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Author Topic: How to make a contact thru a repeater  (Read 419 times)
KC8TBY
Member

Posts: 47




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« on: February 20, 2002, 09:50:31 AM »

OK...I'm going to sound lile a real "newbie" to you more experienced hams...but here comes my question...
How (exactly) do I make a contact thru a local repeater?
Do I simply tune to the exact repeater frequency, key the mike, say something like "listening and waiting for a call on this frequency"?  I have monitored alot of transmissions on frequencies near the local repeater frequency...are these all simplex transmissions?
OK..so I warned you, I'm brand new to this hobby!  I've got alot of electronic theory and circuit expertise BUT I need alot of help from you Elmers out there on the actual operation of my rig!
Thanks in advance!!!
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K8RBT
Member

Posts: 29




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« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2002, 10:21:16 AM »

In my area (Lansing, Michigan) typically people either just say their call or their call plus saying monitoring or listening. Once in a while a newbie comes on and starts in with cq, cq, cq but this isn't standard practice for a repeater.

Probably your best bet is listen to the various repeaters in your area bit and see what others are doing. Try listening at normal commute times when there is more likely to be some activity.

Hope this helps.
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KB1HJW
Member

Posts: 70




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« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2002, 10:54:23 AM »

Make sure you set up your rig for the correct +/- and tone if required. Check the repeater information on
http://www.artscipub.com/repeaters/
to get the correct setting.
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WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20547




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« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2002, 11:07:38 AM »

Make sure you've programmed your transceiver for the correct offset as well as the correct "PL" (CTCSS) tone, and when you hear activity, quickly inject your callsign between the other stations' transmissions. Say nothing more, just your callsign, quickly.  If they hear you, they should respond and invite you to join the conversation.  That will tell you if you're really "making" the repeater or not.

(Note: Simply "keying up" a repeater, and having its carrier or ID come back to you is not an indication of being able to make a contact.  A very weak signal can "key up" many repeaters; it takes a stronger signal to be readable.)

The "other signals" near your local repeater frequency may be simplex stations, but are more likely other repeaters.  They may be farther away, or ones you simply don't know about.  The "simplex" activity on 2m is almost all in the simplex set-aside areas prescribed by the ARRL Band Plan, and published everywhere.

The most common method for initiating a repeater contact, if you're sure you're within range of the repeater and capable of "making it" with a readable signal, is to wait for a period of inactivity, transmit, and say, "WXXXX listening," using your callsign.  Optional verbiage is "WXXXX monitoring," or "WXXXX listening on 146.76" (or whatever the output frequency of the repeater is).  Keep it short.  Remember the purpose of repeaters is to enhance the range of mobile-to-mobile contacts, and that's the primary purpose.

WB2WIK/6
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WA7KPK
Member

Posts: 129




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« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2002, 12:48:57 PM »

You might also check to see if any of the repeaters in the area have nets you can check into. For instance here in the Seattle area there are two repeaters that I know of that have nets almost every day, for every purpose from discussing computers and packet radio to public service to general ragchewing. If you find a net that sounds interesting, listen for net control to direct you when to check in.  For instance he might call for stations whose suffixes start with Papa through Tango (P - Q - R - S - T -- that's you). Follow the procedures other hams are using, and if you hear someone you'd like to talk with further, arrange for an after-net QSO.

73, Creede
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KD6ELB
Member

Posts: 48




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« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2002, 01:09:52 PM »

I my area (SF Bay Area) it's common practice to hear people say "<callsign> monitoring" and adding "mobile" if you are not at home.  This is regarded as an invitation to respond for a chat.  Listen first to make sure there is no ongoing conversation on the repeater.

If I wanted a signal report to see if I was hitting the repeater I would say "This is KD6ELB, would anyone out there like to give me a signal report?"  Almost always someone comes back - and then you can use the initial discussion around how the audio sounds, what the rig is, etc, to break the ice.  Give your name early on too.  And have fun!

Richard
KD6ELB
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KC9AZL
Member

Posts: 250




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« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2002, 07:41:19 PM »

I am not a repeater guy but I will tell you that to use the repeater you transmit one frequency and recieve on another.  The recieving frequency is known as an output and the transmitting as an input.  On 2 meters I believe that the offset the amount of frequency between the input and the output is 600 khz. .  Just to tell you I have never used a repeater.  I only operate HF.
 
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KE4DRN
Member

Posts: 3714




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« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2002, 12:15:08 AM »

Hi,

This link will get you started !

http://www.rars.org/repeater/rptrgide.htm

73 james
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