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Author Topic: Looking to get my first Ham Radio  (Read 5613 times)
KC4ZGP
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Posts: 1637




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« Reply #15 on: October 29, 2017, 05:33:17 AM »


Say K0UA,

Maybe I can carry my TS-450 and power supply in on of them neck basket carriers. I think
I'll need to get the guitar-sized one.

Have you seen the commercial on television advertising, 'you can tell them about a product'. Funny as heck.

Kraus
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K8AC
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Posts: 1764




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« Reply #16 on: October 29, 2017, 10:02:03 AM »

Quote
Ill get a fm/u/vhf. Ill still be able to talk around the world with that and save up for a hf radio later.

If this was a serious statement, then you need to do some more reading and better understand what you're getting into.  A VHF/UHF radio in the hands of a newcomer will enable you to talk around town or maybe around the county.  Doing more than that will require: 1- An incredible antenna system, 2- The peak of the next sunspot cycle or 3- Previously unseen miracles.
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PLANKEYE
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Posts: 212




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« Reply #17 on: October 29, 2017, 11:10:40 AM »

One overlooked rig is the Icom 7200.  Well it's not overlooked I guess look at the reviews of it on this website.  Just a thought, it costs a little more than the 718 but has a lot more to offer as well check it out.  As far a VHF/UHF those rigs are cheap some have more features ETC...  Good luck and whatever you decide I hope you enjoy it and have fun.  Oh and a lot of people talk about how important antennas are but in some cases it's mostly egos and prejudice that play into it, see link below.  Good luck.       



http://https://www.w8ji.com/g5rv_facts.htm
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KC8Y
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Posts: 467




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« Reply #18 on: October 29, 2017, 02:09:24 PM »

I have the ic-7200 and only operate CW & digital modes.  Love the filtering when using those modes.  My antenna is only a G5RV-Jr (51-ft long) and variable power 5-50 watts, BUT i use the Palstar AT1KP antenna tuner/tunes bands 40-6meters.
No problem.

Ken KC8Y
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K0UA
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Posts: 1355




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« Reply #19 on: October 29, 2017, 05:38:12 PM »

Quote
Ill get a fm/u/vhf. Ill still be able to talk around the world with that and save up for a hf radio later.

If this was a serious statement, then you need to do some more reading and better understand what you're getting into.  A VHF/UHF radio in the hands of a newcomer will enable you to talk around town or maybe around the county.  Doing more than that will require: 1- An incredible antenna system, 2- The peak of the next sunspot cycle or 3- Previously unseen miracles.

Well, actually you can "talk around the world" with just a UHF/VHF handi talkie.  Here is how.  Access a repeater that has an echolink node, and dial up the code for lets say a repeater in Australia, announce your callsign and hopefully someone down there will answer. There are nodes all over the world. Of course this requires lots of infastructure (the internet) to make it work, and isn't the same as working a VK with your own RF from point A to point B but it does work.

For that matter many linked repeater systems especially out west, do cover several states.
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K8AC
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Posts: 1764




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« Reply #20 on: October 29, 2017, 06:03:31 PM »

Or, you could just join Facebook and forget the radio crap entirely.
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PLANKEYE
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Posts: 212




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« Reply #21 on: October 29, 2017, 06:22:41 PM »

K0UA


Well, actually you can "talk around the world" with just a UHF/VHF handi talkie.  Here is how.  Access a repeater that has an echolink node, and dial up the code for lets say a repeater in Australia, announce your callsign and hopefully someone down there will answer. There are nodes all over the world. Of course this requires lots of infastructure (the internet) to make it work, and isn't the same as working a VK with your own RF from point A to point B but it does work.

For that matter many linked repeater systems especially out west, do cover several states.

___________________________________

PLANKEYE


K0UA this is HAM RADIO we are talking about.  I know you kinda blended stuff together like a cake mix but lets think before we speak.  On the internet you can do things all over the world but it is not the same as working a VK with your own RF.  Please think before you post stuff like this Damn!!
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KD8UEI
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Posts: 0




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« Reply #22 on: October 31, 2017, 04:49:02 PM »

OP:

I'd recommend that you first get your general ticket and that will open up a lot more of the HF spectrum to you. The general exam is not that much more difficult than the tech exam and you will be glad to have it.

