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Author Topic: fldigi Morse Decoder  (Read 2093 times)
VK5EEE
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Posts: 1063




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« Reply #15 on: November 10, 2017, 12:12:25 AM »

Hi M0LEP,

Aha that's different then, thanks for clearing it up. In a class room where you are all there, indeed it is going to be of great benefit to also send and compare the sending, it will help form and reinforce characters, and the teacher can correct any problems and guide to the right way, and everyone can hear everyone and learn from others while also being able to hear differences of fists that are acceptable and thus not be stuck on "only" one precise form of keyer generated CW.

I think the problem is these days many people learn on their own at home, and there, they can develop bad habits that go uncorrected. I have one ham friend who is still unable to send his own callsign correctly, because he developed the habit over a long time, and has had no one locally able to mentor and assist to train his ear to the difference between some characters that have just one dit difference: I myself, at QRQ, sometimes wonder if I send VKHEEE or VK5EEE or VK(6 dits)EEE.

A way to train to hear the difference between B and 6, between H and 5 and between V and 4 for example are to send these sequences on your key (ideally off-air, but I've sometimes been heard doing it on air to calibrate at QRQ)  Roll Eyes

EISH5
5HSIE
EISH5HSIE
AUV4
NDB6
VVV 444
HHH 555
BBB 666

This will, at whatever speed you are capable of, enable you to "calibrate" your ear to the difference if you become uncertain.

Once someone develops a bad habit of having to COUNT the dits to send a B, 6, 4, V, 5 or H then this is a problem, as the overall SOUND needs to be heard, and this can be "calibrated" on your own by sending some of the above sequences.

Otherwise it is indeed really hard in today's socially isolated (western) world to find mentors to assist locally. There are some hams who provide an on air service, here in VK we have VK2CCW doing CW sessions a few times each week, with feedback and assistance over SSB, which has been of great help to those learning as well as increasing their speeds.

It's good you are still enjoying CW as it was a long hard effort for you and it has been for many others, all the more respect for sticking at it and enjoying this fun mode, which does not require any specific minimum speed, though I think that character speeds below 13 WPM or so could hamper the development, but, key is having FUN at whatever speed!
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever

Support CW and join CW clubs. QTT: FIST#1124, HSC#1437, UFT#728, RCWC#982, SKCC#15007, CWOPS#1714, 30CW#1,
M0LEP
Member

Posts: 491




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« Reply #16 on: November 10, 2017, 03:24:22 AM »

Used sensibly, computers may make quite good teachers' assistants, but they make poor teachers when used by themselves.

Back when I started trying to learn Morse in 2010 there weren't any actual Morse courses I could attend being run within a half-way sensible travelling distance, CWOps had barely started, and the only practical option was some kind of computer-based solo self-study. Of those available, LCWO.net was the only one that worked reliably on any of my computers, so that's where I started. I've learned quite a lot about how not to learn Morse...
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W4KYR
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Posts: 1585




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« Reply #17 on: November 10, 2017, 06:47:45 AM »

At the Essex CW Boot Camp a few weeks back the instructor leading my group insisted that Morse is mostly rhythm, and you can't learn rythm just by listening; you have to repeat it back. Using a key is as good a way to send the rhythm back as any, so learn to send at the same time as you learn to receive.


(Off topic question)

CW Boot Camp? Sounds interesting...Is it an all weekend event? One Day? How many hours per session? Is it expensive?


I didn't mean to derail the thread, I just wanted to hear more about the CW Boot Camp

Thanks.......
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VK5EEE
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Posts: 1063




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« Reply #18 on: November 10, 2017, 06:54:31 AM »

https://sites.google.com/site/essexcw/news/cwbootcamp2017
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever

Support CW and join CW clubs. QTT: FIST#1124, HSC#1437, UFT#728, RCWC#982, SKCC#15007, CWOPS#1714, 30CW#1,
M0LEP
Member

Posts: 491




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« Reply #19 on: November 10, 2017, 11:34:52 AM »

The Norfolk ARC ( http://www.norfolkamateurradio.org/ ) have run weekend-long boot camps in the past, and the Essex CW Boot Camp was a one-day event borrowing some of their ideas. I think ECWARC are at least considering the possibility of running another one next year. Folk travelled quite a way (by England's standards) to get to it, and I think it was over-subscribed, so there's clearly an appetite among amateurs for face-to-face training.

