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Author Topic: David Clark Aviation Headset?  (Read 449 times)
KD5QPF
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Posts: 42




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« on: February 20, 2002, 11:17:48 AM »

Aside from the cost, it seems to me the David Clark aviation style headsets would be perfect for amateur radio use. Has anyone used these headsets successfully? Is there a particular model (H10-13, H10-20, etc.) that is recommended and/or better suited for amateur radio use?

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WB2WIK
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« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2002, 11:35:04 AM »

I suppose you realize these are in the $300 to $700 range....

I wouldn't pay that much for noise cancelling features (which is the primary reason they cost so much), for use in a hamshack environment.  I can't comment on how they sound in an SSB operating environment, but when used for aviation, they don't sound particularly natural...very restricted, not great fidelity, probably due to the extreme noise-cancelling characteristic.

You can "test drive" a set at your local aviation shop!

WB2WIK/6
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AC5E
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« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2002, 03:35:53 PM »

Hi: I have a couple of Dave Clark's I use at the farm. They are great - but! The ones I have made me do some homebrewing.

The mike has a built in preamp, and requires both "the right plug" and "the right voltage." And once I got it working, the locals who know what I sound like say it sounds as though I'm using a Heil DX cartridge in the mike. Lotsa highs, few lows. And a couple of pilot buddies gave me a "I could'a tole ya so."

In short, excellent intelligibility, but low fi. If that suits you - and you can stand the tab - they are very comfortable for the long haul. Good contest headsets, though.

73  Pete Allen  AC5E
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KD5QPF
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« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2002, 06:24:13 PM »

I agree the noise cancelling feature wouldn't seem to be very advantageous in an amateur radio environment (except, god forbid, possibly in some emergency situations)... rather, it's the presumed design focus on intelligibility that Pete mentioned.

Given the plethoria of different models, does anyone have a particular model they feel is best suited for amateur radio use? e.g. impedence matching, ease of modification, etc.
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AC5E
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« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2002, 09:41:13 PM »

Actually, I have never tried my avsets during an emergency. So far, their noise cancelling mikes have proven their value during contests, when I have three stations in a one station shack.

I bought six avsets at a bankruptcy auction - and everyone loves the Telex's. Which use standard plugs and whose mike outputs are compatible with my other equipment. The two "green daves" are nice, but were not compatible with anything. Lord knows what they were made for, no one that I have asked had any idea.

If I were shopping, I would ask to look at the data sheet that comes with the set, and look for headset impedance/mike output and impedance/connectors, etc., etc,: and make absolutely sure these will be compatible with what I have without a lot of hassles.  

If I were thinking, I would first consider that these are specialized and expensive items with limited utility, and do I really want to do this?

73  Pete Allen  AC5E

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W4XKE
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Posts: 67




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« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2002, 08:36:00 PM »

I kept the David Clark headset when I sold my Stinson and tried using it on both a Ten Tec Scout and a Ten Tec Corsair.  The audio was so attenuated that I had to turn the volume way up and even then, I could hear much better with just the speaker.  I talked with a technician who worked for an avionics outfit and they said the impedences didn't match and it would require a matching transformer to work.  I calculated the turns ratio required and couldn't find a suitable transformer from Jameco, Mouser or the Shack.  My tech friend said they'd tried adapting aviation headsets to ham use and it had always been less than ideal.  The advice I got was to leave the aviation headsets in the plane and buy a good communications headset that is designed to work with your rig.  My DC is hanging out in the shack with my logs and slide-rule aviation calculator for conversation pieces and memory excursions.  73, Johnny W4XKE
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KB3GHK
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« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2002, 01:49:13 PM »

I believe the phone speakers of headsets run 500 ohm
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KC8RYW
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« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2002, 07:26:56 PM »

I'm not sure if the aviator version DC's are much different, but I know public safety users have found bliss with DC's Commercial Two-Way models. VERY popular with fire departments. These actually reduce outside noise levels to the user, while allowing them to hear radio traffic better, too.

A helpful hint: don't wear a pair of full DC's while driving a car. It is illegal in some areas. DC makes single ear headphones for this purpose.

Last time I went to Michigan International Speedway, a lot of people had headphones similar to DC's (I'm not sure if they were DC brand or not.) NASCAR is a loud sport hi hi.

BTW, DC has a website. http://www.davidclark.com/
It's worth a looksie.
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W6T6TT
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« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2004, 05:26:57 PM »

hi can any one tell me how to wire David Clark Headsets H3330 to icom-746??
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