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Author Topic: Twin-lead J-pole apartment mounting?  (Read 1123 times)
KF4UNA
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Posts: 2




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« on: February 21, 2003, 11:24:04 AM »

Hello everyone!

Back a few years ago I lived in a nice wood-frame townhouse in Alexandria, VA.  I built myself a twin-lead j-pole and put in it a PVC pipe from Home Depot.  I loved it!  Then things changed...

I now live in condo apartment in the middle of D.C.  The building was built in 1903 and the windows have metal frames.  Forgot about transmitting on my IC-T2H.

So finally I get to my question: If I build another twin-lead j-pole, what are my mounting options?  I was contemplating taping it against the metal window frame, but that is probably not a stroke of genius.  Or maybe tape it vertically down the length of the window.  Or what about thumb-tacking it on a wall next to a book shelf to make it less obvious?

Any input would be very much appreciated.  With a bit of luck I should be able to hit W3DOS and K3VOA from the apartment.  MAYBE even K4US on top of the Masonic Temple in Alexandria.

Cheers and 73!

Nico
KF4UNA
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20666




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« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2003, 12:29:43 PM »

Tape it vertically oriented (of course) to the center of the glass window pane.  Normally that will work far better than any other location except having the antenna completely "outside."

WB2WIK/6
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KT8K
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Posts: 1490




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« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2003, 01:57:17 PM »

Definitely do NOT tape it to the metal window frame, if you want it to radiate much at all.  If your building is covered with aluminum siding or any sort of conductive material the center of the largest window available will be best.  If the building is covered in vinyl or wood, however, you might get good results attaching it to the wall (away from metal objects) depending on where the wiring/plumbing is inside the wall.  Have someone outside with a radio talk to you and check the signal strength as you try the antenna in different locations.
Good luck!
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KF4UNA
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« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2003, 02:20:34 PM »

First of all thank you so much for your input so far.  It's definitely helped alot!

Let me clear another thing up: The building is made of brick on the outside.  So, no aluminum siding.  I also don't think there would be any plumbing in that particular part of the wall.  But there may be metal studs but I can find those with a stud finder.

One additional question: Instead of a J-Pole, would it make sense or would it be better to make a twinlead 1/2-wave dipole mounted vertically?

Thanks again!

Nico
KF4UNA
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WD6EJN
Member

Posts: 1




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« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2003, 05:51:09 PM »

Unless you can get the antenna outdoors, you might
try a yagi aimed at the window, if the window is very small it won't work very well, you can aim it out a sky light, but the aperture will be so small, you will only get reflections off planes and weather fronts.
If you have a porch you can position the j-pole a half
wave in the center of two adjoining walls making a
corner reflector.
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KF4ZGZ
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Posts: 289


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« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2003, 07:12:09 AM »

If you can put it out the window, put it in PVC, mount it at about a 45 deg. angle, and hang a flag on it.

Matt, kf4zgz
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