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Author Topic: Rotor for Mosley TA33 Beam  (Read 786 times)
KE0FGY
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Posts: 2




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« on: November 06, 2017, 11:12:52 AM »

Want to put up a MOSLEY TA33 beam .... how much of a  rotor will be needed to swing it??  Have a CDE rotor for a large TV array; would that give good service??  Any suggestions regarding control   cable selection and installation. Probably be next summer before it can installed. start collecting the items needed fore hand. Thanks for your input. KE0FGY
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K0UA
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Posts: 1380




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« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2017, 11:36:06 AM »

In CDE rotor terms a Ham 1, 2, 3, or 4.   An AR22 is really a bit too small.  You need a brake and enough guts and ball bearings to work over the years.  You might get away with a smaller rotor, but a TA33  senior is a full size beam and will have a fair amount of wind load.  I will let you look up the wind loading on the Mosely site, and then you can go to the site of the rotor you are considering and look up the max wind loading on that as well.  This is how you size rotors to antennas.  Anything will turn it, but it is a matter of how long will it last.  Some wouldn't last a week, until the first little breeze comes along. 
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KM1H
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Posts: 2502




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« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2017, 05:47:49 PM »

Id also look at rotators that dont require an 8 conductor control cable, this isnt the 50's when the CDE's made their debut.

Carl
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AA4PB
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Posts: 14339




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« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2017, 05:59:06 PM »

I used a HAM-IV with a TA33. It was up for 33 years with the only failure being a worn bearing indicator POT needing replacement during that time. The TA33 gets whipped around in the wind quite a bit so you need a rotor with a good wedge brake to keep it from turning in the wind.
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Bob  AA4PB
Garrisonville, VA
KW6LA
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Posts: 111




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« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2017, 06:52:01 PM »

Have a TA-33 on a HD-073 rotor. Been in the air for more than 25 years. Norm's Rotors has them from time to time and the parts. Been out of production for some time. Got mine for $160.00 new and a bargain at that time.

http://www.rotorservice.com/press3-alliance.htm
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KD0ZGW
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« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2017, 07:58:09 PM »

check the rotational inertia of the beam vs. the rating for the rotor.  This is an important spec I learned about the hard when when my new tailtwister failed after 5 months even tho the antenna wind loading was only about half the rating on the rotor.
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KE2TR
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Posts: 617




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« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2017, 07:27:11 AM »

Yaesu's G450A will handle the TA33 without issue plus it has some overlap in rotation which saves on having to turn the beam around completely in some directions, those old CDE designs always have pointer issues were you have to re build them every few years.
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K6BRN
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Posts: 459




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« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2017, 09:55:45 AM »

Hi Paul:

I have a Mosley TA-33_M WARC with the TA-40-KR 40M add-on.  The antenna is turned by a Yaesu G-800-DXA, which is mast mounted, not tower mounted, using top and bottom brackets and a 1-7/8 diameter mast.  It works very well.  The G-450 is much less robust and would be marginal for the TA-33 with the WARC and 40M dipoles attached.  So no room for growth or unexpected loads with the G-450.

The G-800 SA is a slightly less expensive version of the -800 whose only compromise is a control box without an automatic "go-to" setting.

A couple of suggestions....  The TA-33s, for some reason I will never understand, come standard with 1-1/2 inch mast mounting hardware.  You need to order the 2 inch kit during purchase to use a larger diameter mast (highly recommended).  If you are using the Yaesu -800 or -1000 rotor on a mast mount, like I am, and expect a heavy load due to wind, ice or antennas mounted above the main one, then it is possible to order and attach the much stronger G-2800 rotor brackets to the -800 (GC-048 brackets and GL-33 adjustment plates).  This requires cutting a small groove in the base of the brackets with a file - easy to do - and results in a MUCH stronger mast mount.

I've also used an HD-74 in the past, and those are VERY good rotors as well, will handle the TA-33 without a problem - but are long out of production.  Norm's Rotors does a lot of work on these, but you should probably check the rotor after receiving it back (Norms ownership changed hand at one point - don't recall the details).  Last year I bought a Norm's refurbished HD-73 from a local ham who was having problems with it, at a very good price.  Upon opening, I found that the entire assembly had been nicely cleaned and the bearing races re-lubricated.  But the gear train and electric motor were completely dry, causing the rotor to squeal like crazy and move unevenly.  A small amount of lube, in just the right places, and it was back to working fine.

Regarding rotor cable, suggest you purchase a pre-connectorized cable on-line from HRO or DX Engineering for the Yaesu rotor you select.  The Yaesu rotor connectors are somewhat rare and expensive (Yaesu supplies ONE, in the box with the rotor), and buying the entire cable assembly is usually a decent deal.  I'd always recommend using high quality rotor and coax cable - prevents many problems from happening down the road.  The HD-73 rotor, on the other hand, uses screw terminals at the rotor and a readily available connector at the control box, so any good cable will do.

Good luck, have fun and don't fall (be safe),

Brian - K6BRN

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KE0FGY
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« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2017, 12:46:16 AM »

Thank you all for kind input and what to plan to be done for a serviceable installation. 73s, Paul
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G3RZP
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« Reply #9 on: November 12, 2017, 02:24:21 AM »

It is much easier to have grief and regrets by using a rotator that is too small than by justifying in your own mind why you went for overkill on the size of the rotator.

It is said that with the larger sizes of prop pitch motors in rotators that in the event of a jam, the earth will be turned under the rotator!
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K5LXP
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« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2017, 04:37:12 AM »

Whether or not you will have a thrust bearing or guy ring support above the rotor can make a big difference.  I have run some seriously undersized rotators by relieving some of the downward and lateral forces.  If the rotator is freestanding on a mast and has to both support and turn the array, then best to have some design margin.

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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KM1H
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Posts: 2502




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« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2017, 06:47:45 AM »

Quote
It is said that with the larger sizes of prop pitch motors in rotators that in the event of a jam, the earth will be turned under the rotator!

I have one of the big B-29 size out in the trailer plus a pair of selsyns for direction indicators. Never did use them for a planned rotating tower back in the 60's.
Maybe time to put it all on Fleabay.
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