Here's a report on the day: https://sites.google.com/site/essexcw/news/bootcamp2017-report
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M0LEP
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Posts: 491




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« Reply #20 on: November 22, 2017, 02:34:48 AM »

...and there's a more detailed report in the November 2017 newsletter, which can be found (if you look carefully) on https://sites.google.com/site/essexcw/Resources .
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K3UIM
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Posts: 5




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« Reply #21 on: November 22, 2017, 04:45:58 AM »

"I have observed an unusual (to me) phenomena of some who are new to CW being able to send FASTER than they can receive -- in fact MUCH faster. E.g. they may be sending well at 16 WPM but can't receive 14 WPM well. I assume this is because when they know what they want to send they can recall the character, but when hearing it unexpectedly they cannot readily recall it."
VK5EEE: I spent 30 years with 40 cw and left the hobby (read:"Life") for 25. Getting back into it I find my fist wants to sent 20 wpm while my brain receives at only 10. ... sigh ...
Hi.
Charlie
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VK5EEE
Member

Posts: 1063




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« Reply #22 on: November 22, 2017, 05:08:08 AM »

Hi Charlie,

I would say that is likely because you used to have no trouble sending and receiving at 20. But after the long absence, you remember the rhythm and ability to send and receive 20, but (for the time being) cannot. It may also be frustrating, since you USED to be able to do it.

But worry not... this would be normal. It just needs some practice, and I'd say, start with the receiving (listening) FIRST until you can receive 20 WPM with comfort, then you will have absolutely no problem to send too.

Perhaps just immerse yourself daily in listening to Morse tapes, or, via web SDR -- here is an easy list I made of them so you can simply choose one and click: http://30cw.net/websdr -- find one that is in Europe or Japan and listen (adjust for their time zones, e.g. if in Europe and it is night time listen on 40m or 80m, if it is day time listen on 40m, 30m or 20m).

Just listening you will soon figure our the characters and without any effort either, they will fall into place after some time. The advantage of listening to Europe or Japan area, is that QSO will be mostly "rubber stamp" i.e. RST, QTH, NAME, RIG, PWR, ANT, 73... and this makes it much easier because parts of these QSO will always be the same, and parts, such as QTH, will differ.

In this way you will learn the CW that you need, and the letters that are less familiar will soon also fall into place. You will also hear slight variations in fists etc, which will also greatly help, rather than learning only "perfect" CW which will then be a handicap when you go on air and hear the 90% CW and find it hard to copy, rather than easy as it would otherwise be.

This too is a way to have fun and you can even get an app on your phone called PocketRxTx which you can use on Android phone and even go to sleep (earphones if XYL along side, above, or under) listening to such CQ and QSO. In no time you'll catch up. I encourage, if possible, to do this listening first before transmitting, as in the end your learning will be faster, in my not-so-humble opinion LOL.

An example in a different area: 7th Day Adventist schools in England, they used to teach (hope they still do) their young students things like sewing, planting, gardening, moral stories, skills of a practical nature, first, while those in the government hen factories "another brick in the wall" would not have taught such things, but instead spelling, arithmetic, algebra. So, the 7th Day Adventists would appear to be BEHIND, right? Correct... BUT:

A year or so later down the line, when the 7DA's would get onto things like maths and science and linguistics, they would SHOOT PAST the factory hen school kids like lightning. Because they had the foundations that made a healthier mind which had first been nurtured and prepared and BALANCED, whereas the state government schools did not prepare minds to be balance, how to think and question and reason, but instead just how to be programmed, forgetting that we're not meant to be robots and computers.

Draw this analogy to your CW learning experience: relax, listen, let the CW flow over you, the real CW of countless European companies, or even the Russians, Chinese, Japanese, not the English speaking world where e.g. USA there are so many CW Ops but many are having rag chews at higher speeds, using keyers, or bugs, and then you may feel it is harder, and it is, to do it that way. Have fun getting back to listening to CW, and in no time you'll be ready to also send at 18WPM or more when you go on air!
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever

Support CW and join CW clubs. QTT: FIST#1124, HSC#1437, UFT#728, RCWC#982, SKCC#15007, CWOPS#1714, 30CW#1,
M0LEP
Member

Posts: 491




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« Reply #23 on: November 22, 2017, 07:09:25 AM »

I have observed an unusual (to me) phenomena of some who are new to CW being able to send FASTER than they can receive -- in fact MUCH faster.

I suspect the cause of that is the use of Farnsworth timing in most of the computer tools folk use.You learn the letters at (say) 20wpm, but when you're listening to it Farnsworth-style at (say) 10wpm you have time to decode it. When you send, however, you're used to the 20wpm sound a character makes, so you send the characters at that speed, but you don't need the extra Farnsworth-style gaps between them, so you mostly leave them out. Nett result, you send at 20wpm when you can only really read at 10wpm...
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