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Author Topic: Vquad antenna  (Read 1033 times)
W4MSG
Member

Posts: 1




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« on: July 22, 2001, 09:53:42 PM »

Like alot of Hams,  I previously enjoyed 11 meters
and was inspired by it to become a ham. Many CB operators used cubical quads and Vquads.  I've seen lots of information on cubical quads but virtually nothing on the amazing Vquad???  It worked great on
11 meters.  Why doesnt' anyone manufactor it for
10 or 15 or 20  meters Huh?
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W5RH
Member

Posts: 11




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« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2001, 10:16:10 AM »

Can you provide any web sites or manufaturers names for this V-Quad?  I'd like to check it out.

Thanks and regards...Rick...W5RH
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20540




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« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2001, 11:13:06 AM »

There's nothing "amazing" about the V-quad (a misnomer, since it's not a quad, at all). This is nothing more than a vertically-inclined delta loop (technically the correct term, since the element loops in the "V-quad" only have three sides), and its performance is no better, nor necessarily worse, than an ordinary quad having square shaped loops.

The V-quad is normally fed to be vertically polarized, which is the popular orientation for CB work but not necessarily best for amateur work.  The 4-sided quad more popular in amateur circles lends itself far better for multi-band work, since quad loops can be placed "inside" other quad loops, to perform on higher frequency bands than the outer loop, using the same original "spreader" supports.  With a V-quad (I hate that term!  It's made-up CB lingo which has no basis in anything making sense), the design is much more "single band" in nature, as additional delta-shaped elements cannot be placed inside the original, outer one -- at least not very easily -- because the feedpoint is at the bottom of the "vee."

A four-sided "real quad" has its feedpoint anywhere you want it to be, and each loop in a multiband design is completely isolated from the other loops.  The easiest place to feed a large quad is at the center of the horizontal leg representing the bottom of each loop.  Reason is simple: Gravity prefers it this way.  Feeding the quad loop at any other point is a matter of defying gravity to some extent, so special provisions must be made to support the feedline out of the radiation plane of the loop, and properly insulate it.

Thus, because a quad has the same aperture as a "V-quad" (typically one wavelength in circumference or perimeter), but is easier to feed as a horizontally polarized antenna, and is also easier to make as a multi-band configuration, there's really no reason to use 3-sided elements.  

73 de Steve WB2WIK/6
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« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2001, 06:58:28 PM »

This antenna was found by doing search for the word
" MaCo Antenna "   The stat's look impressive for a monoband beam. (Huh?)  It compares favorably with a three element yagi and has only half the weight
( 8 ) lbs...
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