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Author Topic: running an older rig  (Read 12453 times)
KB9NGI
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Posts: 11




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« on: June 04, 2000, 02:55:43 PM »

I have come into a kenwood 520 which has plate, drive and load adjustments.  Now if I only I had come into the manual!

Can anyone give me a generic hint or two about how one tunes these things?  

Thanks!

73
de
kb9ngi
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N5LF
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« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2000, 07:21:13 PM »

No, High voltage does NOT equate to current.  If you don't have a current setting, then I suppose you use RF and peak everything.

On the TS-520/530/820/830 the high voltage meter setting is used when you are working on the rig - neutralizing the two final amplifier tubes or whatever.  But that meter setting is not normally used in day-to-day operation.  

I bet the manual would give you the neutralizing procedure too. It illustrates how trouble-shooting used to be assumed as a 'ham thing to do.' The manufacturers accommodated the hams in that.  Today's rigs are made to be worked on at the factory and I suppose they want you to throw them out when they are broken >:0(  Keep that TS-520.  It is a real gem!

73 and have a blast.

Alan N5LF
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N5LF
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« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2000, 02:30:50 AM »

I have a TS-830, so it should be similar.  You have three knobs: Drive, Load, and Plate.  You'll also use the Mode switch and Meter switches.

Set the band & frequency to where you want to operate.  Later during your hamming session, if you move more than 150 kHz to 200 kHz or so, you want to retune - depending on your antenna's bandwidth.  Short antennas, or lower bands, need more frequent retuning as you change frequency.

ON RECEIVE
1. Listen to signals or static on your antenna and peak the drive control for maximum volume.

2. Switch to a dummy load (or your antenna only if you absolutely must).

MODE = TUNE & METER = CURRENT
3. Set MODE switch to 'TUNE' - this puts a small signal thru the radio - so you won't hurt the finals.

4. With the METER on 'CURRENT', peak the meter with the DRIVE knob.

5. With METER on CURRENT, *dip* the meter with the PLATE knob - it may have a very broad dip.  If it is hard to see, try the METER in 'RF' position and *Peak* the RF using the Plate knob.  If you have trouble getting a reading, advance the ALC knob a little.

METER = 'RF'
6. Switch the Meter to 'RF' and *peak* with the Load knob

7. (This step is optional for perfectionists) With Meter on 'RF', *peak* with the Plate knob

MODE = 'CW', METER = 'RF'
8. SWITCH Mode to CW. (NOTE: Make sure the VOX is on and if you have a key, hold it down while tuning).

9. Repeat 7 & 8, gently nudging up with the Load knob, and then peaking the meter with the Plate knob, until you get a reading of 90 to 120 Watts. (Again, if you have trouble getting a reading as high as 90 watts, advance the ALC knob a little).

IMPORTANT: DO NOT TRANSMIT IN CW MODE FOR MORE THAN 15 OR 20 SECONDS AT A TIME: REST 5-10 SECONDS BETWEEN.  It can decrease the life of those finals, and also make you VERY unpopular to the poor guys you're tuning up on top of (you DID check if the frequency was free, right? ;^) -- a dummy load is a good investment).

SWITCH FROM THE DUMMY LOAD TO THE ANTENNA
10. If you have a tuned antenna, then you are ready to go.  If not, then tune your antenna tuner on the air - DO NOT TOUCH THE 520 - only the antenna tuner if you are using one.

METER = ALC (ADJUSTING ALC/MIC KNOB0
11.  In CW, use the ALC knob to set the CW so that the needle bounces just into the 'good' range - shown by tick marks over the middle 2/3 of the meter or so.

In SSB, talk into the mic and adjust the MIC control so your voice peaks stay around the middle of the 'good range.'

12.  HAVE FUN!
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KB9NGI
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« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2000, 09:36:47 AM »

Thanks!

This is exactly what I was seeking.  One question does "High Voltage" on the meter equate to "current?"

I really appreciate the help.

73
de KB9NGI
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W5HTW
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« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2000, 11:38:28 AM »


There used to be a thing called "Ohms Law" which told about "voltage" not being "current."   I think that law has been overthrown, though.  

Just kidding, sort of.  Someone gave you good instructions about tuning.  One caution.  On most of the 'drive' controls, you may find a noise peak, listening to the receiver, at two, or even more, points.  Most of the controls are marked with something that relates to the intended band position.  Find the peak that is near that point.   If, in other words, your "drive" control has marks that read 80, 40, 20, 15, etc... and you are tuning on the 20 meter band, you don't want to find a noise peak at the 80 meter position and choose that one, as you may be out of band.  I suspect the newer of the old rigs have enough bandpass filters to prevent that from happening, but some of the old ones were quite easy to select the wrong peak in tuning, or even the wrong place to dip the finals (an obsolete term) resulting in working on harmonics or parasitics.  

Ed
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FORMER_WA_4RX_ROB
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Posts: 13




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« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2000, 10:57:39 PM »

I have a copy of the TS 520 S manual. Let me know if you'd like it. Cost=free.
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