Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: DOD - Amateur Radio Communications Exercise 4-6 Nov 2017  (Read 9915 times)
WD8DBY
Member

Posts: 97




Ignore
« on: October 25, 2017, 01:31:00 PM »

 ZCZC AG19
 QST de W1AW   
 ARRL Bulletin 19  ARLB019
 From ARRL Headquarters   
 Newington CT  October 24, 2017
 To all radio amateurs 
 
 SB QST ARL ARLB019
 ARLB019 Communications Interoperability Training with Amateur Radio Community Set
 
 Elements of the US Department of Defense (DOD) will conduct a "communications interoperability" training exercise November 4-6, once again simulating a "very bad day" scenario. Amateur Radio and MARS organizations will take part.
 
 "This exercise will begin with a national massive coronal mass ejection event which will impact the national power grid as well as all forms of traditional communication, including landline telephone, cellphone, satellite, and Internet connectivity," Army MARS Program Manager Paul English, WD8DBY, explained in an announcement.
 
 During the exercise, a designated DOD Headquarters entity will request county-by-county status reports for the 3,143 US counties and county equivalents, in order to gain situational awareness and to determine the extent of impact of the scenario. Army and Air Force MARS organizations will work in conjunction with the Amateur Radio community, primarily on the 60-meter interoperability channels as well as on HF NVIS frequencies and local VHF and UHF, non-Internet linked Amateur Radio repeaters.
 
 Again this year, a military station on the east coast and the Fort Huachuca, Arizona, HF station will conduct a high-power broadcast on 60-meter channel 1 (5330.5 kHz) on Sunday from 0300 to 0315 UTC (Saturday evening).

 New this year will be an informational broadcast on Sunday, on  13483.5 kHz USB from 1600 to 1615 UTC (Sunday morning). Amateur Radio operators should monitor these broadcasts for more information about the exercise and how they can participate in this communications exercise, English said.
 
 "We want to continue building on the outstanding cooperative working relationship with the ARRL and the Amateur Radio community," English said. "We want to expand the use of the 60-meter interop channels between the military and amateur community for emergency communications, and we hope the Amateur Radio community will give us some good feedback on the use of both the 5-MHz interop and the new 13-MHz broadcast channels as a means of information dissemination during a very bad day scenario."
 
 Contact Paul English for more information or questions about this exercise via email at: mars.exercises@gmail.com.

 NNNN
Logged
NQ3M
Member

Posts: 47




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2017, 11:12:00 AM »

From your perspective what parts went well?
Also are there areas where improvement is needed or changes need to be made in the overall plan?
Logged
ND6M
Member

Posts: 553




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2017, 04:28:48 AM »

 I listened to this for a while on 60 meters, EVERY channel was being used for this.

Was it really necessary to completely use the entire band?

One "relay" (?) station (a KF4###) on Ch 3 came right out and said that he didn't know who he was "relaying" to, then He continued to work other stations and exchange zip codes, never once relaying any info.

Count me out.
Logged
NQ3M
Member

Posts: 47




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2017, 06:31:03 AM »

I listened to this for a while on 60 meters, EVERY channel was being used for this.
Was it really necessary to completely use the entire band?
I also heard all the channels being used but, I think it's a good idea to use them all as they were they were assigned, should a national issue arise. That way many now know (others will quickly learn), where to go, rather than wearing out the VFO.
Logged
KK4SIH
Member

Posts: 4




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2017, 09:56:00 AM »

I am not a MARS operator but I did participate.   What I would be interested in is where were the 2 stations on Saturday night (AAM3 & Desert Eagle) and who were/where were the net controls for the various channels on Saturday/Sunday located.   The other thing I did not get from the ARRL notification of the test was that checkins were being accepted all day on Saturday by MARS operators and not just after the announcements.  (I found this out as was verifying everything Saturday AM).

I did think that this was a good exercise.  Seems they should try this again next time since it appeared to have a good number of participants
Logged
N8PVW
Member

Posts: 14




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2017, 06:30:05 PM »

I started working the exercise Saturday morning and stayed in until the end. All in all well planned and well executed. Band conditions varied from miserable to fair in my area but I had no problem checking in. There were a few glitches but nothing major. During the broadcast on 13483.5 the MARS station had a loud squeal at times but was very readable. Desert Eagle was very weak but readable at my location. On the Ham side there were of course a few bad actors. The usual "frequency police" and those who would not or could not follow directions when asked not to attempt to reply to the broadcast. There also still seems to me some misunderstanding on the part of the amateur community on who owns the 5mhz channels and exactly what their purpose is. These are secondary to the amateur service and anyone not liking the fact that they are obligated to vacate a frequency immediately when asked to do so had better go re read the regs. Primary users are military and government. I have heard a lot of complaining about all 5 channels being used for the exercise. Too bad as that is the purpose of these frequencies not long winded rag chews or DXpeditions. Congrats MARS. Well done.
Logged
WD8DBY
Member

Posts: 97




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2017, 11:48:32 AM »

From your perspective what parts went well?
Also are there areas where improvement is needed or changes need to be made in the overall plan?


We are collecting after action comments now and I plan to post information about how the exercise went.

v/r

Paul
Logged
WD8DBY
Member

Posts: 97




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2017, 11:51:59 AM »

I listened to this for a while on 60 meters, EVERY channel was being used for this.

Was it really necessary to completely use the entire band?


When we did this exercise last year, we kept all communications on channel one which just caused horrible QRM.  This exercise and for the future we plan to geographically spread out the users on different channels.  By spreading out across all five channels, we can maximize the use of these channels and really maximize them for their intended purpose...interoperability between Feds, military, and the amateur radio community.

v/r

Paul
Logged
WD8DBY
Member

Posts: 97




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: November 07, 2017, 12:03:01 PM »

I am not a MARS operator but I did participate.   What I would be interested in is where were the 2 stations on Saturday night (AAM3 & Desert Eagle) and who were/where were the net controls for the various channels on Saturday/Sunday located.   The other thing I did not get from the ARRL notification of the test was that checkins were being accepted all day on Saturday by MARS operators and not just after the announcements.  (I found this out as was verifying everything Saturday AM).

I did think that this was a good exercise.  Seems they should try this again next time since it appeared to have a good number of participants

Thanks for participating!  Desert Eagle is located at Fort Huachuca, AZ.  AAM3 is a military station on the east coast.  We really didn't run any net controls on any channels. 

The way we practiced the scenario is that we did a MARS-wide announcement of the predicted CME with notification to MARS stations to go off the air and protect their equipment - unplug, disconnect, and protect for a period of time until after the CME has passed.  This equated to Saturday morning...at which point they were to begin operations automatically on 60 meters in order to begin gathering county information about how wide-spread the CME was.  The 60 meter broadcast then took place Saturday night in order to give the larger amateur radio community information about what has happened and how you can assist.  The new 13 MHz broadcast the next morning was to continue announcing the exercise and to further solicit assistance from the amateur radio community.

That's the concept anyway.

v/r

Paul

Logged
KK4SIH
Member

Posts: 4




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2017, 06:47:43 AM »

I thought the exercise was really good.   Thanks for the information about where the stations were.  Hopefully you will share lessons learned with everyone who participated.

Thanks again
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!