As to your question, I had the same question and spent a lot of time going back and forth between radios until I finally realized that there is no correct answer to the question. All the radios currently on the market are capable radios. It's just a matter of what you want, i.e. your preference. Don't spend a lot of time wondering which radio is the "right" one, but get the one that your heart settles on. That way you won't regret your decision.
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KC2QYM
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Posts: 848




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« Reply #23 on: November 01, 2017, 11:06:08 AM »

This question comes up from newbies all the time.  Here's one perspective from me.  Buy the cheapest radio that works from someone you know.  This means, you should join a local radio club where a member or two may be willing to part with one of their well cared for spares. This means you will mostly score a radio that's over ten years old but that's OK.  There's nothing wrong with older, analog technology. All my radio's are older ones and I am having as much fun as I can possibly have on ham radio.  I'll give you an example: TS-820s, TS-440, TS-450, IC-756, etc.  You can look up these radios on eham. I bought them from other hams used and the most I paid was $500 each, much less for the others.  Radios like these will allow you to learn more about radio than some of the newer, intensely menu driven radios.  The Kenwood TS-820 for example is a hybrid with a solid state receiver and tube based transmitter (other models like this are the TS-520, 530, 830).  With one one of these radios you get to learn how to truly 'Operate' a radio; unless you have no interest in learning radio.  The other models mentioned all have built in antenna couplers (tuners), are solid state and provide all the operational capabilities you could ever want.  In essence, for what you can pay for a new IC-7300, you could buy three different radios from the 70s, 80's, 90's etc. Each showing different innovations through the decades.  All perfectly functional today. As a matter of fact, the longer you wait, the more radios fall into the open used market.  In my opinion, it's a buyer's market out there.  You can see how many are selling radios here on eham and those prices are usually negotiable.  For example, some guy wants $650 for a TS-440 but the most I would offer is $425 unless the guy is throwing in a power supply, mic, etc.  Good luck.
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N8YX
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Posts: 966




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« Reply #24 on: November 02, 2017, 09:20:25 AM »

...The Kenwood TS-820 for example is a hybrid with a solid state receiver and tube based transmitter (other models like this are the TS-520, 530, 830).  With one one of these radios you get to learn how to truly 'Operate' a radio; unless you have no interest in learning radio...
One of my operating positions consists of a TS-820S, R-820, SM-220/BS-8 and an SP-820. Another rests on two levels of a three-level desk and features a full FT-901DM line that's slaved to another R-820, SM-220/BS-8 and SP-820. I modded the Kenwood receiver and built a custom VFO cable to allow it to be used as an external VFO for the '901 station.

Both R-820s have been modded for additional S/W coverage over and above their stock configuration.

I use these radios a LOT. The last of the analogs are easy to listen to all day long, and they're decent enough performers that QRM isn't an issue.
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KC8KTN
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Posts: 1378


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« Reply #25 on: November 02, 2017, 01:56:57 PM »

That is what is so great about this hobby so many avenues / choices. I LOVE THIS HOBBY.Have a safe .
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WZ7U
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Posts: 571




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« Reply #26 on: November 02, 2017, 02:25:06 PM »

Have a safe .

Wall, floor or freestanding?
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================================================
WZ7U ~ originating from CN86jc +/-

Yet another imperfect being created by THE perfect God. Thank you Jesus!
N0YXB
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Posts: 1120




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« Reply #27 on: November 03, 2017, 07:29:22 AM »

Have a safe .

Safe word? I recommend billboard.   Smiley
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PLANKEYE
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Posts: 212




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« Reply #28 on: November 03, 2017, 11:17:00 AM »

KC2QYM gave some very good advice on some of the older radios in my opinion.  The older Kenwood hybrid radios are great rigs and are really fun to operate because you actually have to tune them.  Look around you may find one you like that works and is cheap.  Those older rigs work just as well as the new stuff and plus it really feels different, just more fun in my opinion.  Good luck.   
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KC8KTN
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Posts: 1378


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« Reply #29 on: November 03, 2017, 04:24:11 PM »

The Icom 7300 is about 1500 but I feel it is worth every penny.Have a great day and be safe out there.
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