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Author Topic: 10 Meter FM Simplex Channels  (Read 3995 times)
KV4BL
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Posts: 80




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« on: February 07, 2001, 10:40:49 AM »

   I have checked back as far as this old WebTV "classic" will allow me to go and have been unable to find this question.  If it has previously been covered, I'll ask your forgivness in advance.  I have heard that there are "other" simplex frequencies on 10 meters besides the calling frequency of 29.600.  I am also aware of the four pairs used for repeater operation.  Can anyone please advise me as to what these other simplex frequencies are?  I would appreciate the actual frequencies (such as 146.520, 146.535, 146.550,...147.585) as opposed to the range that they are found in as I don't wish to risk miscalculating the simplex channels as could easily be done on the 2 meter band, used for my example.  Thank You.   73,  Ray
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WO6T
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Posts: 10




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« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2001, 12:37:55 PM »

you have it in full, ONE freq. for 10M FM simplex, AS IN THE BAND PLAN, "ARRL BAND PLAN",  ? this never did seem complete ! BAND PLANS ARE GOOD, I CAN DO THAT, But "one" freq. ? ? ?   that makes the guideline out of date for to days use, we are talking about FM not SSB. I have all ways wondered about that my self. at the time ARRL put this in the repeter directory  verry few hams had 10M FM.  == I hope all FM AND SSB users that, Are not useing the Satellites will stay away from  29.300 to 29.510            
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WB9YCJ
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Posts: 5




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« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2001, 04:36:58 PM »

29.600 National Simplex Calling Freq--make contact and
       MOVE (or so they say).
29.500 Common U.S. FM simplex freq. Ragchew encouraged.
29.200 to 29.300 frequent FM simplex observed    
       during band openings (U.S. & International).
29.300 Japanese FM Simplex national calling freq.
       If you make contact with a "JA" here, they will
       usually ask you to QSY.

Asian FM simplex activity is often heard from 29.100
through 29.300 (especially here on the U.S. West Coast). When the band is WIDE open to Asia, you will also likely hear Shanghainese fishing boats using 29.0 through 29.3. Sometime above and below.  I know because, I recorded them often and had a Chinese friend identify it. They ARE NOT Hams and are actually off the east coast of China using these freqs for their comms. If you listen carefully, sometime you can hear the motors of their boats in the background of their audio. I.T.U., where are you?  Snowballs chance in hades to get rid of these guys. No Bull.
Do not use 29.51 to 29.59 for simplex (no brainer).
I have (a few times) heard U.S. "bootleg" activity above 29.7, but shh-h-h-h, dont spread that around!  
73, Ken.  
 
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 21753




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« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2001, 06:26:15 PM »

Is it just me or is selective fading a huge problem w/10m FM?  Much worse than VHF-UHF, when I hear sigs on 10m FM, unless they are extremely local (LOS), selective fading and distortion is a huge problem.  Maybe this adds to the challenge and makes it more fun?  What I hear, using any receiver on 10m FM, is the kind of distortion often heard on HF AM BCB signals (41m, etc), where selective fading makes music sound silly (and makes me wonder why they transmit this?) -- are others not experiencing this?
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 17046




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« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2001, 04:11:08 PM »

I believe that wide-band FM is only allowed in the US between
29.5 and 29.7 MHz - and (according to FCC rules) this has to
include the sidebands of the signal.  So, if your FM signal is 20 kHz
wide, it is illegal to use carrier frequencies below 29.510 or above
29.690 MHz.  Going lower than 29.510 is a bad idea anyway, as
it interferes with the satellites in the 29.3 to 29.5 range.

Wide-band FM is restricted to this small frequency range because
it takes much more spectrum space than other modes.  Again,
assuming 20 kHz channel spacing, there are only 10 channels
available between 29.5 and 29.7.  The 4 repeater pairs take two of
these apiece, so, even with optimum planning, there wouldn't be
room for more than 2 simplex channels.
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KV4BL
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Posts: 80




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« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2001, 01:31:45 PM »

Thanks, Guys.  I appreciate all of your responses and your taking the time to send them.  While I didn't really specify it, my concern was for local (USA) usage and it looks worse than I had feared.  I knew that whatever was there woulnd't be a whole lot but I didn't know it was that bad.  As one of you hinted at, it looks like the ARRL and/or FCC kinda dropped the ball with regard to the band plan for 29MHz FM.  I didn't expect 50 channels but I don't think three or four (counting the "call" channel) simplex voice channels would be unreasonable.  While I don't begrudge the emergence of new technology, I fear that a lot of this new techno-mezzo stuff is slowly pushing just plain old talkin and brass poundin on the radio off of the bands.  By that, I mean all of the new emerging "digital" modes, satellites, etc.  I hope people don't become so wrapped up in those things that voice and CW become a total thing of the past.  OH well, I digress.  Thanks guys, you've been a big help.         73,   Ray  KV4BL
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WB9YCJ
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Posts: 5




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« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2001, 05:16:07 PM »

Wideband FM is the modulation term for transmissions that occur in the Broadcast T.V. audio channels and Broadcast F.M. audio 88.1 through 108 MHz. Typically, frequency deviation of 100 KHz is considered
"wideband". This is why you cannot properly pick-up TV audio with a usual Narrowband fm "police scanner" tuned to TV audio freqs.

Hams using legal Narrowband F.M. (5 KHz deviation) are usually frowned upon when using 10 meter frequencies below 29.100 Mhz. I encourage any ham who has the Narrowband FM capability and desire, to join the gang, and work stations as they wish between 29.100 and 29.300 (clean nbfm emissions assumed). If you find AMers between 29.1 and 29.2 please consider QSY if needed. While staying out of the satelite bandplan, I suspect a 5 kHz deviation signal on 29.500 simplex should not bother the satelite guys below 29.490.  

-Ken.

     
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KC9UOD
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Posts: 3




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« Reply #7 on: October 27, 2017, 11:07:16 AM »

AS a Old Air Force Radio Relay Operator and suffering from loss of hearing from years of SSB use.  10 M FM is a Delight, hope to hear you our there! Smiley
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K9YLI
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Posts: 1191




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« Reply #8 on: October 27, 2017, 01:08:25 PM »

so far no one has mentioned that there are no 'channels' on 10 meter FM,. Its a  VFO area and any where there is open frequency is where youcan transmit. Un like VHf which is channelized.
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K0UA
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Posts: 1342




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« Reply #9 on: October 27, 2017, 01:42:51 PM »

As for the selective fading and distortion on the signals. yes, that is part and parcel to 10 meter FM.
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WA3SKN
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Posts: 6492




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« Reply #10 on: October 28, 2017, 07:54:41 AM »

2001 post.

-Mike.
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AC7CW
Member

Posts: 962




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« Reply #11 on: October 28, 2017, 10:51:56 AM »

AS a Old Air Force Radio Relay Operator and suffering from loss of hearing from years of SSB use.  10 M FM is a Delight, hope to hear you our there! Smiley


I love 10M FM when the sunspots are good. Used to go home from work and talk all over the world with amazingly good audio. It's the only mode where I feel like I'm talking to a real person. My xyl was actually impressed after hearing all the garbage mouth people on CB and ssb stuff that she couldn't stand. I pretty much can't stand ssb, I have music-quality hearing, AM is ok but FM is the best... I always thought it was channelized though, must have been the radio I had, it tuned that portion of the band in 10kHz steps...
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Novice 1958, 20WPM Extra now... (and get off my lawn)
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