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Author Topic: Old radio on tugboat  (Read 2563 times)
KG4YBH
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Posts: 55




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« on: November 08, 2017, 02:59:26 PM »

OK everyone I need some advice. The tug boat I work on has a Motorola Triton 40S SSB radio. It has not been used since I have worked on here and they have it slated to be removed this winter. Does this radio have any value in my amateur station, or should it just get tossed in the dumpster which is where it will be heading if I don't grab it.

Thanks for any advice or suggestions.

Karl
KG4YBH
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K1ZJH
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« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2017, 03:19:53 PM »

It covers the lower ham bands and is channelized.  The trick will be finding a way to program it.
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AC5UP
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« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2017, 03:42:45 PM »

I say nostalgia value only...  There might be programming software that can take it anywhere you like, but what if that software relies on an obsolete computer platform?  Or is a PITA to use?

Even if it is possible to re-program, that doesn't make a channelized radio practical for band surfing.
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KM1H
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« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2017, 05:29:09 PM »

The TX and RX are crystal controlled so that should be fairly easy to work around

The "programming" consists of flipping switches that are preset tuning for segments once initially tuned.

This might be a bit much for someone not deep into the technical side but it certainly isnt a throw away. If anything it is a 100W Motorola xcvr and the final and driver transistors are likely useable in a ham rig for repair.

It is a 1979 rig and the manual appears to be excellent with schematics, parts list, trouble shooting, tune up, etc.

http://www.mobat-usa.com/manuals/Micom-100.pdf

Carl
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AC5UP
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« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2017, 05:51:52 PM »

Assuming the 40S is a cousin of the 20S described in the reference material it's channelized and rockbound............

Might be fun to play with, or a candidate for HF beacon use, but otherwise it is what it is.
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K1ZJH
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« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2017, 06:26:51 PM »

It might a good candidate for a favorite frequency on 60 meters, but crystal prices are going through the roof.

I'd grab it for the parts or for something to play around with.  A cheap synthesizer would take care of the RX
section for monitoring.

Pete
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G3RZP
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« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2017, 06:18:25 AM »

Maritime SSB is USB only, which could be a problem for the LF bands.
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W0AEW
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« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2017, 07:07:54 AM »

Maritime SSB is USB only, which could be a problem for the LF bands.

Except, maybe, as just mentioned, for digital use on set frequencies?  WSPR and similar programs use USB only on the HF bands.  Of course, getting the proper xtals could be a show-stopper.
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WB4SPT
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« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2017, 07:23:08 AM »

It might a good candidate for a favorite frequency on 60 meters, but crystal prices are going through the roof.

I'd grab it for the parts or for something to play around with.  A cheap synthesizer would take care of the RX
section for monitoring.

Pete

yeah,  60m makes the most sense.  AND, don't overlook the antenna tuner, it must be on that boat somewhere.  It is likely more valuable these days than the transceiver. 
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KG4YBH
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« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2017, 10:40:23 AM »

Thanks for all the thoughts. I may rescue it if it is bound for the dumpster. Of course I don't know who will be removing it, could be me or more then likely the companies electronics guy. Don't know what use I would have for it. Oh and the antenna tuner is nowhere to be found, probably disappeared years upon years ago.

Thanks
Karl KG4YBH
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KM1H
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« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2017, 01:41:41 PM »

Maritime SSB is USB only, which could be a problem for the LF bands.

The manual offers several options and CW or digital shouldnt be a show stopper.
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N8FVJ
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« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2017, 04:25:12 AM »

No real value as a simple FT-747 or similar will outperform it for $200. However, it is an interesting radio to a point.
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K1ZJH
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« Reply #12 on: November 10, 2017, 09:25:32 AM »

At one time a ham would grab that and do something with it.  A homebrew guy would have raided it for parts, particularly the SSB filter... oh well.  Toss it in the trash and buy a rig.
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KM1H
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Posts: 2458




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« Reply #13 on: November 10, 2017, 01:49:35 PM »

At least a goodly part of 630 and 2200M are not credit card bands.....yet.
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W9GB
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Posts: 3148




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« Reply #14 on: November 11, 2017, 07:18:41 AM »

Motorola Micom-S / Triton 40-S SSB marine transceiver manual.
http://www.mobat-usa.com/manuals/micom_s/MICOM_S.pdf

Three (3) units appeared on eBay, a few months ago, with programmer board.
eBay auction: 132275735203
« Last Edit: November 11, 2017, 07:28:38 AM by W9GB » Logged
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