know how much.

Kraus
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KE2KB
Member

Posts: 633




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« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2017, 05:44:42 PM »


I recommend Astron RS-35 or RS-50 power supplies. They are linear supplies
not switching supplies.

Anytime something switches, noise results. Not sure how much.

It's like grounding systems. We know it helps just don't know how much.

Kraus
Found some Astron RS-35, RS-35M, and RS-50 on Ebay.
If you had to buy one of these, which would you get?

RS-35M new-open box: $160 including shipping
RS-35M used: bidding at $60 (buy it now $82) + $35 shipping, Description reads "Powers up volt indicator goes up not tested as is"
RS-50A used: $160 including shipping; Description:  "Astron RS-50A Power Supply" nothing about working or not.

I can message the seller to get more info, but I am leaning towards the new-open box unit.
I like the meters, and really don't think I need 50 Amps.... then again...

Do all of the Astron RS models have the OV protection? This is obviously very important.
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AC2EU
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« Reply #11 on: October 21, 2017, 06:24:59 PM »

I have the original FT450AT and I bought a Kenwood KPS-15 switching supply tp go with it.
Kenwood's supply was a bit less expensive than Yaesu's, but I wanted one from  a "radio company" to be more likely to have RFI issues addressed. No problems with RFI at all and  it has no fan to make noise, electrical or otherwise.

There is nothing to fear with a WELL DESIGNED switch mode supply. 
However, you're on your own with some of the cheap stuff.
SMPS are much smaller, more efficient and lighter than the old linear types.

Switch mode supplies are everywhere these days. They are in LED lights, CFL lights, computers, TV's and just about anything that needs power conversion!
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KE2KB
Member

Posts: 633




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« Reply #12 on: October 21, 2017, 06:46:05 PM »

I have the original FT450AT and I bought a Kenwood KPS-15 switching supply tp go with it.
Kenwood's supply was a bit less expensive than Yaesu's, but I wanted one from  a "radio company" to be more likely to have RFI issues addressed. No problems with RFI at all and  it has no fan to make noise, electrical or otherwise.

There is nothing to fear with a WELL DESIGNED switch mode supply. 
However, you're on your own with some of the cheap stuff.
SMPS are much smaller, more efficient and lighter than the old linear types.

Switch mode supplies are everywhere these days. They are in LED lights, CFL lights, computers, TV's and just about anything that needs power conversion!
You have a point. A supply designed by a radio company would be much more "usable" than one designed for the bench. That said, I have no switching bench supplies at this time. All I've got is the old Lambda 12V @ 10A, and an old Lambda 5V @ 15A - both linear, and a Heathkit "Tri Power Supply" that I need to "re-cap" due to its age.

I will take all the suggestions you guys have given me and do some more research before I buy anything.
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KE2KB
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Posts: 633




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« Reply #13 on: October 21, 2017, 07:01:01 PM »

On a slight tangent to this thread:
I read or was advised by someone that the power supply should NOT have its negative terminal bonded to chassis/earth ground, and should have a dedicated ground to earth from the chassis.
By dedicated, does that mean I need to run a second #6 ground conductor from my shack to the ground rod? Completely separate from the radio's GC?
Or can I simply plug the supply's 3-wire grounding power cord into a grounding receptacle and have it grounded only to the house electrical?

While I can run a second #6 conductor from the shack to the GR, I will need to separate the two running down the side of the house so that they don't touch  together.
I currently have just one #6 conductor running from the GR (ground rod) to a "neutral bus" connector mounted next to my rig. This conductor is bare copper, so running a second one means a new hole in the wall, or insulation over both where they go through the wall.
I do not have a ground plate anywhere - which I know is the best method of grounding a radio station, but that isn't really an option for me at this point.
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KD9FRQ
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Posts: 174




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« Reply #14 on: October 22, 2017, 05:27:17 AM »

I use a 45amp RV Power supply.

It charges my backup batteries and feeds my 2009 FT-450 and FT-7900 (on in receive mode almost all the time). I will be adding a FT-3200 to the mix when I complete my PiGate RMS WinLink system.
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