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Author Topic: a network of noise monitors, sort of like the Reverse Beacon Network  (Read 1358 times)
W3TTT
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« on: November 03, 2017, 07:50:59 AM »

I think it would be a worthwhile project to organize a network of noise monitors, sort of like the Reverse Beacon Network, but for RFI.  It would be informative if the noise could be "located", and logged. 

The reason is that there seems to be some high powered RFI on many bands.  People on my net all hear it across the entire eastern US.  A network of noise monitors could locate the noise. 

Any thoughts?

W3TTT Joe
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KE2KB
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« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2017, 05:07:55 PM »

I've been suspecting that for a while. I often hear / see noise spikes on 40m at 40Khz intervals, which seem to vary in intensity with daylight. Either the noise is local and diminishes as daylight wans, or it is distant and being propagated. I had suggested that my noise is from solar panels, but then I was reminded that solar panels themselves produce DC current, so it would have to be the attached chargers and inverters that are producing the noise.

A network of noise monitoring stations could be created fairly easily using Web-SDR stations. There are only a few that I have listened to, but I can often hear the same noise on those stations as I hear at my QTH.
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WB4SPT
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« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2017, 07:18:05 AM »

It would seem that the "monitor" part is easy.  Ask the net for the S meter readings.  Its the source location, that will be the technical challenge.  If you could get folks with 40m beams thruout the country to get a max strength bearing on the noise, and you have that data countywide, that would be the ticket.  If everyone on the eastern seaboard found the source was "East", that would be telling! 
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KM1H
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« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2017, 07:11:16 AM »

That is done regularly on 160 by the uber serious CW DX operators who can do a very good job at triangularization.

Carl
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W3TTT
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« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2017, 01:38:33 PM »

Instead of directional antennas, I was thinking of a network of stations with unidirectional antennas, which would monitor multiple frequencies, and report on noise level at each location.  Noise sources could be located by mapping the station reports. 
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WB4SPT
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« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2017, 09:50:19 AM »

Instead of directional antennas, I was thinking of a network of stations with unidirectional antennas, which would monitor multiple frequencies, and report on noise level at each location.  Noise sources could be located by mapping the station reports. 

I would think for 40m, this would be problematic.  You have the following variables, all conspiring to cause issues.   Skywave vs groundwave modes; antenna patterns; fading, and the common use of S meters.  Triangulation should work. 
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