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Author Topic: Starting out receiving 630 meters  (Read 1138 times)
W6RYO
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Posts: 4




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« on: November 09, 2017, 10:09:21 AM »

I am getting interested and have been trying to monitor WSPR on 474.2 Khz. I have an Icom 7300 on a 250 foot end fed longwire and a 7600 receiving on an active loop PRO-1B up about 10 feet.I have left both radios running all night for a week and so far have not decoded anything. I know both setups are working since I decode just fine on the HF bands.
 I am considering modifying my 7300 to transmit there. I understand it will put out about 30 watts.
Any thoughts on what bonehead thing I may be doing?
I am in Southern California.

Thanks W6RYO
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AA2UK
Member

Posts: 319




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« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2017, 11:02:42 AM »

Make sure you are receiving 630 meter WSPR in the Upper Side Band position.
There are stations out your way mostly in the PNW.
Bill, AA2UK
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K0OD
Member

Posts: 2964




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« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2017, 11:37:09 AM »

Quote
"I have left both radios running all night for a week and so far have not decoded anything. "

Also make sure your computer's clock is accurate within one second. Did you hit "monitor" on WSPR and yes, USB. You didn't say where you live but I could pick up 630-meter WSPR using my dental work for an antenna. Even at high noon I can pick up one or two beacons, and 6-12 beacons once the sun's down. WSPR aside, you should see and hear various modes around 474.2 kHz. Open up your selectivity. I usually keep mine at 2.5 KHz.

I've been getting plenty of 630-meters west coast stations the past few days. I'm in Missouri.

I don't know a thing about the 7300 but are you using the correct antenna port for longwave?

Beware you'll have a gross mismatch on your IC-7300 if you try transmitting into those antennas. Might fry the transmitter. Will certainly void any warranty.
« Last Edit: November 09, 2017, 11:41:45 AM by K0OD » Logged
AA2UK
Member

Posts: 319




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« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2017, 05:01:14 AM »

I'm wondering if you are finally RX'ing on 630? Last night was a very unique night I copied an a refurbed WWII ship in Indiana WW2LST in QSO with NO3M using CW.  Google WW2LST they are using the original ship's period correct equipment.
Let us know if you have found the problem.
73, Bill
AA2UK
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K0OD
Member

Posts: 2964




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« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2017, 07:20:51 AM »

This weekend should be a lot of fun on 630-meters although the information provided has been sketchy. Not even sure what the time period is, except for the date, November 11 (time zone?). Last year there were many special event stations on the air. Many were in Canada.

Listen especially to the traditional distress frequency of 500 KHz. This is not strictly a ham event.

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W6RYO
Member

Posts: 4




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« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2017, 09:11:56 AM »

Thank you all for the replies. I am now receiving,  I moved the 7600 to my HEX beam and I decoded a whole lot last night including UB7RNY. The 7300 on the long wire only decoded N6GN. I may have a local noise source that I will investigate. I am kind of puzzled that the active loop didn't work better and I am getting an E probe antenna to try.
Definitely a lot of learning here.
I understand that I will need a resonate antenna and a low pass filter to be able to use the 7300 transmit.
I am running Meinberg to sync the clock and all of my decodes are +- 0.3 on time difference.
I am in DM14ed.

 Again thanks and hope to see everybody on the band in the future
Gary
W6RYO
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K0OD
Member

Posts: 2964




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« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2017, 11:25:26 AM »

Quote
"decoded a whole lot last night including UB7RNY."

Hmmm. That's an odd one.... a Russian call but located according to his grid square in the Pacific well off British Columbia according to WSPR net. Could be maritime mobile. You're shown as the only station to pick up UB7RNY.

I see lots of screwy prints on WSPR like that. Some might be MM stations. Others perhaps bootleggers testing WSPR.

Quote
"I am kind of puzzled that the active loop didn't work better and I am getting an E probe antenna to try.
"

I'd stick with using your Hex beam. Doubt an E-probe will improve things much over the loop that failed you. Could be your noise was a one-time event.
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G4AON
Member

Posts: 1022




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« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2017, 01:28:44 AM »

I’ve finally got around to posting a web page describing my version of the PA0RDT active antenna. The difference between mine and the original is better (stiffer) bias for the bipolar transistor, improved isolation from mains borne QRM and a transistor switch to knock off the supply during transmit.

These antennas work really well, very low noise if installed well away from house wiring and go down to around 10 KHz... an easy weekend project?

http://www.qsl.net/g4aon/pa0rdt_aa/

73 Dave
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W9IQ
Member

Posts: 1706




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« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2017, 02:56:48 AM »

Dave,

Why do you think these antennas are "low noise"? Is it simply because you have moved it away from the source of RFI or is there more to it?

- Glenn W9IQ
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- Glenn W9IQ

I never make a mistake. I thought I did once but I was wrong.
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2964




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« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2017, 06:13:26 AM »

I’ve finally got around to posting a web page describing my version of the PA0RDT active antenna.

These antennas work really well, very low noise if installed well away from house wiring and go down to around 10 KHz... an easy weekend project?

http://www.qsl.net/g4aon/pa0rdt_aa/
73 Dave

Upload your WSPR receptions to WSPRnet.org so we (and you) can see how your new active antenna compares with 630-m listeners near you. That's the real test. The UK benefits from a remarkably high density of WSPR users. 
http://wsprnet.org/drupal/
 
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G4AON
Member

Posts: 1022




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« Reply #10 on: November 11, 2017, 06:21:05 AM »

My active antenna is used with a QS1R SDR receiver with CW Skimmer Server for my own “local” RBN. I don’t need comparisons, it often outperforms my 100’ doublet at 30’, despite being mounted at only 7’

73 Dave
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